#1
i found a fourmla that would work on all half diminished 7th chords on the fretboard, but i realize just how the finger placement is, will be very uncomfortable to hold that chord, so is it possible if someone can give me a comfortable finger placement fourmla for half diminshed 7th chords.

Thank You
#3
Quote by DiminishedFifth

E---
B-8-
G-7-
D-8-
A-7-
E---


Em7b5

If you wanted to make it fully diminished, just lower the D a semi-tone. Easy moveable shape.


Look at his name: he, of all people, should know.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
Quote by DiminishedFifth

E---
B-8-
G-7-
D-8-
A-7-
E---


Em7b5

If you wanted to make it fully diminished, just lower the D a semi-tone. Easy moveable shape.


ty, im not fimmliar with chord names like em7b5 yet but im gueseing its an e half diminished chord, ty and thanks for the help for a fully diminshed one, i already had one but this one will be easier, thank you bro
#5
Quote by harvestkingx
ty, im not fimmliar with chord names like em7b5 yet but im gueseing its an e half diminished chord [...]


Yep. I suppose it's a popular notation in Internet discussions since we don't have the crossed-out degree sign that would normally symbolize half-diminished.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
Quote by harvestkingx
ty, im not fimmliar with chord names like em7b5 yet but im gueseing its an e half diminished chord, ty and thanks for the help for a fully diminshed one, i already had one but this one will be easier, thank you bro


Yup, Eø and Em7(b5) are exactly the same thing

I totally rate the half diminished sign should be added as a smiley/character or something, I had to copy the one I used above from wikipedia
#8
Keep in mind that what you're asking for is a more comfortable voicing for the chord.. but different voicings have different character to them. The one DiminishedFifth gave you is a good one that sounds pretty stable as well, but you'll improve yourself as a musician immensely by trying to learn several different voicings for this same chord. If you can become comfortable with the one that was giving you trouble, you'll have twice as many options right off that bat.

As well, I understand that discomfort when playing complicated chord shapes is discouraging, but it would be advisable to power through it and become more familiar with it. Ultimately you're going to want to learn things like this one day, may as well start now. Remember how tough barre chords were at first?
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#10
Quote by Instrumetal
Keep in mind that what you're asking for is a more comfortable voicing for the chord.. but different voicings have different character to them. The one DiminishedFifth gave you is a good one that sounds pretty stable as well, but you'll improve yourself as a musician immensely by trying to learn several different voicings for this same chord. If you can become comfortable with the one that was giving you trouble, you'll have twice as many options right off that bat.

As well, I understand that discomfort when playing complicated chord shapes is discouraging, but it would be advisable to power through it and become more familiar with it. Ultimately you're going to want to learn things like this one day, may as well start now. Remember how tough barre chords were at first?



I compelety understand and i will try to do that ty for you advice, the reason why i come to this fourm is to get some good pointers , so ty. and your right about the barre chords.
#11
Quote by harvestkingx
I compelety understand and i will try to do that ty for you advice, the reason why i come to this fourm is to get some good pointers , so ty. and your right about the barre chords.



the Mi7b5 is a very flexable chord..and a very good one to learn fully...as it can have many functions...learn all the inversions of it and be amazed how flexable it can really be...the mi7b5 is also a 9th chord-no root..also a Mi6th chord..also a 7b9th#5 chord-no root

so..Emi7b5=C9=Gmi6=Ab7b9#5

depending on how it functions it could convey minor or dominate qualities

play well

wolf
#12
actually i havent learned 9th chords yet, i learning on ricci adams music theory .net, they havent showed me that yet, if not then ill ask this fourm what they are.
#13
Quote by DiminishedFifth


I might go and sig this... maybe.


If you have the space, do it.

What are the degree formulas for 7th Diminished and Half Diminished chords?

Half Diminished would be 1-b3-b5-b7, right?

And Full Diminished would end up as 1-b3-b5-6, right?

These are what I got from the chord DiminishedFifth gave and his explanation of how to make it full diminished.
#14
Quote by Life Is Brutal
What are the degree formulas for 7th Diminished and Half Diminished chords?

Half Diminished would be 1-b3-b5-b7, right?

Yes.

And Full Diminished would end up as 1-b3-b5-6, right?

No! But you do get partial credit for enharmonic tones

1 - b3 - b5 - bb7

What you have right now would be a Xdim6 chord.

Notice it's called a Diminished 7th chord. That's be cause the 7th is diminished, rather than flat (also because of the quality of the chord).
#16
Quote by DiminishedFifth
What you have right now would be a Xdim6 chord.

1 b3 b5 6 is dim6? If it's a dim chord then why is the 6 intact? Wikipedia says that "dim" means that each of the intervals is flattened. Isn't this true or am I missing something
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#17
Quote by Flibo
1 b3 b5 6 is dim6? If it's a dim chord then why is the 6 intact? Wikipedia says that "dim" means that each of the intervals is flattened. Isn't this true or am I missing something

Cause it would be a M6 on top of a Diminished chord. Basically being a sixth chord with a diminished "base".
#20
It doesn't exist. Those intervals are above a bass note that is a first inversion Dim7th.

It's like saying what do you call a chord which is 1 2 #4 6

It's a 3rd inversion 7th. You wouldn't call it 6sus2#11.
#21
Quote by griffRG7321
It doesn't exist. Those intervals are above a bass note that is a first inversion Dim7th.


And diminished chords often appear in first inversion... .
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#22
Quote by soviet_ska
And diminished chords often appear in first inversion... .


...yes.
#23
Quote by griffRG7321
It doesn't exist. Those intervals are above a bass note that is a first inversion Dim7th.

It's like saying what do you call a chord which is 1 2 #4 6

It's a 3rd inversion 7th. You wouldn't call it 6sus2#11.

If that's the case, then why do 6th chords exist? They're just 7th chords in first inversion.

I'm not arguing it's use, I just do think it exists insofar as theory is concerned.
#24
It depends upon context. It's a C6 if the C is in the bass and it's Am7 if the A note is in the bass or if simply more major or minor sound is inferred within the context of the preceding and following harmonic lines.
I'd imagine it's the same thing with dim or half-dim chords.
Hark! Is that a mellotron I hear?
#25
Quote by DiminishedFifth
If that's the case, then why do 6th chords exist? They're just 7th chords in first inversion.

I'm not arguing it's use, I just do think it exists insofar as theory is concerned.


6th chords (when they are 6th chords, which isn't very often) are called because of a certain context.

Diminished 7ths are symmetrical chords and each inversion has it's own context.

Under no circumstances would it correct to call a chord 'Dim6'.
#27
look up "Drop 2's on guitar"
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