#1
Someone explain to me how exactly I line each up? I'm just teaching myself music theory and feel like a goon after thinking for a few weeks that E major's harmonic minor was C minor, but indeed its C#. Why not C?
#2
Because the relative minor of E major is C# minor, not C minor.
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#3
Quote by FlexEXP
Someone explain to me how exactly I line each up? I'm just teaching myself music theory and feel like a goon after thinking for a few weeks that E major's harmonic minor was C minor, but indeed its C#. Why not C?


C minor goes with Eb, and C# goes with E. there is no C in E major -- so why would it be C?
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#4
When I first started learning this stuff in terms of putting it into use (I didn't know much about theory) I just remembered that if I'm playing G major the harmonic minor if four frets down, E (minor of course). I understand this is a very primitive way to see this but it worked whilst I was playing.

If you write down all the notes in G major, then all the notes in E minor, they're all the same, hence it's harmonic minor. This has nothing to do with major/minor thirds.
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Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


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#5
Quote by FlexEXP
Someone explain to me how exactly I line each up? I'm just teaching myself music theory and feel like a goon after thinking for a few weeks that E major's harmonic minor was C minor, but indeed its C#. Why not C?

Because the root of the relative minor starts on the 6th step. The 6th step of E Major is C#.

You have to know your scales/key sigs really well.
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#6
Quote by charlie__flynn
When I first started learning this stuff in terms of putting it into use (I didn't know much about theory) I just remembered that if I'm playing G major the harmonic minor if four frets down, E (minor of course). I understand this is a very primitive way to see this but it worked whilst I was playing.

If you write down all the notes in G major, then all the notes in E minor, they're all the same, hence it's harmonic minor. This has nothing to do with major/minor thirds.


i don't know who taught you this, but this entire post is completely wrong.

first off, the relative minor is three frets down (a minor third) from the relative major, not four (a major third). (though i honestly think you just miscalculated or just misspoke since you got the notes right anyway.) the relative minor also has NOTHING to do with why it's called harmonic minor.

second, G major and E harmonic minor do not contain the same notes. E harmonic minor contains a D#. G major and E natural minor would contain the same notes.

you might want to backtrack what you know about this. and give harmonic minor a google.
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#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
i don't know who taught you this, but this entire post is completely wrong.

first off, the relative minor is three frets down (a minor third) from the relative major, not four (a major third). (though i honestly think you just miscalculated or just misspoke since you got the notes right anyway.) the relative minor also has NOTHING to do with why it's called harmonic minor.

second, G major and E harmonic minor do not contain the same notes. E harmonic minor contains a D#. G major and E natural minor would contain the same notes.

you might want to backtrack what you know about this. and give harmonic minor a google.


This.
#9
Quote by FlexEXP
Someone explain to me how exactly I line each up? I'm just teaching myself music theory and feel like a goon after thinking for a few weeks that E major's harmonic minor was C minor, but indeed its C#. Why not C?


*Relative Minor.NOT harmonic minor, that is a different scale with different notes all together.
#10
That's where I messed up. I was thinking six degrees straight down without considering 6 degrees down in THAT particular key. d'oh! alphabetically speaking it would be C going from E, but in scale talk, its C#.