#1
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/53

so as the website is says and shows c-e-g being the chord and f being the passing note, how would i perform this on guitar, would i have an C major chord with an F and then i pick the f note without the chord, and then i go back to the c major chord without the f note? is that what an example of a passing note is?
#2
a passing note is a non-harmonic tone (not part of the harmony) that usually bridges two harmonic tones

for example over a C chord the melody might be

G F E

well F would be the passing tone because 4ths sound bad over major chords unless they are resolved quickly (4ths clash with the major 3rd). It serves as a step between G (the 5th) and E (the 3rd) but it is not part of the harmony
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#3
ok so passing tones are notes that are inbetween the thrids and the fifths of a chord? or is it more then that?

how would i use a passing tone do i play the c chord first thn hit the f note? or is the f note in the c chord?
#4
There is more to it than that.

http://smu.edu/totw/nct.htm

This link seems to have a good selection of information, though I did not read it thoroughly. At least check out the table.
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#5
so a passing note is somthing that sounds good but its not in a diatonic traid, so you would use a chord then a passing note then another chord?
#6
sorry its just on the website im showing it seems like the notes are going down a step (which it says what it done) but i cant get really read notes on music really good ( getting classical lessons in fall) so i cant tell what chord is next after c-e-g? is it A-C-E?


so ceg, fnote, ACE?
#7
Not sure where you're seeing the C. Looks like the examples given are in the key of D... .

I think you're confusing harmonic and melodic ideas. Passing notes are a melodic concept. A passing tone is just a non-chord tone that is preceded by a chord tone through stepwise motion and resolves to another chord tone stepping the same way.

I'm just not sure how to explain it much more concisely.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#8
ok i think im got it , but how come theres a passing note (the half note) on top of the chord for example.
#9
lol i finaly get pretty much what a passing note is a note that isnt in the scale but it pops out of the song (not littleraly) and makes it unique, playing a passing note should only be 1/8th of note or it sounds bad, so if with a passing note all your doing is just playing a note (or a chord) then using passing note to get to another note?

am i right?
#11
Passing tones connect two chord tones together. This could be notes of the same chord or different chords.

Of course you're not restricted to just one passing tone, you can use two, or more. And these don't have to be diatonic either.
#12
Quote by griffRG7321
Passing tones connect two chord tones together. This could be notes of the same chord or different chords.

Of course you're not restricted to just one passing tone, you can use two, or more. And these don't have to be diatonic either.



so wait all it is is just playing a chord then moving on to a note that dosent have the notes within the chord?

im just dont understand why the show the note above the chord in that example? it seems like im supose to play that note within the chord :p
#13
Then again, you're having trouble in telling harmony and melody apart. The chord and the melodic line exist "independently". The passing tone doesn't change the chord being played. For instance, in the first example, the chord being played is C major, all along (even though the voicing changes from bar 1 to bar 2). The melody goes G-F-E. G and E are chord tones (contained in the chord over which they're played, in this case, C major). Because the F is "between" them, both in time and pitch, it acts as a passing tone.

Edit: Sorry, I misunderstood your post. Seems like you did get it. Passing tones are very intuitive, anyway.
Last edited by sickman411 at Jul 23, 2011,
#14
ok thank you for being patient with me guys i really appericate the effort to help me lol, but final question, what does the 2nd chord have to be in order for it to be passing tone?
#15
It doesn't have to be anything. In the example from musictheory, both chords are C major. They can be two different chords, though. The chords just have to let the melody go: chord tone - non-chord tone - chord tone, by step.
#16
and the by step is another passing note that is going down a step so the by step would be f# or E depening if your going up a step or down a step?


edit: e wouldnt work cause its a note within a chord tone , my bad lol

Edit: wait f# would work either cause its not a step, its a half step, so by step you mean?
Last edited by harvestkingx at Jul 23, 2011,
#17
I mean by step as defined by that very lesson on musictheory, 2 lines above the example: in an interval of a second. Upwards or downwards. G moves to F by step, and so does F to E, even though F to E is a half-step.

F# could work, but you have to take into account that the example in the lesson is in C major (presumably) and F# doesn't belong in C major, so it would have more of a unique sound which would only sound good in some particular contexts (i.e. it would be much harder to make an F# sound good in there than an F natural).
Last edited by sickman411 at Jul 23, 2011,
#18
so what if i play ceg, then a d note, then to another chord thats in harmony with Ceg, and i go to F

would that be a passing?


what note would i play inbetween the chords in order for it to be a escaping note?


and a neigbouring note is just the same as a passing note but, is you just go back to the excat same chord.
#19
Quote by harvestkingx
so what if i play ceg, then a d note, then to another chord thats in harmony with Ceg, and i go to F

would that be a passing?


Yeah, going C - D - E with a C harmony would give you a passing note on D.

Quote by harvestkingx

what note would i play inbetween the chords in order for it to be a escaping note?


From C to F? Try C - D - A where the A arrives with the change in harmony to the F. (D would be the escape tone in this case.)
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#20
http://www.music-scores.com/graphics/ba971c.gif

In bar 2, the 2nd, 4th and 6th quavers are passing tones. The 7th quaver is an accented passing tone.

If you understand passing tones now you can check out other forms of dissonance such as auxiliary notes ( bar 8, beat 2, both parts), Suspensions (first bar, technically a retardation) etc etc...
#21
so C D A and D would be the escaping note? how come? wouldnt that be A? infact arent they both non harmoinic tones for C-e-g. Or is D the step and a is the skip?
#22
Quote by harvestkingx
so C D A and D would be the escaping note? how come? wouldnt that be A? infact arent they both non harmoinic tones for C-e-g. Or is D the step and a is the skip?


D is the escape note, and A is the resolution: it resolves by skip into the F chord.

You seem to be having a lot of trouble with something that isn't particularly difficult. You may be stepping too far outside the bounds of your knowledge, i.e. you don't have a solid enough grasp on more fundamental concepts. Either that, or you could use a teacher, who could explain things in a richer media.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#23
Quote by soviet_ska
D is the escape note, and A is the resolution: it resolves by skip into the F chord.

You seem to be having a lot of trouble with something that isn't particularly difficult. You may be stepping too far outside the bounds of your knowledge, i.e. you don't have a solid enough grasp on more fundamental concepts. Either that, or you could use a teacher, who could explain things in a richer media.



i know its kinda werid, i read all those lessons from the begining all the way to this point and boom i just dont get this one part, i try reading it and stuff but it dosent make sense, i think its because this is the first part of the lesson that actually requires some reading of music knownledge. i know how to construct a chord, scales, diatonic triads, 7th chords and even neoplation chords and all that stuff below, but this part is just blocking my brian or somthing. im getting classical lessons in the fall, so i think ill ask him more about it. i mean ive only been playing guitar for 8 months ive learned more then most then what most guitarist i know localy and they been playing for 5-6 years :/


i think now that ill just pratice finger picking, pinch harmonics and more voicings chords, and learn other scales for the time being, music theory has taught me alot, it improved me alot so im not giving up on it. Maybe it will click one during the summer lol. but ty soviet for trying you did all you could lol TY