#1
but what excalty am i looking for when praticing scales?


also can someone tell how to construct a penatonic scale?


ty very much
#2
support your scene find a music teacher with some badass chops. don't ask complete strangers online. duuuh
#3
This is a standard Pentatonic in A minor.


e----5------8------------------------
B----5------8-----------------------
G----5---7--------------------------
D----5---7--------------------------
A----5---7---------------------------
E----5------8------------------------


As far as "constructing one", jsut find the root note on the E string, say in C#, so the 9th fret. THen you'd play this same shape, but starting on the 9th fret instead of the 5th

Scales are basically just notes that sound good together, and are not meant to be rigidly followed. They're a starting point, if you will. As a beginner though, it helps to follow the scales more so than not.
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Last edited by chadreed32 at Jul 21, 2011,
#4
When practicing scales, you should be listening to how the intervals sound in relation to each other so your ear can get better at recognizing them. Also, they act as exercise for the hands, think of it like running a mile when you practice scales for like 30 minutes.

As for the pentatonic scale, I'm not entirely sure what the formula is to build one, but just goggle it and you'll have your answer in seconds.
#5
i know what are scales and everything. but ive seen on these threads where they tell people to keep praticing scales, but i never understood how praticing scales for a long time will help you.
#6
Not sure exactly what you mean with the first question, but it depends on how you are practicing the scales. Some people practice scales to help with speed, dexterity, or learn new scales to break out of a rut. Not every scale fits right with a certain song or chord progression, either. A blues scale might sound great over a chord progression, but a minor scale might sound like crap over the same progression, depends on how you use it.

As for the pentatonic scale, it is simply this:

e---------------------------------------------1---4--------------
B------------------------------------1---4-----------------------
G---------------------------1---3--------------------------------
D-------------------1---3----------------------------------------
A-----------1---3-------------------------------------------------
E --1---4---------------------------------------------------------


Those numbers are not frets, they are your fingers, use that scale shape anywhere on the fret board. 1 = index finger, 2 = middle finger, 3 = ring finger, 4 = pinky

Here is a commonly used pentatonic scale (these ARE frets):

e-----------------------------------------------5---8-------------
B--------------------------------------5---8----------------------
G-----------------------------5---7------------------------------
D--------------------5---7----------------------------------------
A-----------5---7-------------------------------------------------
E--5---8----------------------------------------------------------


Hope this helped.
#8
Quote by harvestkingx
i never understood how praticing scales for a long time will help you.


It doesn't, honestly.

Once you have become comfortable with you guitar, and you know your scales to the point where you can find any note in the scale anywhere on the fret-board, you've got nothing left to do. Basically after that you can mix modes in there as well, and so on.
Where's Waldo?
#9
Quote by harvestkingx
do penatonics have diatonic traids?


As the pentatonic scale really actually functions as the major scale with accidentals (in a major key), or as the minor scale (in a minor key), you're better off referring to those scales in order to get diatonic triads. If you simply derived them from the pentatonic scale you'd just be left with meaningless chords...even the 1 3 5 derived from the tonic of the minor pentatonic scale would create a chord that the pentatonic scale does not resolve to. Not handy.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by AlanHB
As the pentatonic scale really actually functions as the major scale with accidentals (in a major key), or as the minor scale (in a minor key), you're better off referring to those scales in order to get diatonic triads. If you simply derived them from the pentatonic scale you'd just be left with meaningless chords...even the 1 3 5 derived from the tonic of the minor pentatonic scale would create a chord that the pentatonic scale does not resolve to. Not handy.


