#1
Hi, I'm new. I'm pretty sure you guys knew that! ;D

I am a very creative person, and I love to express myself through music in all sorts of ways. I play guitar, keyboard, and a little bit of everything else. However, I feel like I never really feel like I can express myself in a satisfactory way.

I started really paying attention to vocals, and live performances of many different bands. I immediately knew that, that was where I could express myself the way that I needed to.

There is one main problem though. I CAN'T SING! This bugs me so much, and perhaps some people here can sympathize with me, but it is really frustrating when you want to express yourself in one way, and it comes out a totally different sounding way. Does that make sense?

In a nutshell, I am miserable, and I need help to become a better vocalist. I practice an hour and a half everyday, and feel like I have made a big improvement from where I started. (Which after listening to this clip of my cover of "Get out" by Circa Survive, may make you wonder how bad I was to start off with!) I need your help!

Thank you

Here's the clip:
http://www.mediafire.com/?vcva90qvhl8u1f4
#3
I am currently taking lessons, actually. I believe it has been three months since I started taking them. Critique would also help a lot.
#4
Its not bad man.A bit quiet, youre probably singing the quiet way, trying not to strain yourself at all, (sorry, cant really explain that part, im not a pro).But you have to let your voice out, make it strong and hearable, practice your vibrato and try to work on your higher notes because youre probably gonna need them a bit more, start learning songs a bit higher than this comfortable middle range of yours, and if it starts hurting to sing them, stop immediately and ask your teacher what youre doing wrong by demonstrating the painful parts.
#5
Thank you very much for the reply, and if you could, could you explain exactly how to let my voice out?
#6
As I said you should start singing higher songs because they will make you switch into a different range from your comfortable belted voice in order for you to sing them.I would give you some examples for songs so you dont instantly start singing Queen or Iron Maiden or Judas Priest, you would probably blow your voice out.I have a four octave vocal range and even i have problems with their songs.Can you tell me your prefered genre so I can give you songs that you would actually like to sing?Also Id recommend practicing with youtube cause theres probably lessons for everything on there and it wont hurt your chances to tipe in how to increase my vocal intensity, range, vibrato and so on.I know of this one technique in which you can make your voice hit high notes easily if you practice singing a song an octave under its range and then after a while try it in its real range, if you can go that low.Id recommend 3 days to a week of practice for this technique, 20 mins a day.Helped me out a lot.
Last edited by MrBillion at Jul 21, 2011,
#7
I like just about everything. I enjoy progressive, ambient, music. I'll try out that last technique soon, the song clip I posted was originally 5? frets up I believe.
#9
Just one more thing, can you tell me whats your current vocal range?If you dont know note for note then tell me in standard tuning on guitar which is the lowest and highest note you can comfortably sing without, and then with a falsetto.If its not a problem.
#10
Yeah five frets up above.
My current range i'm not completely sure about, but I think i switch over into falsetto on the E right after middle C.
#13
Is your voice really deep? can you sing the note C in three different octaves below middle C?
#14
I'd say it's moderately deep, and I don't believe I can do 3 no. Once I get two C's down from Middle C, my voice gets very useless sounding. Let's see, there are some Doors songs that are too deep for me.
#15
So you can sing middle c, and two Cs below it?
Cause that would be pretty badass
#17
So lets assume you have a two octave modal vocal range from E2 to E4 which is middle E.
Here are some helpful songs, a variety of genres from pop rock to heavy metal, in your range and a bit above to get you started.First of, everything by re hot chili peppers is in your vocal range so that can help you get more certain with your range.Secondly Gimme all your lovin and Sharp dressed man by ZZ top, just half a note over E4, maybe one full, meaning up to F#4.Good for building intensity, also fun to play on guitar at the same time.If youre more into commercial pop rock i would suggest you found me by the fray and Angels by Robbie Williams.Angels is a bit higher, i think to a G4 so leave that for later or try the technique i told you about.If you like long songs then try tender by Blur.You really got me and all day and all of the night by the kinks, i think just a bit over your range.Unforgiven 2 by metallica but in normal tuning.The wizard by black sabbath.

Oh yeah, neglected to mention the best technique for increasing...pretty much everything, vocal range, intensity, endurance.Red hot chili peppers can increase your consistency and endurance because even though their songs dont have a big range, theres pretty much no pause in singing unlike most other bands where the singer gets 3 minute pauses in each of his 8 minute songs.

But the tecnique itself.You have to increase your lung capacity.You have to start practicing holding your breath, maybe diving and definently try playing an instrument like the trombone, saxophone, clarinet...I have been playing the flute since age eight, and it has really improved my vocal range, by about an octave i think, plus i learned great vibrato from it and i can now hold my breath for three and a half minutes.So try it if you didnt already.

Having the ability to hold more air in you will give you the ability to sing louder because you will be able to put more air in each note, increasing intensity tenfold.And you will also be able to hold a note for forty seconds like those virtuoso opera singers...or Bruce Dickinson, Rob Halford and so on.So that works for endurance.
Last edited by MrBillion at Jul 21, 2011,
#19
Thank you so very much, MrBillion. Very nice list, too. Definitely going to start singing some Chili Peppers.
#20
Great that you're taking lessons. What is your teacher teaching you?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
Quote by axemanchris
Great that you're taking lessons. What is your teacher teaching you?

