#1
So a few months ago I realised my Epiphone Les Paul's intonation was totally out as I'd never changed it before. I set it all straight, all except one string, the G string (or actually F because I play in D standard tuning). The 12th fretted note was still a little higher than the open string despite having moved the saddle as far back as it goes.

Now I figured I'd wait til I get new strings, I thought the problem might go away but having just changed them, it hasn't. If it makes any difference the new strings are EB Beefy Slinky and the old ones were EB Skinny Top Heavy Bottom. I don't think that has anything to do with it though because all the other strings were easily set straight.

Anyway are there any fixes for this? Also it's not just a little off, it's like 12 cents too high. It's really annoying having to tune that one string differently depending on what part of the string I'm playing on while recording.
#2
adjust intonation at the bridge. Changing strings will have no effect on intonation, unless you are changing the gauge. There should be little screws near the string saddle that lets you move that saddle backwards or forwards.
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#3
Quote by stonyman65
adjust intonation at the bridge. Changing strings will have no effect on intonation, unless you are changing the gauge. There should be little screws near the string saddle that lets you move that saddle backwards or forwards.


Yes that's what I've been doing, however the saddle is as far back as it can go for this string and it is still too high on the fretted note.
#4
Quote by stonyman65
adjust intonation at the bridge. Changing strings will have no effect on intonation, unless you are changing the gauge. There should be little screws near the string saddle that lets you move that saddle backwards or forwards.

Lol, did you even read the message? It was clearly stated that the saddle is already as far back as it goes.

As for the actual problem, I'm sorry, I don't know a specific cure - it happens to me occasionally, as well. Having the overall setup done well might help - see that the truss rod is adjusted correctly and that the nut is properly cut for your string gauge. Putting on thicker strings - like the beefy slinkys - may well help, as I think a .10-.52 is too light for D standard.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#5
Probably need to fiddle with your truss rod. Make sure to read about how to do it before doing it. You can seriously mess up your neck.
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