#1
This is a slightly odd thread title i know, but I'm getting started in making music and trying to work out the anatomy of a typical drum n bass track. I'm really struggling to make it all out and work out what's playing.

I get that the bassline is all important, but this is not like a bass track in a rock record right? Is it usually pitch shifted down? And am I correct in saying that the same part is often played higher up at the same time? Are there lots of notes in a typical bar? Do the notes even change at all from bar to bar or is it the rhythm that is more important? (so any chord structure would just come from accompanying synths?)

And what about the drums. Are kick drum type sounds used at all, or does the bassline just handle the whole low end? The typical dnb snare drum sound doesn't sound like a real one: is it pitch shifted? Distorted?

I know how to use synths, but should i be using noise waveforms, squares, sines or what for each of the key parts?

I know that this is the wrong way to come at it and i should just make what sounds I want to hear, but working out what they are doing this way could take a long time.

Any help much appreciated. I previously posted this in artists: other and apologise for the spam.
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#2
It's bad music.
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#4
Okay, this is a very interesting question. From what experience I have of DnB (very little) I can assume that the sounds you hear are most often synthisysed versions of the proper instrument. This is why your snare sounds odd as it is a copy, closer to that of a clap. A good way to try your hand at making this music is to download a program called fruityloops as it has samples of multiple instruments and is alot of fun to just sit and play with. I use it to create drum tracks to practice guitar with, but an ex flatmate made music with it. I hope this helped a little
#5
I get that the bassline is all important, but this is not like a bass track in a rock record right?

It's usually a synth

And am I correct in saying that the same part is often played higher up at the same time?

I'm sure some artists have done that, but it's not too common in drum n bass

Are there lots of notes in a typical bar? Do the notes even change at all from bar to bar

I don't think this can really be answered about any genre, artists can do what they want.

And what about the drums. Are kick drum type sounds used at all, or does the bassline just handle the whole low end?

It's usually a synthesized kick

The typical dnb snare drum sound doesn't sound like a real one: is it pitch shifted? Distorted?

It's pretty common to layer multiple drum sounds to make one big sound, sometimes they are synthesized as well

I know how to use synths, but should i be using noise waveforms, squares, sines or what for each of the key parts?

You can do whatever you want, but it's generally not as simple as that.


You should really start by listening to some drum n bass...


TL;DR: Just listen to some drum n bass and you can figure out most of what I just said
Last edited by 37 Narwhals at Jul 20, 2011,
#6
Well, i've been listening to it for years and I can't really work it out.

Is the bassline at the normal pitch of a bass guitar? Someone can surely tell me that at least?

I don't want to use samples because I'm trying to make my own.
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