#1
Hi
Been playing guitar for about 2 years now and in the past 9 months I have started learning songs to the actual track or metronome, but I cannot get the blasted thing in time.

When playing with a metronome I cannot see how the beat fits in with my playing; I can hit every note with the click, or do two per click but music isn't all uniform like this. When playing in parallel with the recording it's easier because the instrument im replicating can be heard but its still grossly out of time.

I taught myself to find the beat of a song and tap my foot to it but that's as far as ive got and can't actually fit my playing with it.

Anyone got any tips or ideas to get myself in time or just keep trying- its getting frustrating and i'm afraid of loosing interest because of this.
#2
So dont, just play with the recording, lots of people have issues with keeping the beat, music often has tempo changes so its best to forget about tempo and just try to make the thing you play resemble the original as much as humanly possible, another good way is playing in a band because you can get constructive criticism from someone who actually hears you perform.
#3
Are you counting it in your head, too? Break it down to the smallest rhythmic element in the phrase and count it out like that. For example, a phrase that doesn't go faster than eighth notes, count out all the eighth notes along with the metronome/song.

1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and

The numbers are the beat, the ands are the eighth note between the beats. So you could have something like:

1 (and) (2) and (3) and 4 and

where the () signify a silent beat.

Likewise if there are sixteenths involved:

1 e and a 2 e and a 3 e and a 4 e and a

or for triplet groups:

1 la li 2 la li 3 la li 4 la li

This is one of those things that is hard to explain in a soundless medium. Keep at it! Oh, and start slow, obviously.

EDIT:
Quote by MrBillion
So dont, just play with the recording, lots of people have issues with keeping the beat, music often has tempo changes so its best to forget about tempo and just try to make the thing you play resemble the original as much as humanly possible [...]


How will he play anything if a drummer starts laying down a beat and asks for some improv?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
Last edited by soviet_ska at Jul 21, 2011,
#4
Simple, he will do the thing hes suposed to do.He will practice, learn how to hold a beat without needing to concentrate the whole time on keeping it, and play it like a pro.
#5
Quote by MrBillion
Simple, he will do the thing hes suposed to do.He will practice, learn how to hold a beat without needing to concentrate the whole time on keeping it, and play it like a pro.


So, you're suggesting he DOES practice with a beat (like a metronome) until he internalizes it?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#6
Well yeah, I guess, but he shouldnt take it too seriously like playing with a metronome is the only way to play it, because his playing will, after a while completely depend on beat keeping, and you really dont come to a concert to see a guitarist staring at his tapping foot trying to keep the beat.Happened to me about three years ago so I guess I still have issues with using it.Point is, dont concentrate sorely on playing with a metronome, try to learn how to just play without thinking about the metronome pounding in your head the whole time.Thats all.
#7
Well the point is that you internalize the beat until it becomes an unconcious thing. Foot tapping is a great habit to get into, though: it never outlives its use.

The issue I had with your original post is that he shouldn't just play along with a recording. It's simply parroting what he hears at that point, which isn't teaching him a thing about beat keeping. Playing with a metronome will help him conceptualize ideas to a point where he can alter its tempo without having to hear it or play out of time for a while. The point is he needs to be synthesizing the timing of the beat as he goes--which can be done with metronomes, drum beats and backing tracks--and not just mimicking exactly what he hears (which he admits he is doing poorly at, hence his post.)
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
Last edited by soviet_ska at Jul 21, 2011,
#8
^ playing with a metronome isn't the only way to play by any means, but extended practice with one will definitely produce much better results for him in the long run. ideally i would just say slow down the click track until you can play everything cleanly and in time and if that means playing at 70 bpm to hit every note then thats what he should do.
#9
And if youre already practicing with a metronome, then dont practice whole songs, just the parts that you have issues with, and when youre sure of those, then play the whole song.And then up the tempo.
#10
Yeah I figured that prating to the track won't help because once the track im playing is removed id be totally lost.

Heres an example, I learnt the intro to "The return of captain EO" by Buckethead and I want to play it to a metronome, each note is obviously not the same length so im stumped how to "fit" the rff into the metronome's clicks.

But yeah, great stuff so far ill keep at it REAL slow and see...
#11
I have this problem as well. I can find the beat in songs, but then when i try to play them to that beat, its just no good. i have been practicing with a metronome lately, but not to a song. I just bearly picked up the instrument about a week ago after a while of not playing and feel like im right back where i was, discouraged because of timing and rythme. Ive been just strumming simple chord progessions to the metronome, and ive been doing this quite diligently but im not sure how much its helping. Maybe it just takes time, but any suggestions would be great. Also, Ive been practicing the song Only A Hobo by Bob Dylan, if anyone could suggest where i should set my metronome to that would be great.
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