#1
Alright so I was given by a good friend 2 Audio-Technica M4000S mics and was going to be doing my home recording soon and seeing as they are both dynamic mics will I be able to use one as my instrument mic or would I need something else (Condenser mic maybe) and use these for vocals only? I like these mics they work well and do not have an extreme amount of cash so if I can use these that would be awesome but I might be able to get a new mic if needed. Just to clear things up do not say things like bashing the mics I have already, I was given them for free and they have worked extremely well so far. Thank you in advance.
#2
There's not really any "rules" when it comes to mic applications. You can use any type of mic for just about any occasion.
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#3
You can record vocals with dynamics, but sometimes the recording needs a large diaphram condenser mic to grab the entire frequency range of some vocals.

Dynamics are more commonly used on instruments (at least guitar and drums), although condensers can be used to capture room ambience on those instruments (usually on a parallel track to the dynamic tracks). Ribbon mics are also used on many instruments.

I don't know how that model compares to the Shure SM57 and SM58, but entire albums have been recorded with these mics.

Your genre will be a heavy factor, too.
Last edited by jetwash69 at Jul 21, 2011,
#4
Quote by gquady09
There's not really any "rules" when it comes to mic applications. You can use any type of mic for just about any occasion.

Correct, although generally speaking some guidelines do apply.


Quote by jetwash69
You can record vocals with dynamics, but sometimes the recording needs a large diaphram condenser mic to get up to the frequency range of some vocals.
What?! Ridiculous statement; do you seriously think any human can hear the pitch of a note above 15kHz (roughly where most dynamics roll-off) let alone sing a note so high?

Dynamics are more commonly used on instruments (at least guitar and drums), although condensers can be used to capture room ambience on those instruments (usually on a parallel track to the dynamic tracks). Ribbon mics are also used on many instruments.
Depends on the instruments - dynamics tend only to be used to close mic loud instruments, as they lack the detail of condensers. It's rare to use a dynamic mic on an acoustic instrument (excluding drums).

I don't know how that model compares to the Shure SM57 and SM58, but entire albums have been recorded with these mics.
SM57 and '58 are pretty much the last resort. 'well, nothing else worked so we may as well try it' mics of the studio world. They make great live mics, and '57 is great on snare, guitar cabs and on brass... but otherwise there are hundreds of mics I would rather use in most situations, and those are limited mainly by my memory for brands/models.


Your genre will be a heavy factor, too.

The truest thing in your post - this will likely affect what instrumentation you use and thusly, what mic setup will best achieve your desired sound.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jul 21, 2011,
#5
Thank you very much our music is mostly clean elcetric or acoustic fingerpicking and medium to high gain punk with a female vocalist who has a pertty large range. No drums but there is bass but no distortion for the bass and they play on the lower end of the spectrum.
#6
Those wouldn't be my first choice for recording an acoustic or vocals, but it's what you've got at the moment, so why not give it a shot? They're definitely good enough to get started and get some practice in if nothing else. If you like the sound then great, but if you want to spend money on a new mic I would suggest a large diaphragm condenser. They're generally considered better for acoustics and voices than dynamics especially for that kind of music. But really, you have some mics so why not get started now and see if you can get it up to your standard with what you have before dropping a chunk of money on something.
#7
ok this one probably should have been mentioned before. there are about 15 songs we are going to record and for one our bassist will be playing a piece on a piano with vocals behind it. we are still iffy on using the song in the album but if we decide to how do you best record a piano?
#8
What kind of piano? Upright? Baby? Grand?

Either way, dynamics would not be my first choice, but it's what you have so it's worth a shot. Your best bet is to google mic placement on a piano. There's a few different techniques for each of the different kinds of pianos. I've never done it, but I know you'll probably want one on the lower strings and one on the mid-high strings.
#9
I am a fan of applying a handful of mics to any particular track anyway, assuming I'm multitracking.

What could possibly be bad about miking (INSTRUMENT X) with a dynamic, small and large DC, ribbon, etc?

If you have the time and you have the mics, then what the heck?

There are also occasions where, in a shoot-out with some $12,000 tube ribbon kind of deal, the piece of crap from some kid's toy wins out for some reason.

There is no one right mic.
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#10
it is an upright piano. but as for the mics i just called a friend and he might let me use his old ribbon mic that he has for this project.
#11
Quote by cmc5890
it is an upright piano. but as for the mics i just called a friend and he might let me use his old ribbon mic that he has for this project.

Mic the soundboard. It's a giant piece of metal that amplifies all the sound.

You might have to open the piano up with a screwdriver. That's standard practice in the studio.

You'll know the soundboard when you see it. It's seriously, like 200lbs of metal. Probably half the weight of the damned piano!

Additionally you can mic the strings, the hammers, the keys, a pair of overheads, the room.

Three would be a good start, though:

Ribbon on the soundboard
Pair of small diaphragm condensers spaced wide and panned 100%*

*I space them wide, which is my preference from experience. Most people, it seems, space them very close or roughly as far apart as your ears are. I find that is not "stereo" enough - the sounds of the two mics are too similar.

Complexity is good!
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#12
Thanks for the amplification Goliath. That's pretty much what I meant, but you articulate it better. Kinda like the difference between a dynamic mic and a condenser--not a matter of frequency, but rather detail.