So basically you are saying it is unwise to construct a diatonic triad based solely on a pentatonic scale, and would be better off using the major/minor scales to construct the triads, mostly for scale resolution so a lick played over a triad doesn't sound like crap? I just want to make sure I am understanding you correctly for my own benefit, I'm pretty sloppy when it comes to theory.
#11
Quote by AlanHB
As the pentatonic scale really actually functions as the major scale with accidentals in a major key


you're going to have to explain that to me.
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#12
the first question is actually an extremely smart question--one that most people don't really think about, especially when there just starting out.
my list is
timing (making sure your rhythms are accurate)
dynamics (try going loud to soft, soft to loud)
fluidity and lack of tension (play the scale slow enough so its both easy and perfect)
knowledge of all the notes
not relying on box patterns (i worked on one and two string scales, some people think doing thats stupid, so at least practice starting the scale on any note on the e string that falls in the scale)
practicing in, at the very least 3rds (1-3, 2-4 etc), triads (1-3-5, 2-4-6 etc) and octaves (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9 etc)--if you want to get more advanced practice it by every diatonic interval, stepwise and leapwise and using melodic cells (little patterns of notes, like 1-2-3-5, 1-3-4-5 etc)
tone quality (each note should be as pleasing to the ear as humanly possible--pick attack should give the note a ringing quality, but not be overly hard, the fretting hand should not stifle the note, or cause any intonation problems, vibrato should be regular and pleasing to the ears--a bit subjective-- and should not make the note sound noticably out of tune)

by the way, the major pentatonic scale is 1-2-3-5-6.
so in C you get
C D E G A
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Jul 21, 2011,
#13
Scales and arpeggios are how you practice almost everything. Play scales straight, then in a different picking style, then legato, staccato, etc.

Then practice them in different rhythms, straight, swing, 6/8, dotted patterns, and everything possible. Play ascending and descending in thirds, fourths, etc. But most of all once they are natural to play you can focus on how your fingers move while trying out new technics and streamlining what you already know.

If you practice them properly then you should have no problem playing (and hopefully reading) any sort of rhythm or melody possible with good articulation because nearly every finger motion will have been rehearsed. There are other exercises that fill in the gaps of weird finger patterns that scales miss.
#14
so i dont have to learn different varrations of one scale ?


for example find 99 different ways of a c major scale, is tht what i have to learn (not excalty 99 ) but is there a number i have to learn of one scale?
#15
You should also do it in all the different ways you can play the scale but some are so impractical that they aren't worth practicing.
#16
Quote by harvestkingx
so i dont have to learn different varrations of one scale ?


for example find 99 different ways of a c major scale, is tht what i have to learn (not excalty 99 ) but is there a number i have to learn of one scale?



You don't HAVE to do anything.You can know 1000 ways to play every scale but it won't help you as a player if you don't know how to use them.

I say start small. Pick a few scales(or stick to one) that you like and learn how to use those. I'm not a theory snob so take my advice with a grain of salt.

Play what you like, practice some scales or whatever if you want. At the very least you should have a few in your trick bag just to mix things up when your practicing. (chromatic runs can get pretty boring)
#17
Quote by AeolianWolf
you're going to have to explain that to me.


I should have stated "minor" pentatonic.

Otherwise I'm sure you can follow the logic.

In the key of A, the scale that you play is A major, or A major with accidentals. Say then we proceed to play the A minor pentatonic over the key of A. Whilst the notes A, D and E are common to both the key of A and the A minor pentatonic scale, two notes are not.

The A minor pentatonic scale has a flattened 3rd - C, and a flattened 7th - G both of which are not in the key of A major. All out of key notes are referred to as accidentals.

As a result we are left with the A minor pentatonic scale functioning as the A major scale with accidentals when it is employed in the key of A.


Quote by neversleeps84
So basically you are saying it is unwise to construct a diatonic triad based solely on a pentatonic scale, and would be better off using the major/minor scales to construct the triads, mostly for scale resolution so a lick played over a triad doesn't sound like crap? I just want to make sure I am understanding you correctly for my own benefit, I'm pretty sloppy when it comes to theory.


Well not unwise, but it's just not a practical exercise. Can we play the A minor pentatonic over a progression in A major? Sure.

If we harmonise 1 - 3 - 5 of the tonic of the pentatonic scale do we get the chord it resolves to? Nope, it'll resolve to A major, but your resulting triad will be A - D - A, which could be a D5 power chord with A on the bass, or an A4 dyad? Somebody could explain what it is better, but the main point is that it's not A major

As for making sure a lick doesn't sound like crap, no amount of creating diatonic triads will help you with that one. Your best tool for that is your ears.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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