#1
i alway read article about getting faster in playing guitar. 99% that i've read said, use metronome. Then, i got a flash metronome from my friend. I put it in my laptop. When i used it, i become confuse about it. The beep sound. How to follow it. Please tell me in detail how to use metronome.
#3
Some people have rhythm, others don't. It can be learned generally speaking, but it seems that you naturally don't have that sort of rhythm. I had a friend who's been playing for far shorter than I have, but he can keep a beat better than me because it just comes naturally for him.

Anyways, to the point of your situation. Just tap your foot to it. It's the same thing as tapping your foot to music, just (as said) feel it. Bob your head, move your body, tap your foot, do anything to just feel the rhythm of a song. Once you got that down, turn on a metronome and try to do the same. It'll come naturally. Then start playing.

You can always just practice on simple beats (i.e. hit a progression of chords or notes to every beat of a metronome, or just an open E or something of that). I don't know, I'm not a professional, all my advice here could be wrong, I'm speaking from personal experience.

Anyway. Good luck.
#4
To tell you in detail how to use metronome:

1. Set the speed of the metronome. This is how fast or slow the beeps will occur in time, and generally represents the beat of the music, where the length of one beep until the next should conveniently represent one crotchet note, or a fourth note. Rhythms will usually correspond to the beat, such as the use of eighth or sixteenth notes, which are twice as fast, or four times as fast as the fourth note respectively. This means that you can play a rhythm to the tempo, or speed, of the metronome and usually this will improve your timing skills, which are useful when playing with other musicians as this will ensure everyone is playing the correct note at the most possible correct time. Individually, this is a form of repetition which trains your brain to memorize and better coordinate your muscles in order to be able to play a musical passage with better efficiency.

2. Feel the beat.
#6
Excuse my generality, a speed, or tempo, of 50, means that the metronome will beep 50 times every minute.
#7
Considering this still is the pit, use magnets to feel the beat better.
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#8
If i play a scale. Means every note i sounded must be same with beep sound. I meant must be synchronize. Is someting like that?
#9
that depends on how you wanna play it. You can play one or 2 or 3 or four (or more) notes for each beat(tick). This is tied to the music representation in notes.

If you have let'se say 4/4 rhytm, it meas you have 4 beats in 1 'bar' and each beat represents a fourth note. If you play scale in 4/4 rythm and written in fourth notes, you would play one note each tick. If it's in 8th notes, u'd play 2 notes each beat, meaning u play one note on tick and another note right in between two ticks. If it was written in 16th notes, you play 4 notes per beat (one on tick and 3 between the ticks, preferable equally spread), it could also be written in triplets (3 notes per beat, often used in blues) or half notes (1 note per 2 beats) (or are they called 2nds? ain't sure about the terminology here as english isn't my first language) etc, or it could also be different rythm (3/4 - 1 fourth note per beat, 3 beats per bar, etc). As I stated before, it's your practice and there isn't any set way how to practice your scales. You can start with 1 note per beat and when you handle that well you can try 2 or 4.
This is pretty much the very basics of music theory. Hope it was helpful at least a bit.

I had somewhere absolutely awesome video that explained this, but i can't find it )'=

edit: here! http://youtu.be/8Sw_trDFJw8
it's way better explanation of what i just written
Last edited by KorYi at Jul 22, 2011,
#10
if you're playing a scale or a regular pattern, play a fixed number of notes to each beat.
1 note per beat= quarter notes
2 notes = eighth notes
3 notes = eighth note triplets
4 notes = sixteenth notes
and so on

EDIT
If you're playing in 4/4 timing, 4 beats = 1 measure
in 3/4, 3 beats = 1 measure
and so on

EDIT 2:
Also practice playing odd note groupings(5, 7, 11, etc notes per beat) to improve your playing.
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Last edited by hames jetfield at Jul 22, 2011,
#11
At least now, i have a bit knowledge about metronome. I need to practice alot. Yeay
#13
Quote by hames jetfield
if you're playing a scale or a regular pattern, play a fixed number of notes to each beat.
1 note per beat= quarter notes
2 notes = eighth notes
3 notes = eighth note triplets
4 notes = sixteenth notes
and so on

EDIT
If you're playing in 4/4 timing, 4 beats = 1 measure
in 3/4, 3 beats = 1 measure
and so on

EDIT 2:
Also practice playing odd note groupings(5, 7, 11, etc notes per beat) to improve your playing.



Good explaination
#16
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I'm not a James Hetfield fan
My username is "hames jetfield" because "farty mriedman" sounds weird.

Quote by laid-to-waste
i have rabies from licking my pet rat's face


Jackson DK2M
Digitech RP255
Vox DA5
Casio CTK-6000