#1
I am trying to play the beat it solo by van halen when I try to do the tap harmonic at the very start I am not getting the right sound any tips :S?
#2
Well, I don't know the solo, but if its an octave up, just tap over the actual fret wire an octave up (or however much it is). Gain helps too.
Where's Waldo?
#4
just doodle around and try ot find the right harmonics, and as soon as you find the correct harmonic try to memorize were its at... that way you can acces it quicklyyy.... (:::::
#6
What MaddMann said... hammer the fret 12 frets above... Eddie is the king of the 12 frets above harmonic tap.
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#7
isn't it much easier to have your finger already over the harmonic? that's how i've alwways done them and it dosen't seem to sound much different
#8
Not really because your fretting a note at the time. 5 t(17) for example, How you gonna have your finger there? 5 and 17? Nope. Not much hope, so tap it is.
#9
Quote by teh_goon
isn't it much easier to have your finger already over the harmonic? that's how i've alwways done them and it dosen't seem to sound much different

Do you mean your fretting hand is pressing lightly as if to play a harmonic or that your picking hand is already against the octave when you pick the note?

In the latter case, that's essentially a technique that is analogous to pinch harmonics and is used more often among acoustic and classical players than electric guitarists. That is essentially the same thing, but you're playing the note as a harmonic to start with, as opposing to modifying an already existing note to sound as a harmonic (as is the case with tapping the harmonic).
#11
To play a tapped harmonic you hold down a note with your left hand (lets say the 5th fret) then play 12 frets above that by lightly tapping the 17th fret. Dont actully press down the fret since then you would be tapping an octave, just a light touch on the 17th fret should do it.