#1
Hey all, just a general question about how to improve my recording sound.

The gear I use is a Peavey 6505+ Combo miced with an SM57, into Cubase. I use EZ Drummer Drumkit From Hell for drums, and either record my own bass or use a VST.

Basically, I am finding it difficult to get a 'full' sound.

For an example, here is one of my recordings:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2hf1XoOMEU

To me it sounds too much like the audio tracks being piled on top of each other, and they arn't fitting in around each other, if that makes any sense.

Here is an example of where I managed to get a better sounding rhythm tone, but I have no idea how. The only think I can think of that differs between this and the first is that the first has VST strings and brass etc playing at the same time as the guitar:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_h82Pz-TbZU


Normally I cut the guitars off at the low end, and have two rhythm tracks panned about 50% left and 50% right, and have a lead track for solos etc panned central. The drums and synths I leave central.

Any help anyone can give? I can't help but feel I should be able to get something much better sounding given the equipment I am using.

Thanks.
Last edited by Random3 at Jul 22, 2011,
#2
Try panning the rhythm guitars even harder left and right. More mids perhaps? Different mic placements?
#3
A lot of the time I do have them both panned 100% left and right but I've experimented with both and havn't noticed a massive difference.

I have also tried stuff with mids but they seem to change a lot without me changing them. For example, the lead guitar in the first video sounds very middy when it uses the exact same settings as the rhythm.

For mic placement I tend to have it flat to the grill about an inch or less away, facing near the edge of the cone of the speaker. I have tried others, if this is completely wrong let me know
#4
Idk what you did to the first one, sounded cluttered, and just overrun with low frequencies.

The easiest way to do it is to have the least processed signal you can get. Make sure your mics line level is around -6 decibels, high pass around 25 hz, low pass around 10,000 hz, boost the high mids a tad, double track, pan both 100%. Run the bass guitar up center(bass is what glues everything together, giving you that huge tone), drums up center, solo up center(with the same type of EQing as the rhythm guitars).

Don't pan 50-50, it wont get you the tone you're after, which in metal, rhythm guitars are panned 100%.

Back your mic off about an inch.
#5
I'll give that a go tomorrow, thanks.

Also, probably a dumb question, but say you have a song with rhythm etc then a solo comes in, should you automate the volumes of everything else so that they are quieter? Only reason I ask is that a lot of the time I find I have volume peaks when additional instruments are playing, even if only for a couple of seconds.
#6
Quote by Random3
I'll give that a go tomorrow, thanks.

Also, probably a dumb question, but say you have a song with rhythm etc then a solo comes in, should you automate the volumes of everything else so that they are quieter? Only reason I ask is that a lot of the time I find I have volume peaks when additional instruments are playing, even if only for a couple of seconds.


No, that tends to screw with the mix, you want the lead to cut through the mix, not be in front of the mix. Usually you have to make the lead have more mids and highs, using a compressor on the leads tend to help though.
#9
Quote by Random3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LW7yZ9B-cW8

Covered this yesterday, and tried out all of the things you suggested. Any feedback?


Tell me how you're recording, are you using a mic? What kind of mic. Any interface? Line in? Impulses? Those kinda things.

It sounds better, that's for sure.
#10
Quote by ethan_hanus
Tell me how you're recording, are you using a mic? What kind of mic. Any interface? Line in? Impulses? Those kinda things.

It sounds better, that's for sure.


I have an SM57 micing my amp, a 6505+ combo. Using Cubase as an interface, not a line in or any impulses. I have tried recording using the line in technique and it worked but didn't sound as good IMO.
#13
Simply get everything tighter. If you're not happy with the way you sound on tape the most likely place you'll find the problem?

You.

I've had that problem before, too. The cluttered train wreck sound?

I wasn't playing tight enough. I did retake after retake until I had the guitars where I wanted them. Then I rewrote the drums.

It's a cyclic, back and forth process until it all starts fitting together for you.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#15
Sounds damn good to me!

Could use a little more high end. You might boost those on the amp, which might sound a bit odd to your ears, but might help out on the recording end.

My guitar sounds really weird through the amp, but recorded I think it sounds pretty badass.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."