#1
I know everybody's a guitar guy here...Hopefully there are a couple of you who can help with this.

I'm a drummer, and I'm teaching someone drums. I'm starting with a few simple key things for him to work on: snare drum technique, rudiments, rock/blues beats/fills, reading sheet music, and understanding rhythm and common rhythm-keeping technique of drummers.

Now we're mostly focussing on technique first...How to hold the sticks (match grip for now), and simply hit the drum in time using acents, regular notes, and ghost notes. Those are the most important, most basic things for a drummer to learn first, basically the mechanics of hitting things, how to hold the sticks and the motions of your hits.

Problem: I learned this a very long time ago. Its second nature to me. My drum teacher loves my technique (unless I'm learning something I've never tried before, everyone's had that day where you're too confused to worry about technique lol), because its been forced into my brain and my muscle memory for years by my teacher and my brother before him. So I have no idea how to dissect what I'm doing and teach it to somebody...I'm always asking him to step off the drumset so I can drum and try to understand how to put what I'm doing into words. It gets very annoying.

I was pretty young when my brother started teaching me (well, middle school, so only a few years ago, but I repress those memories lol), I don't remember how he taught me, and its too natural to put into words. This is a pretty bad problem, I've gained a decent reputation teaching guitar and bass, I don't want that to be ruined because I was thinking of stating to take in students other than my friends and charging for lessons, I know I'm ready.

So I was wondering if anybody had some ideas of what I could tell him about technique?

Thanks for any/all help.

edit: oh and I have another question. Do you think I should start him on bigger sticks? I stated out using 5As, my drum teacher eventually gave me big sticks for drumline snare (and invited me to a sick drumline I didn't have time for unfortunately). Around that time I stated using 7As I now use both 5As and 7As for different styles. Because of this drumstick history I assumed starting on small sticks is fine, I've3 had him using 5As so far, but I hear its easier to learn technique on big sticks.
Last edited by TMVATDI at Jul 23, 2011,
#2
If you haven't done so, a lesson plan would help. Create goals with your students. Write them down. Before you meet with a student chenille lesson plan and "practice" teaching it before you meet with them. If you've actually got that stuff fresh in your hands and mind then it'll be easier to describe

Edit: 5A's are fine for learning. Once the student has a SOLID grasp of the basics and has advanced from novice to mediocre/average then you can talk about different stick sizes. Beginners don't even know how to play yet let alone know the differences in stick sizes/woods, batter heads, etc
Last edited by vjferrara at Jul 23, 2011,
#3
Quote by vjferrara
If you haven't done so, a lesson plan would help. Create goals with your students. Write them down. Before you meet with a student chenille lesson plan and "practice" teaching it before you meet with them. If you've actually got that stuff fresh in your hands and mind then it'll be easier to describe

Edit: 5A's are fine for learning. Once the student has a SOLID grasp of the basics and has advanced from novice to mediocre/average then you can talk about different stick sizes. Beginners don't even know how to play yet let alone know the differences in stick sizes/woods, batter heads, etc

My drum teacher usually starts people out on 2As, he let me go back to 5A on my second lesson when he realized I had already learned halfway decent technique by then. That's why I was wondering :p

I have sort of a lesson plan, I guess I have a better one for guitar/bass/piano teaching, I teach them first about general harmony, then collaborate with them to create a basic chord progression, then introduce new ways to play with it, solo over it alter it, etc. On drums I planned to teach the way I was taught because I don't have any complaints about my drum education, problem is my first few lessons were so long ago I don't remember how they went
#5
Quote by Myshadow46_2
UG has a drum forum. Perhaps posting there would help?

IT FINALLY GOT ONE!?
#6
Quote by TMVATDI
So I have no idea how to dissect what I'm doing and teach it to somebody...I'm always asking him to step off the drumset so I can drum and try to understand how to put what I'm doing into words. It gets very annoying.


is it plausible to have two kits there, so you don't need to trade off with the student?
#7
I'm a drummer too! Let me see how I can help you.

I would firstly not recommend ghost notes as a starter. In school I learned those a lot later. They only give an extra to the music, an extra a beginner doesn't need yet.

Most important of holding the sticks: thumb and index must hold the stick, the other fingers are for moving the stick. (and later for dubbel hits or whathever they're called in english).

At home: do your techniques and look at your movements (in the mirror), and try analyse it. Helped me

any other questions?
lalala
#8
ascend, no that won't work haha but maybe we can do it with a pad

didii, thanks! that helps a lot