#1
Hi all, I'm currently in Spain for a camp and I've been asked to play guitar at several group sessions. I can't however because the chords are all different in the song books. Instead of (A, B, C,.... G), the chords are (DO, RE, MI,.... TI). Would this just translate to the C Major scale or would it depend on the music? If anybody knows, I'd really appreciate it because I have two weeks left to learn
#5
I'm not 100% sure but I believe it goes by whatever scale you're using. Never heard of anyone using that system to show what chords to play though.

EDIT: Nevermind this, the link is way more reliable.
Last edited by Miiiiks at Jul 17, 2011,
#7
Quote by Flibo


I doubt it's the fixed solfége system to be honest, it's more likely to be the relative version of the system so each of the do-re-mi and so on refers to intervals rather than specific notes.

Does kind of make sense to me for jazz standards since they're harmonic movements and a relative melody rather than a tune per sé.

In this system you'd have:

Do - 1
Re - 2
Mi - 3
Fa - 4
So - 5
la - 6
ti - 7

So then something like a Mib (mi-flat) would be a minor third and extending from that a chord notated as a Mib7#13 would be a 7#13 chord built from the minor third. Still a little odd to me but not completely illogical given the material.
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#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I doubt it's the fixed solfége system to be honest, it's more likely to be the relative version of the system so each of the do-re-mi and so on refers to intervals rather than specific notes.

Does kind of make sense to me for jazz standards since they're harmonic movements and a relative melody rather than a tune per sé.

In this system you'd have:

Do - 1
Re - 2
Mi - 3
Fa - 4
So - 5
la - 6
ti - 7

So then something like a Mib (mi-flat) would be a minor third and extending from that a chord notated as a Mib7#13 would be a 7#13 chord built from the minor third. Still a little odd to me but not completely illogical given the material.

Some people in Europe do use a fixed solfège, ( ) so it's quite possible that it's the case in this instance.
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#9
Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Si(-Do) C-D-E-F-G-A-B(-C)

So if they tell you to play "un Do" play the C (major) chord.

I'm pretty sure it's the fixed solfege system, I'm from Latin America and I never used the relative one.
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#10
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