#1
Ok so I've ran into this problem ever time I've made a movie. I will eventually run into working on a day where the wind sucks and totally distorts the audio. The bad thing is it is present all over the audio. I always have to cut a ton of low end and doctor the rest so at least some is audible. Then I use a reverb to at least widen the little audio I still have. It sounds better but does anyone know a better way to correct this?
#2
I'm no expert in this and have never studied or looked into this really, but isn't all the speech in films dubbed in a studio after, and they just use the on-set audio to guide the actors when they do their voice-overs, and the movement of their mouths in the video makes it easier to fit the voice-overs to the footage?
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#3
well you could do it the way the pros do it. Replace almost all, if not all the audio. To get good background noise, just record 2 minutes of silence at the location of the shot.

Other than that, get a wind screen. If you cant find one that fits I'm sure you could buy any of them and rig it to work. It wont be perfect, but it will definitely cut down on the wind noise some.
#4
Quote by sandyman323
well you could do it the way the pros do it. Replace almost all, if not all the audio. To get good background noise, just record 2 minutes of silence at the location of the shot.

Other than that, get a wind screen. If you cant find one that fits I'm sure you could buy any of them and rig it to work. It wont be perfect, but it will definitely cut down on the wind noise some.

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#5
yeah man, record a sample of the background. Learn the tricks to recording like the "walla" for group talking scenes, building the background noises, ect.

Thats the best way to do it. Honestly i wouldnt know what to to pull the wind out of a track.