#1
I finally got an okay acosutic guitar and i recently started a fingerpicking course. Now when i play scales or improvise and stuff, i usually anchor my pinky (depending on how intricate what i'm playing is) but obviously i can't anchor when i'm fingerpicking because of the whole PIMA thing and how the pinky actually has a job to do. sO I'M PRETTY sure that's why my arm gets tired really fast.

Is it just something i get used to, or is my technique just bad?
G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
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#2
I would suggest not to anchor for fingerpicking even if you pinky is not plucking the strings because this will limit you right hand into a more fixed position as opposed to a freer position which is a better technique for right hand string selection. playing fingerstyle and playing with a pick (which is what I've presumed you've been doing until now) are two totally different techniques so, for now, it may seem odd to not incorporate your habits when using a pick with fingerstyle.
your arm will strengthen over time - which part of your arm gets sore?
#3
Go to " Guitar technique forum" There is a sticky titled " Read this guitar technique" It has a lot of very good info. Cheers
#4
Your hand position might be the problem (don't anchor by the way) or it might be you're using too much force to play or you could be trying to play too fast.

It's not very clear what you're doing wrong but you shouldn't feel any sort of tension in your arm at all when playing.
#5
Check out a guitarist names Gareth Pearson, he plays fingerstyle while anchoring his pinky. Tommy Emmanuel does it sometimes as well. Ewan Dobson for example just rests his palm against the guitar while playing. It's all about how you are born (some people have really weird hitchhikers thumbs and have to adjust their technique because of that), find a way that you think is good for you and then get good while playing that way!
#6
Quote by Azhark
Check out a guitarist names Gareth Pearson, he plays fingerstyle while anchoring his pinky. Tommy Emmanuel does it sometimes as well. Ewan Dobson for example just rests his palm against the guitar while playing. It's all about how you are born (some people have really weird hitchhikers thumbs and have to adjust their technique because of that), find a way that you think is good for you and then get good while playing that way!



No modified technique will ever call for you to anchor with your pinky. It's totally possible to play without all that anchoring business comfortably, you just need to practice intelligently.Resting your palm against the guitar hinders tone production.


There are some things that will need some players to adjust your technique but the hitch hiker's thumb isn't something that you'll need to worry about. I've got a rather extreme one but I learnt to play without all the weird crap that comes with the thumb.
#7
No modified technique will ever call for you to anchor with your pinky. It's totally possible to play without all that anchoring business comfortably, you just need to practice intelligently.Resting your palm against the guitar hinders tone production.


I'd say that you should go for what you feel are right. It might be because I've heard all these "horror" stories about people that are thaught that the way they are playing are wrong and there only is this one specific way of plaing that is the "right" way. They doesn't improve anything almost, it's first later when they are changing back to their old technique everything is working great again.

Check this out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNKs6fU7X6g He's an amazing guitarist. Look at his right hand technique. Also, Jerry Reed (CGP) only used the thumb, middle and ring finger while playing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni8KBhnebwE I believe the one who "created" the ground to what we call fingerstyle guitar today, Merle Travis, also only used those 3 fingers. The fingerstyle guitar doesn't really have any roots in perfect picking technique like the classical guitar has. But if you play classical I'd suggest you to learn the "proper" classical technique Since the classical guitar is built for it with it's flat neck and strings that are made for the technique.
#8
The discussions about anchoring or not go on and on....
Many prominent fingerstyle players do, and many don't. I'm checking out the online lessons from Fred Sokolow currently, and he does it.
Hard to argue with results.
If your current practice is causing you discomfort, try changing. It's not a big deal unless you're trying to follow strict classical technique.
If you're just a "fingerpicker" like me, no problem; do what's comfortable.
#9
Quote by Azhark
I'd say that you should go for what you feel are right. It might be because I've heard all these "horror" stories about people that are thaught that the way they are playing are wrong and there only is this one specific way of plaing that is the "right" way. They doesn't improve anything almost, it's first later when they are changing back to their old technique everything is working great again.

