#1
Alright, so I came up with this riff the other day. Now, im pretty crappy at guitar i'll admit
but I was hoping someone could help point me in the right direction when it comes to write a solo or something leadish for this. The song has kind of a dark theme to it so im not looking for a solo that's particularly upbeat if you get me. If anyone can help it'd be much appreciated!
Attachments:
Work In progress.gp5
#3
First of all, this song is in 6/8. It came out as 4/4 in TuxGuitar, but the program doesn't convert other file types very well, so I don't know if you actually made the change.

Anyway, look at the chords you're working with and go from there. Good solos use the idea of tension and release. Build tension, then release. We can't hold your hand for you, but start working with your major/minor scales around the chords and expand it outwards.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#5
Quote by soviet_ska
First of all, this song is in 6/8. It came out as 4/4 in TuxGuitar, but the program doesn't convert other file types very well, so I don't know if you actually made the change.


Has more of a 3 beat feel to me... 3/4 time signature (though it could sound sweet in 6/8 too). Remember 6/8 has 6 eighth notes with 2 'beats' where 3/4 has 6 eighth notes with 3 'beats'.

The whole riff is in the key of Dm. Noodle with the notes in the key and if you come up with a phrase that you like, write it down and keep it in your repertoire.
#6
Quote by Peeex
Has more of a 3 beat feel to me... 3/4 time signature (though it could sound sweet in 6/8 too). Remember 6/8 has 6 eighth notes with 2 'beats' where 3/4 has 6 eighth notes with 3 'beats'.


I would disagree; the accents (double-stops) are spaced neatly into dotted-quarter notes. In my eyes, this is about as standard a 6/8 pattern as you get, but I can't say your idea is wrong--especially without more context from other instruments or further development of sections.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#7
Quote by Peeex

The whole riff is in the key of Dm. Noodle with the notes in the key and if you come up with a phrase that you like, write it down and keep it in your repertoire.



Right, you are chugging in D so start with the D minor Pentatonic for your leads.
Last edited by dopelope at Jul 21, 2011,
#8
Try focussing the solo on the notes of the chords.
For example first one is D to F minor third.
Try screwing around in the notes of D minor, D F A still use the other notes of the D minor scale.
Then it switches to a major second, that would most likely be a sus2 so try doing something with the notes of Dsus2 and maybe Dminor D E F A.
etc etc.
Use these notes as the most important ones.
Like a run over that d min that goes like.

E---------10 h-13-----
B------10----------
G--10------------------
D--------------------
A---------------------
E----------------------
Thats a D minor triad assuming your still in the Dmin3rd section play something cool descending.
Keep in mind land on a note of the D minor chord.
Or you could ascend With a run like:
E---15 13 12--------------15 13 12
B----------------15 13 11--------------15 13 12 ------------
G--------
Then ofcourse movig further.
#9
Quote by dopelope
Right, you are chugging in D so start with the D minor Pentatonic for your leads. You can also try leads from the relative major.(F major)

Actually, it's just D minor (and it's pentatonic). Yes, Dm and F share the same notes, but because TS is in the key of Dm, all of the notes come from Dm, not F. In order to use the F major scale, TS would have to be in the key of F.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


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#10
Quote by rockingamer2
Actually, it's just D minor (and it's pentatonic). Yes, Dm and F share the same notes, but because TS is in the key of Dm, all of the notes come from Dm, not F. In order to use the F major scale, TS would have to be in the key of F.



I guess it just depends on the way its used. Usually if I'm improvising over a backing track I can get a way with playing either the Minor or relative major. It still fits.
#11
Quote by dopelope
I guess it just depends on the way its used. Usually if I'm improvising over a backing track I can get a way with playing either the Minor or relative major. It still fits.

If a backing track is in G, then your playing in the key of G, using notes from the G major scale (and accidentals). You can use shapes you associate with E minor, but your actually playing the G major scale, because the harmony behind it dictates it as such.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
Last edited by rockingamer2 at Jul 20, 2011,
#12
Thanks for all the great tips guys and keep 'em flowing if you can!
Yarr!
#13
Quote by dopelope
I guess it just depends on the way its used. Usually if I'm improvising over a backing track I can get a way with playing either the Minor or relative major. It still fits.


nope, that's just because you don't understand what you're doing.

if your track is in D major, you play in D major. you can play the pattern you think is B minor, but you're still playing D major.

this is why you generally see us putting down the "patterns only" method, because unless you have a background in theory, you're going to be misled.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#14
Quote by rockingamer2
If a backing track is in G, then your playing in the key of G, using notes from the G major scale (and accidentals). You can use shapes you associate with E minor, but your actually playing the G major scale, because the harmony behind it dictates it as such.


Got ya. My theory is lacking(obviously) so I appreciate you being able to explain it to me.
#15
Quote by AeolianWolf
nope, that's just because you don't understand what you're doing.

if your track is in D major, you play in D major. you can play the pattern you think is B minor, but you're still playing D major.

this is why you generally see us putting down the "patterns only" method, because unless you have a background in theory, you're going to be misled.


Got it now. Just like the other guy said but a different example. Unfortunately the "pattern" method was the easiest and fastest way for me to pick up and learn because I just wanted to hurry up and play. I'd like to learn a little more theory its just so damn complicated. I appreciate any advice and pointers I can get from you guys to keep me from sounding like such an amateur.