#2
I don't believe so. All notes are written with reference to the key signature, and with accidentals being an out-of-key note, each individual accidental would have to be marked as such. If an accidental were to be followed in replacement of the in-key note, it would be simpler to just change the key signature to accommodate for it.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
Quote by AlanHB
I don't believe so. All notes are written with reference to the key signature, and with accidentals being an out-of-key note, each individual accidental would have to be marked as such. If an accidental were to be followed in replacement of the in-key note, it would be simpler to just change the key signature to accommodate for it.


right.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
right.


Party on! I was really expecting to be corrected based on my extremely limited knowledge of notation (can't read/write).
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Yeah, as Alan said you'd need another accidental.

If you didn't want the higher note to be sharpened/flattened it's customary to write a bracketed natural sign (or #/b depending on the key sig) to avoid confusion. Failure to do this could be considered bad practice.
#6
Always better to renotate accidentals (or cancel them) in all octaves

Now if you're talking about reading accidentals from a score, thats problematic beause different composers and time periods had different practices with regard to them. I would consult another edition and see what it has to say. If that fails, see what works with the harmony of that particular point
#7
Are you guys certain about that? IIRC, doesn't an accidental apply to all of the same notes before the next barline? Sometimes accidentals are rewritten for courtesy, but I don't think you need to put an accidental before every out-of-key note in a bar, just the first one. Once you hit the next bar it's cancelled out.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#8
Quote by Instrumetal
Are you guys certain about that? IIRC, doesn't an accidental apply to all of the same notes before the next barline? Sometimes accidentals are rewritten for courtesy, but I don't think you need to put an accidental before every out-of-key note in a bar, just the first one. Once you hit the next bar it's cancelled out.


if you're in the key of Bb major and write an Ab in the second space of the treble staff, then put a note on the first ledger line above the staff, it would be an A natural.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Quote by Instrumetal
Are you guys certain about that? IIRC, doesn't an accidental apply to all of the same notes before the next barline? Sometimes accidentals are rewritten for courtesy, but I don't think you need to put an accidental before every out-of-key note in a bar, just the first one. Once you hit the next bar it's cancelled out.

It depends on the period in which the piece was written. I think (though I may be wrong) baroque music was written as such, but from the late classical period onward, I think the use of "courtesy" accidentals became so common that it became standard practice to notate all different octave positions with courtesy accidentals. Thus not rewriting the accidental was frowned upon and for modern interpretation leads some people to think those that aren't marked are back to the original key signature, which is some cases is true.

Incidentally, in Finale, you are required to notate accidentals in every octave. If you notate a simultaneous octave and only make the top one flat, it will sound a major 7th. Same situation if you only mark a particular octave of a passage and the voice then sounds the same note an octave below: without an accidental, finale reads it as back to the original signature.


So it varies, long story short, avoid as much confusion as possible: write courtesy accidentals, just in case
#10
Quote by AeolianWolf
if you're in the key of Bb major and write an Ab in the second space of the treble staff, then put a note on the first ledger line above the staff, it would be an A natural.


Ah ok I see what you're saying.. what I meant was if you were in Bb, played an Ab, then C above Bb and then another Ab, you wouldn't need to put an accidental before it, correct?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#11
I've learned that an accidental keeps its value until the bar ends for all notes on that line. So to be more specific: if it's an octave higher or lower (and in the same bar) you normally don't play the accidental.

But as nmitchell076 says. Some composers don't follow that rule. Mind that it could be a typo.
If the piece has a basic chord scheme, the octave is probably with an accidental too. If it has chords out of the scale, you'll need to use your ears.

Quote by Instrumetal
Ah ok I see what you're saying.. what I meant was if you were in Bb, played an Ab, then C above Bb and then another Ab, you wouldn't need to put an accidental before it, correct?

If on the same line and same bar, yes. If different bar or higher or lower, no.
lalala
#12
Quote by Instrumetal
Ah ok I see what you're saying.. what I meant was if you were in Bb, played an Ab, then C above Bb and then another Ab, you wouldn't need to put an accidental before it, correct?


if that Ab is the same Ab as notated before, then yes. you're right.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#13
The rule with accidentals on the same line is that they are notated once and that they will continue to be played as accidentals until the end of the bar.

I think it would be notational good manners to re-notate an accidental if were an octave above or below in the same bar, which is what the original question was.

Manners maketh the notater.... eth.
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
Last edited by 91RG350 at Jul 20, 2011,
#14
A sign indicating a momentary departure from the key signature by raising or lowering a note.an accidental is a note whose pitch (or pitch class) is not a member of a scale or mode indicated by the most recently applied key signature. In musical notation, the symbols used to mark such notes, sharps (♯, flats (♭, and naturals (♮, may also be called accidentals. An accidental sign raises or lowers the following note from its normal pitch, usually by a semitone, although microtonal music may use An accident is a specific, unpredictable, unusual and unintended external action which occurs in a particular time and place, with no apparent and deliberate cause but with marked effects. It implies a generally negative outcome which may have been avoided or prevented had circumstances leading up to the accident been recognized, and acted upon, prior to its occurrence.
#15
Quote by josefpeter
A sign indicating a momentary departure from the key signature by raising or lowering a note.an accidental is a note whose pitch (or pitch class) is not a member of a scale or mode indicated by the most recently applied key signature. In musical notation, the symbols used to mark such notes, sharps (♯, flats (♭, and naturals (♮, may also be called accidentals. An accidental sign raises or lowers the following note from its normal pitch, usually by a semitone, although microtonal music may use An accident is a specific, unpredictable, unusual and unintended external action which occurs in a particular time and place, with no apparent and deliberate cause but with marked effects. It implies a generally negative outcome which may have been avoided or prevented had circumstances leading up to the accident been recognized, and acted upon, prior to its occurrence.


Ain't Google cool?


This technique that you have used is known as "forum commenting" so that you can get back links through your sig. So, you think quoting a Google definition in the forum will obscure the fact that you arent adding anything meaningful to this conversation, and are merely promoting a link in your sig. Really? The creativity that you'll go to to make sure people see your back links.

Have a great day.

Best,

Sean
#16
Quote by Sean0913
Ain't Google cool?


This technique that you have used is known as "forum commenting" so that you can get back links through your sig. So, you think quoting a Google definition in the forum will obscure the fact that you arent adding anything meaningful to this conversation, and are merely promoting a link in your sig. Really? The creativity that you'll go to to make sure people see your back links.

Have a great day.

Best,

Sean


not to mention he defined both "accidental" and "accident".
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.