Check this out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNKs6fU7X6g He's an amazing guitarist. Look at his right hand technique. Also, Jerry Reed (CGP) only used the thumb, middle and ring finger while playing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni8KBhnebwE I believe the one who "created" the ground to what we call fingerstyle guitar today, Merle Travis, also only used those 3 fingers. The fingerstyle guitar doesn't really have any roots in perfect picking technique like the classical guitar has. But if you play classical I'd suggest you to learn the "proper" classical technique Since the classical guitar is built for it with it's flat neck and strings that are made for the technique.



I'm just letting TS know that they don't have to anchor with their pinky if they don't want to. I know of heaps of guitarists who have odd right hand technique and still sound great, hell, it was considered 'right' to anchor with your pinky and not use your ring finger in the 19th century and some of the 19th century guitar music is incredibly virtuosic.

I'm not entirely sure what you mean by how a flat neck will make it more appropriate to use a classical technique .

There are advantages to anchoring but it dampens the sound board (yes, the difference is noticeable, more so in good instruments), restricts the movement of the right hand for even notes/articulation and getting a sound that projects just puts strain on your hands.

You can get away with anchoring and omitting the use of some fingers but the point of hand position is to cover as much string space as possible so you're not jumping around and shifting unnecessarily while maintaining a good sound.
#10
I'm not entirely sure what you mean by how a flat neck will make it more appropriate to use a classical technique .


Well, if you compare the classical fingerboard with the arch fingerboard (that's on electrics and acoustics) the arch ones are a little bit more round and are a little bit more focused on the fretboard hand. That's because the fretting hand conforms far easier to the curved surface and is also easier towards the index finger when you for example do bar chords.

The flat fingerboard of the classical guitar helps the guitarists plucking hand to for example easier track the strings since the strings are alingned at a much more uniform level for both accuracy and ease of playing. So if the classical guitars would have a curved fretboard then the plucking hand would have to reach a little more awkwardly for the classical technique.

You can for example notice it if you ever really have learned a piece on the classical guitar and then moved to play an acoustic that it is a really different layout for your plucking hand to feel how the string sets are going across the fingerboard.

So the classical guitar is from scratch designed for the plucking hand and the acoustic is more designed for the fretting hand.
#11
Quote by Azhark
Well, if you compare the classical fingerboard with the arch fingerboard (that's on electrics and acoustics) the arch ones are a little bit more round and are a little bit more focused on the fretboard hand. That's because the fretting hand conforms far easier to the curved surface and is also easier towards the index finger when you for example do bar chords.

The flat fingerboard of the classical guitar helps the guitarists plucking hand to for example easier track the strings since the strings are alingned at a much more uniform level for both accuracy and ease of playing. So if the classical guitars would have a curved fretboard then the plucking hand would have to reach a little more awkwardly for the classical technique.

You can for example notice it if you ever really have learned a piece on the classical guitar and then moved to play an acoustic that it is a really different layout for your plucking hand to feel how the string sets are going across the fingerboard.

So the classical guitar is from scratch designed for the plucking hand and the acoustic is more designed for the fretting hand.


You don't really have to change your right hand position when you play an acoustic. Sure, the string spacing is different but not so much that you'll have to do anything 'awkward'.


I do agree somewhat with the classical guitar being better for the plucking hand and the acoustic for the fretting hand but I wouldn't go so far to say either were 'designed' for that specifically.
#12
Gee thanks guys. I don't anchor, so i guess it's my technique. Meh.
G(g)od was like: "Make you an ark of gopher wood; rooms shall you make in the ark, and shall pitch it within and without with pitch."

And i was like: "What's gopher wood?"
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#13
speaking of ewan dobson resting his palm on the strings, it's because he mutes a lot when he plays, but he's a classically trained player so it's not like he's developed bad technique, it's just one style he uses