#1
Bear with me here as I'm not sure I am posting this in the right section.

I am looking at taking an Ibanez AS73 Artcore that is currently set up for standard tuning with a set of the Kerry King 10-46's and switching it up a little to play drop tunings, looking at D and Drop-C.

As I understand it here is the short list of what this will entail:
1. Change of string gauge, slightly heavier
2. Check the truss rod tension
3. Go over the intonation to make sure I'm not playing an F when I want an E (that would suck)
4. Perhaps have to file out the nut a bit from the change of strings

I am wondering if I am going about this the right way, if there are any suggestions from the crowd here at UG. I am also wondering if anyone can throw in their two cents on the string gauge issue. I usually play 10-46's in standard tuning, like I stated before.
#2
Yeah, you basically are, if your going to be playing in drop tuning constantly you should adjust the truss rod IF it needs it which it might not.
Unless you change the string gauge to 12's or 13's you don't really need to refile the nut.
And you should check the intonation but I don't think that it will be that off, as long as theres not severe problems with the intonation I'd leave it.
As for the string gauge I use 10's on my grestch (standard) then 11's on almost everything else I have in standard, I'd recommend 11's or 12's for D or drop C.

And for future reference unless your repainting your guitar or doing serious modding like putting a distortion unit in your guitar or something of that nature these kind of threads go in the electric guitar forum.
Guitars:
LTD F-50
Yamaha EG-112
'77 Harmony
Roadworn Starcaster
Gretsch G5120

Amps:
Vypyr 15
Epiphone Valve Junior combo
#3
Well, depending on preference of string make, Ernie Ball make a few set's perfect for drop tuning. Beefy Slinkys (11-54) and Not Even Slinkys (12-54). They would be a good gauge to go for.

As far as the way you're working this, you seem to have it all right. Of course, the best advice I'll give for setting up for thicker strings is to Stop, Look, and Listen. Meaning, make sure it looks sane, and check that it sounds good.
Make sure you work in small steps as well, otherwise you'll be going back and forth for ages trying to find your sweet spots.
#5
I think it'd be more a habit than i fetish. A fetish is sexual. And scares me thinking of what you may do with your guitar... What your doing though seems right.

Cheers
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#6
I threw it up with the word fetish more because I love the comination of a hollow body electric and drop-c, to the point where I might consider doing weird things to the guitar.

Thank you for the input everyone.