CT


Well let's see. He has me doing a ton breathing exercises(which I understand why), scales, talked a little on resonance, a little here and there. I think He just wanted to touch base with a lot of topics, before he goes into detail on any of them.

Bad thing is, I'm moving soon so I might need to find a new one.
#22
But is he teaching you HOW to produce your voice? Because, really... that's what learning how to sing should be about!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#24
Is he succeeding? What are you doing differently now that you weren't doing three months ago? How has your approach to singing changed?

See, scales are one thing, and they are useful, but they don't help you to learn to produce your voice differently than you did before.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#25
Well, I do feel like a have a slightly better understanding of how everything should be working together. I suppose I still am not grasping it though.
#26
Oh yeah, another thing.Another way to make your voice more sure and less trembling is to start singing in front of other people, so take some of the simpler of the songs i told you, take your acoustic (if you have one), and start singing in front of other people because sometimes not being able to get your full voice can be a psychological problem, and not a problem of ability.
I hope this also makes sense.
#27
By the sounds of things, getting another teacher might not be a bad thing. After three months, you're not sure what you are doing differently? That suggests to me that he's not being terribly clear about HOW to sing.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#28
Quote by axemanchris
By the sounds of things, getting another teacher might not be a bad thing. After three months, you're not sure what you are doing differently? That suggests to me that he's not being terribly clear about HOW to sing.

CT


This is a good point, but at the same time, I have seen improvement. So I'm really not sure what to do here. I'm gonna give him a little more time, but once I move I may just find a new one in that area.

Also, could I ask for a critique from you, axemanchris? What do you hear wrong in the clip?
#29
You're a damn sight better than me when I started out.

That said...

I hear a couple of things to improve:
-your voice is in your throat. You will not achieve resonance or projection until you learn how to place it forward on your hard palate.
-you lack breath support, which is partly *because* your voice is in your throat. As a result your pitch goes flat. Additionally, breath support also helps with projection and resonance.

In your lessons, you need to learn:
-how to get your voice out of your throat
-how to relax your throat
-how to support your voice
-where to place your voice

You will *practice* these things by doing scale exercises, but you will NOT LEARN THEM from doing scale exercises. You will learn them from having your teacher tell you how, show you, and work with you towards learning to do these things.

Your pitch will improve along with your technique, because the root of your pitch problems comes from a lack of knowledge of how to produce the voice. Your pitch will improve with practicing technique - not merely from practicing what you have always been doing.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#30
Quote by axemanchris
You're a damn sight better than me when I started out.

That said...

I hear a couple of things to improve:
-your voice is in your throat. You will not achieve resonance or projection until you learn how to place it forward on your hard palate.
-you lack breath support, which is partly *because* your voice is in your throat. As a result your pitch goes flat. Additionally, breath support also helps with projection and resonance.

In your lessons, you need to learn:
-how to get your voice out of your throat
-how to relax your throat
-how to support your voice
-where to place your voice

You will *practice* these things by doing scale exercises, but you will NOT LEARN THEM from doing scale exercises. You will learn them from having your teacher tell you how, show you, and work with you towards learning to do these things.

Your pitch will improve along with your technique, because the root of your pitch problems comes from a lack of knowledge of how to produce the voice. Your pitch will improve with practicing technique - not merely from practicing what you have always been doing.

CT


Thank you very much for that; it's very helpful. I have been looking into Appoggio, do you think that would help with breathing? Also,--and yes I understand this is just the internet, and I will still bring it up to my instructor--how can I achieve placing my voice in the hard palate? Are there any special exercises or techniques?
#31
Quote by ColinJackson93
Thank you very much for that; it's very helpful.


Good. I'm glad.

Quote by ColinJackson93

I have been looking into Appoggio, do you think that would help with breathing?


Well... sort of. Appoggio is the maintenance of breath once it is inside you. If you're not breathing correctly, appoggio will be pretty much impossible. I often compare it to learning how to ride a bike with no hands. First you have to learn how to ride with two hands, then with one, and then with no hands. You can't skip steps, as each part of the process depends entirely on success in the step before.

Quote by ColinJackson93

Also,--and yes I understand this is just the internet, and I will still bring it up to my instructor--how can I achieve placing my voice in the hard palate? Are there any special exercises or techniques?


Check the site in my sig.

The four steps - like learning to ride with no hands - MUST be learned in order, and must be mastered before moving onto the next.

1. The lift of the throat helps to remove the biggest barrier all singers start with - their own throats.
2. The mask of the face is all about placement, which helps with projection, resonance, and focus of pitch and tone.
3. The inhalation of the voice focuses on strength and resonance.
4. The hold of the breath is the appoggio you are talking about.

Be sure to check out the MySeriesTV videos under the "resources" section. They're not exciting, but they are very informative. The man in those videos was a tenor with the Metropolitan Opera, and when he joined, he was the youngest tenor to have ever joined - a truly gifted singer.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#32
Once again, thank you so very much. Very helpful once more. I will check out those links right now.