#1
Ok so I might be able to get a job that pays 30 dollars an hour to teach "children" guitar. They told me to call to set up an interview and I'm extremely nervous! The reason I'm putting this in guitar techniques is because I'd like to know what skills should I show to the employer for an interview? She's a piano teacher that's been playing for over 30 years and graduated with a bachelor of music degree from a really nice university so I think she will know if I suck or not.

Im not sure if I should concentrate on techniques or theory. I really do want to start teaching guitar because Ive taught beginners before and the grin they get when they learn their first song is really satisfactory to me, im extremely patient when it comes to people not getting it when playing guitar, and getting paid 30 dollars to do something I love to do is more then enough for motivation.

Well anyway if you were some prestigious pianist that's going to hire a guitarist what would sell you on hiring someone? Lots of theory? Perfect technique? A good personality?
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#2
A good demonstration of both will be good. That way you could work with her and do it the way she wants you to do it.

More important though, you need to show that you're a good teacher no matter what the subject matter. Be friendly and patient, but also be very clear and be able to explain things in a number of different ways.
#3
usually pianists love theory... Perhaps she'll ask you some stuff, idk.
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#4
I hope you know some theory, your major scales at least. Cause if shes anything like my theory teacher (he's been a pianist for 20 years) he considers guitarists not musicians until they learn what it is they are playing.

Kinda elitist but he's an amazing teacher.
#6
Ok thanks guys! So I should mix theory with technique, don't worry I have a grasp on basic theory lol I definitely know more then just the major scales. I'll just try to be enthusiastic as possible about teaching because I think this lady will be big on theory so I'll tell her what I know hopefully it'll be enough.
Gear
- Synyster Schecter Standard
- Peavey Vyper 15

I'm currently using Cubase 5 for any recording purposes.
#7
Quote by Vendetta V
oh i read your thread now Mr. Mike, i'm sorry but we'll have to cancel the interview, we got our answers here already


so long bitches...
Shit... Ive been caught.
Gear
- Synyster Schecter Standard
- Peavey Vyper 15

I'm currently using Cubase 5 for any recording purposes.
#8
Quote by sandyman323
A good demonstration of both will be good. That way you could work with her and do it the way she wants you to do it.

More important though, you need to show that you're a good teacher no matter what the subject matter. Be friendly and patient, but also be very clear and be able to explain things in a number of different ways.

I must've skimmed over your post because I didn't notice the second part but this is something I didn't think through very much, different ways to teach the same thing. This might save me later on thanks for the tip!
Gear
- Synyster Schecter Standard
- Peavey Vyper 15

I'm currently using Cubase 5 for any recording purposes.
#9
One thing:

How well you can play doesn't matter.

As a teacher your most necessary skill is communication. Show that you can effectively communicate ideas and concepts without complicating the information or wasting time. If you can do that then concentrate on theory, correct theory is one of the hardest things to learn without a teacher so that should be your focus as a teacher in my opinion. Obviously you need some physical aptitude but really, if you can't communicate what you're teaching effectively then none of it matters.
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#10
As has been touched upon, it's all about how you teach.

It won't matter too much if you focus on technique or theory (though if you make it known you have a solid grounding in both they won't be left wondering whether or not you know the right stuff!) it's all about how good you are at actually teaching.

As you say, you've taught before, which is good, if you're anything like me, your first few lessons teaching will have been a bit of a shambles in terms of communication and getting the ideas across (I accidentally started talking about roots, thirds and fifths when teaching a complete beginner their first chords...whoops! ), so it's good to know you've probably found your footing when it comes to teaching people.

But yeah, all you can do is focus on putting across that you can teach well.
Don't focus on one specific area, make sure you get the idea that you know your stuff and can communicate said stuff in an appropriate manner. you should be fine from there!

Wish I could find such a job to be honest.
#11
Yeah, basically it's all about your ability to convey the very basics of guitar playing - single string riffs, simple melodies, maybe some powerchords and open chord songs - and do it in a fun and engaging way.

I very much doubt serious theory or technique will come into it, but you might want to ask your interviewer if the school prefers students to learn from a particular method book or if they want the pupils to learn to read music.
#12
The main thing I'm sure they are looking for is if you can teach.
If you are patient and kind when it comes to teaching kids you'll go a long way.
How much you know isn't really That important because chances are they will have you use a book to teach their students.