#1
Hi there Ive re-strung my guitar and changed the string gauge to 11's from 10's and I tuned it up to drop A once I put the strings on and the bridge would be how you would normally want it. But then i tuned it up to Drop B and the bridge started coming up quite a bit. then I went to Drop C and the bridge rise up even more now Ive tried to put it into Drop C# which is what I want to use and I cant just barely tune the strings to the notes in that tuning and the third string wont tune to the note that I want which is F# it just gets to F and wont go any higher. and at the moment i can fit my finger under my bridge it's that high and I have no idea why this has happened. But obviously too there is too much string tension but what can i do about this?
#2
You have to adjust the truss rod to accommodate the thicker strings. And no offence, but you sound like someone who doesn't understand how a guitar works, so I wouldn't make those adjustments yourself, you could snap the neck of your guitar. Take it to a guitar shop, should cost around 20 bucks.
#3
Okay what kind of bridge do you even have?

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jthm_guitarist
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#4
Yeh haha I know nothing about the guitar itself I only know how to re-string it but i mean you don't really find out how to fix these problems till you encounter them and I dont know the name of the bridge I have but it's like your everyday bridge you have on a strat
#5
Take off the back plate and tighten those screws holding the springs with a screwdriver.
You might have to put another spring or two in there.

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#6
I agree with Zan595, take it somewhere to get it fixed and have the guy fixing it explain it to you. Better get it down right than breaking something unecessarily.
#7
Quote by jthm_guitarist
Take off the back plate and tighten those screws holding the springs with a screwdriver.
You might have to put another spring or two in there.

its really this easy.
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#8
You're not going to break anything if you leave the truss rod alone and the neck isn't going to snap.

Do as jthm_guitarist wisely advises. Tighten the springs and add anohter spring 'if' you have to. (lots of how to videos on You tube) If it doesn't work put lighter strings back on. If it's out of whack after that...then take it to a shop.

Hint...don't mess with these tunings, etc. until you are a decent guitarist.
#10
Quote by Pocopot
You're not going to break anything if you leave the truss rod alone and the neck isn't going to snap.

Why would you leave the truss rod alone if it needs adjusting for thicker strings? And it WILL snap if someone, not knowing what they're doing, tightens it far too much. It takes very small, precise turns to adjust a truss rod, really easy to break or damage a neck by not knowing what you're doing.
#11
Quote by Zan595
Why would you leave the truss rod alone if it needs adjusting for thicker strings? And it WILL snap if someone, not knowing what they're doing, tightens it far too much. It takes very small, precise turns to adjust a truss rod, really easy to break or damage a neck by not knowing what you're doing.


You only adjust the truss rod, ONLY!!! If it needs it, if it doesn't, don't friken touch it. You're usually safe if your just switching one gauge up or down, but if you do something drastic like go from .010's to .012's in the same tuning then you might need to adjust it, but check first, see how the neck bends first, before you make any adjustments, then determine if it needs to be adjusted.


I've never had to touch the truss rod on any of my guitars ever, and I change tunings all the time, but I always use either .010's or .011's. I have perfect action still, after 6 years of abuse.
#12
Quote by Zan595
Why would you leave the truss rod alone if it needs adjusting for thicker strings? And it WILL snap if someone, not knowing what they're doing, tightens it far too much. It takes very small, precise turns to adjust a truss rod, really easy to break or damage a neck by not knowing what you're doing.

You offered no advice on how to properly check to see if the truss rod needs adjustment, and how much to adjust it. I'm all about having the guitar setup properly for best playability, but I don't think people should be adjusting their truss rod and gauging it by they string action, that's not really how it works.

Here's a good website explaining what to look for when adjusting a truss rod:
http://www.igdb.co.uk/pages/guitar_setup/truss_rod.htm

Also, it is quite possible that the bridge needs another spring to counter the higher string tension.
#13
Quote by ethan_hanus
You only adjust the truss rod, ONLY!!! If it needs it, if it doesn't, don't friken touch it. You're usually safe if your just switching one gauge up or down, but if you do something drastic like go from .010's to .012's in the same tuning then you might need to adjust it, but check first, see how the neck bends first, before you make any adjustments, then determine if it needs to be adjusted.


I've never had to touch the truss rod on any of my guitars ever, and I change tunings all the time, but I always use either .010's or .011's. I have perfect action still, after 6 years of abuse.


Correct. That's why iIsaid leave the truss rod alone.

Also, if you are not experienced leave the guitar alone. Always put the same size strings on. Folks make all these 'changes' to their guitars before they know how to play them properly. Changing string sizes, pickups, bridges, etc. does ZIP if you can't play worth a darn.
#14
Quote by ethan_hanus
I've never had to touch the truss rod on any of my guitars ever, and I change tunings all the time, but I always use either .010's or .011's. I have perfect action still, after 6 years of abuse.

Same here, once. Took off my 9s and put on 12s. No setup needed. The guitar didnt care either way. Too much of a change for me, I didnt like it, so the 9s are back on.
#15
Quote by Pocopot
Also, if you are not experienced leave the guitar alone. Always put the same size strings on. Folks make all these 'changes' to their guitars before they know how to play them properly. Changing string sizes, pickups, bridges, etc. does ZIP if you can't play worth a darn.

Um, how do you Get experienced if you leave the guitar alone?
And maybe if you cant play worth a darn you Should give up playing and be a tech.
Just a different perspective to think about.