#1
I've been recording some drums and I have been having some problems with mic bleed mostly just on the snare drum mic. It's picking up a lot of the ride and crash cymbols and its making it hard to mix right. What can i do to prevent so much bleed from the cymbols...
Gear
Guitars-
Paul Reed Smith SE Custom
Paul Reed Smith Mike Mushok Baritone
Squire Bullet
Carlos Acoustic
Epiphone Banjo
Amps-
Mesa Boogie DC-5
B-52 LS-100 and Matching cab
and tons of miscellaneous stuff
#2
Placement is your best bet. Also using the right mic. Example: An omni directional is a bad choice for a snare while a cardioid is a good choice.

Mic bleed is what makes real drums sound real. There will always be some, and in most cases, it will be fine in the mix. If you place the right mics in the right spots, you wont have to worry about it much.
#3
Heh, I actually did a lot of work with improving a shitty drum track with lots of bleed. I had to do a ton of editing of the track. Basically, I had to edit out the space between hits to reduce bleed. Its not going to make it sound perfect but it makes an unusuable track useable. Also, you could use Drumagog (my new favorite )
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#4
Im using an SM57 which I thought would be a good choice haha.. but I dont have the time to edit that much of the drum track
Gear
Guitars-
Paul Reed Smith SE Custom
Paul Reed Smith Mike Mushok Baritone
Squire Bullet
Carlos Acoustic
Epiphone Banjo
Amps-
Mesa Boogie DC-5
B-52 LS-100 and Matching cab
and tons of miscellaneous stuff
#5
That's a good mic choice for snares. Where are you placing it? The only snare mic bleed that is ever a problem for me is with the hi hat. I'm not sure how you're picking up enough ride and crash to be a problem unless that kit is set up really weird.
#6
Im putting it over the left side aimed down and right for the middle of the snare
Gear
Guitars-
Paul Reed Smith SE Custom
Paul Reed Smith Mike Mushok Baritone
Squire Bullet
Carlos Acoustic
Epiphone Banjo
Amps-
Mesa Boogie DC-5
B-52 LS-100 and Matching cab
and tons of miscellaneous stuff
#7
Don't worry about it. Add a Noise Gate in your DAW.

Set the noise gate to a level where the cymbals don't come through, but the snare does.
Sure placement and mic selection are important, but a basic SM57 on the snare will give you bleed...

...and plenty of fantastic albums have been recorded that way. Nothing wrong with that technique. Gate it out!
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#9
Snare, generally, should be gated (as described above) and compressed.

The gated, compressed sound is then mixed with the overheads, and voila! The snare stands out in the mix.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#10
If you gate your snare, be very careful with it. If it's metal and the drummer is just beating the crap out of the snare, it's easier, but for other more dynamic styles you have to make sure you don't miss any ghost notes. Also pay attention to the relationship between the snare and hi hat mic. Often the hi hat bleeds into the snare and overheads enough that an extra hat mic is barely needed. If suddenly the snare mic goes silent with the gate, you could notice it in the hat.

All that to say go ahead and try gating, but be careful.
#11
USE
YOUR
EARS.

If it doesn't sound right, then fix it.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."