#1
so there is the question. What should I do? Practice technique itself, or through songs (for example should I practice legato with excercises from book, or through some shreding songs?) what will make my improvement better?
#3
I myself seem to get better from playing real songs. I find myself learning new chords and then from there adding those chords to a song I make up on the fly. But in all honesty I think both would be a good thing to practice IMO.
#4
I like practicing songs better, but then again, it is up to you and how you have defined your goals.

I play guitar with a performance motivation in mind. My playing is geared around being on a stage playing songs. My reward is defined by that end.

You might be different, and that's ok. There are some freaky good guitarists out there that if it weren't for an occasional youtube vid would be absolutely unknown. Their approach is very personal, and not validated by others.
#5
Quote by Charley2715
I personally get more result from practicing technique through real songs


This. If I'm struggling with a certain part, I'll spend some time working on technique alone. You can benefit a lot more by learning whole songs as opposed to practising one lick/exercise, though
#6
Do both. But practising in a song situation is always better than playing mindless shreddy licks. Also, join a band.
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#7
Practice technique through songs. Play songs that are just beyond what you can do and if you find yourself having real trouble then isolate the section that gives you the problem and make it into a shorter exercise.

Doing it that way makes sure that you have something that's actual music when you're done with your exercise.
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#8
I often do method that you sugest Zaphod_Beebleb, breaking a song into smaller pieces, and practice rifs that make me trouble and it makes good results.
#9
Don't forget if your learning technique through songs, make sure you know what's happening in the song. Theoretically and on the fretboard. Don't just learn songs for the sake of learning it, try and learn something that is applicable in the future.
#10
Quote by sammo_boi
Do both. But practising in a song situation is always better than playing mindless shreddy licks. Also, join a band.


That sums it up for me. Why do you need to choose one or the other?
#11
Songs are just a collection of things that require a technique to perform. A lot of people come on here saying "I need an exercise for X technique so I can play Y song". At that point, I wonder why those people don't just practice X technique with Y song. That way you get both practice in the technique and an opportunity to see how it's used in a musical context.
#12
Quote by Radtastic89
I myself seem to get better from playing real songs. I find myself learning new chords and then from there adding those chords to a song I make up on the fly. But in all honesty I think both would be a good thing to practice IMO.

This is what I do.
#13
You will practice your technique through songs but you need to know what good technique is first
#14
Although ideally you should practice both, if I had to pick which is better I would go with songs. Although songs will usually throw you harder uses of a technique than if you started playing exercises designed to strengthen the same technique, if you slow down of the sections that use the technique and perfect the technique as performed in the song you will still get a fairly strong grasp of the technique while also learning how it is used in a musical context. Plus, assuming the song isn't just one technique over and over again you get valuable practice with other techniques the song uses as well as a piece of music that you can play with a band.
#15
I into shreding, so there are lot of techniques out there, but if I look at Metallica songs, or even megadeth there aren't so much of sweep picking excspt in Leper Messiah, Hangar 18, so I have to do some sweep arpegios on my own
#16
Quote by kimi_page
I into shreding, so there are lot of techniques out there, but if I look at Metallica songs, or even megadeth there aren't so much of sweep picking excspt in Leper Messiah, Hangar 18, so I have to do some sweep arpegios on my own


...

1 - If you can't find sweeping in Megadeth you're not looking very hard at all.

2 - Why would you only look at those two bands for shred? Really?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#17
Always learn by using the stuff you're learning in a context. No use knowing a complex lick if you don't know how to apply it or use it in context or different scenarios.
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