#1
Ive heard alot of people using this term, and I have been playing guitar for 5 years and still havent heard what this word means. Any help guys?

Thanks
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#3
Your "chops" are your muscless around the jaws and cheeks ("I'm just busting your chops," etc). It's absolutely crucial to have strong jaw and cheek muscles to develop a high level of technical skill as a trumpet or horn player, and in the forties, in bepop circles, trumpet and horn players used expressions like "he's got great chops" to describe a player with good technical command of the instrument, or an expression like "he hasn't the chops for it" to describe a player who was lacking technique.

The term "chops" then started to be used in reference to a musician's technical command of his instrument, first in jazz and then in other genres.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#4
Ah okay So if someone had good chops, they had good technique\alot of different skills under their belt?
Fender MIM 60th Anniversary Strat
Freshman Apollo Electro-acoustic
Line 6 POD HD500
Marshall MG15CD
#5
I think it's BS when it comes to guitar. It makes much more sense with a wind player, with the literal meaning of "chops."
#6
I now agree, after hearing where the term originated from it is rather stupid.At least now i can unerstand what people mean.
Fender MIM 60th Anniversary Strat
Freshman Apollo Electro-acoustic
Line 6 POD HD500
Marshall MG15CD
#7
Quote by CalumFraser
Ah okay So if someone had good chops, they had good technique\alot of different skills under their belt?


Not quite, you could have strong "chops" and still be a terrible trumpet or horn player, but you can't be a great trumpet or horn player without strong chops.

I don't like it as an expression regarding any instrument, but I think for guitarists, it's a terrible expression. Still, it'll be around forever, just like the "tone is in the fingers" mantra.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#8
Ithink I unerstand now! Thank you! And I agree on that expression too, although I do believe in it to a very short extent.
Fender MIM 60th Anniversary Strat
Freshman Apollo Electro-acoustic
Line 6 POD HD500
Marshall MG15CD
#9
Quote by Prophet of Page
Your "chops" are your muscless around the jaws and cheeks ("I'm just busting your chops," etc). It's absolutely crucial to have strong jaw and cheek muscles to develop a high level of technical skill as a trumpet or horn player, and in the forties, in bepop circles, trumpet and horn players used expressions like "he's got great chops" to describe a player with good technical command of the instrument, or an expression like "he hasn't the chops for it" to describe a player who was lacking technique.

The term "chops" then started to be used in reference to a musician's technical command of his instrument, first in jazz and then in other genres.


when i first started reading this i thought you were trollin hard, telling this guy that you needed strong facial muscles to play guitar well. olololol
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#10
Quote by CalumFraser
Ah okay So if someone had good chops, they had good technique\alot of different skills under their belt?



No, if they have it under their belt, they are very talented in bed

I thought the same thing about the face muscles jazz reply too at first (thought he was trolling), but that makes perfect sense. In the eighties, chops for guitar meant speed, or, more specifically, how you compared to Yngwie, lol; its meaning has evolved since then, however.
Last edited by afrika18 at Jul 22, 2011,