#1
Hey guys!
I'm curious as to whether i got it right
The movement should come from the wrist moving only sieways, and not any other direction. The fingers should stay still, the forearm shouldnt rotate. And also slight transition with the arm while changing strings.
Pick should be at a 45 degree angle, and when changing strings, the pick angle must not change not horizontally or vertically.

Is this correct?
I recently found out that it's wrong to tilt your pick when changing strings (by that i mean the edge of the pick tilting up and down) (i hope it makes sence), i guess this is what has been holding me back for several years.
So i've decided to re-learn the picking movement after all these years, i just want to make sure i get it right this time
#2
Also when re-learning alternate picking, i should definetly start very very slowly with those very beginner exercises right? too soon for the frank gambale chopbuilder, eh?
#3
The movement should come from the wrist moving only sieways, and not any other direction. The fingers should stay still, the forearm shouldnt rotate. And also slight transition with the arm while changing strings.


Well, no. A little rotation is useful and you need to move in and out of the strings.

What you need to focus on is -

Relaxation
Accuracy
Efficiency


If you've been stuck you just haven't been doing enough practice.
#4
Quote by Freepower
Well, no. A little rotation is useful and you need to move in and out of the strings.

What you need to focus on is -

Relaxation
Accuracy
Efficiency


If you've been stuck you just haven't been doing enough practice.


hmm...when the rotation isnt bad, then i shouldn't re learn the technique
so i should just head on with the chop builder? :b

also Freepower, i do need some pointers on how exactly to practice. I do concentrate on Accuaracy and Efficiency, and i am relaxed, but im not exactly sure what tempos i should be practicing at. should i film somekind of video where i do picking at different speeds? (each speed differing about 10bpm or 5bpm?) I could really use the advice :P

...im hungry
#5
^ you practice differently for different stuff.

If you want to build stamina, play fastish for long periods of time.
If you need to nail something really fiddly, you might have to play it super, super slow.

As for slowly increasing tempo, sometimes you can bump it up quickly, sometimes it takes months. You have to just do it by feel, and you get better at it with time.
#6
Quote by Freepower
^ you practice differently for different stuff.

If you want to build stamina, play fastish for long periods of time.
If you need to nail something really fiddly, you might have to play it super, super slow.

As for slowly increasing tempo, sometimes you can bump it up quickly, sometimes it takes months. You have to just do it by feel, and you get better at it with time.


what if i want to get my whole techqnue up to "really fiddly" ?
should i keep up with the slowly increasing tempo or practice realyl really slow?
#7
im sort of reading out that i should practice all my exercises really really slowly, cuz all i really wanna do is nail all those exercises in a fiddly speed and that should get my picking up to speed.
So i'll practice really really slow then, like triplets @ 70bpm :P
#8
^ "really fiddly" is relative. If it's very difficult for you, take it down very slow.

You need to practice slow to develop co-ordination, but you also need to spend some time developing strength and stamina - if you just play a lot that'll do the trick, but you might want to spend some time practising licks at "normal" speeds.
#9
don't fall into the trap where you work exclusively on technique. Technique exercises are useful, but what really increases your skill, imo, is playing songs AND using efficient technique to do so. Rythm playing as actually more of a workout for your general chops than technique exercises. Technique exercises should not be played faster than you can play accurately and perfectly--the idea is to concentrate on TECHNIQUE. So, if you are trying to get alternate picking down, try to use as small motions as possible, stay as relaxed as possible. Really concentrate on how each note is picked. With me, the wrist motion is not unlike that used when drawing or writing: wrist resting lightly on the bridge and the muscle motion is essentially the same. I'm on my 3rd month into changing my guitar playing style totally. I always used to play with floating wrist and I've found that resting my wrist lightly on the bridge has opened up access to small fine articulate muscles I never thought existed. I still can't play fast, but my technique has improved SIGNIFICANTLY; and I can play faster for longer than I could before (but still not fast). In fact, since I started this 3 months ago, the most significant progress I've made is the dissolution of my OLD technique. I actually feel the old magic from when I was a kid learning to play the guitar--everything is 'ripe with possibility', lol.
#10
Quote by Freepower
^ "really fiddly" is relative. If it's very difficult for you, take it down very slow.

You need to practice slow to develop co-ordination, but you also need to spend some time developing strength and stamina - if you just play a lot that'll do the trick, but you might want to spend some time practising licks at "normal" speeds.


i mostly practice at a fastish tempo for long periods of time, so i have alot of stamina. the trouble begins when i speed up and the hand motion becomes "freaky"
#11
Quote by afrika18
don't fall into the trap where you work exclusively on technique. Technique exercises are useful, but what really increases your skill, imo, is playing songs AND using efficient technique to do so. Rythm playing as actually more of a workout for your general chops than technique exercises. Technique exercises should not be played faster than you can play accurately and perfectly--the idea is to concentrate on TECHNIQUE. So, if you are trying to get alternate picking down, try to use as small motions as possible, stay as relaxed as possible. Really concentrate on how each note is picked. With me, the wrist motion is not unlike that used when drawing or writing: wrist resting lightly on the bridge and the muscle motion is essentially the same. I'm on my 3rd month into changing my guitar playing style totally. I always used to play with floating wrist and I've found that resting my wrist lightly on the bridge has opened up access to small fine articulate muscles I never thought existed. I still can't play fast, but my technique has improved SIGNIFICANTLY; and I can play faster for longer than I could before (but still not fast). In fact, since I started this 3 months ago, the most significant progress I've made is the dissolution of my OLD technique. I actually feel the old magic from when I was a kid learning to play the guitar--everything is 'ripe with possibility', lol.


i totally agree, learning songs gives good progress. But when in a song, there is a fast alternate picking part. I just stack into my collection of exercises, and practice it the same way i practice my other exercises. thats probbably not the right way to do it lol. at first i get the lick down slowly, when i feel it has been saved in my muscle memory, i speed it up until i cant play it any faster, and then practice at the max tempo where its clean. maybe i should do that with all the exercises?
#12
If you really want to get your timing down pretty pat, try really making things stick out when just playing in simple 4/4. Try something with a 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & pattern and really try to make an "oomph!" and stress the note on a certain number consistently. Mix and match them (use different numbers, use more then one number, etc) while keeping everything steady with different tempos and it should work for you.

http://blog.www.littlerockjams.com
Last edited by LittleRockJams at Jul 18, 2011,