#2
Well you know how to make it sound good, with the vibrato and slides, but your left hand technique isn't quite right, you need to keep your pinky above the fretboard and your thumb roughly adjacent to your middle finger behind the neck. Don't hide that pinky, keep it ready for use. I can't comment on tone because I still don't have the right gear for good tone but I know a bit about technique. Having your fingers curled in like that on your right hand is just fine, it tends to be a matter of comfort when it comes to that. But taking notes on the left hand technique I've just said will improve your playing precision & etc.
Last edited by deathofagod at Jul 23, 2011,
#3
Not bad. I'd have to agree with #2 that your hand technique isn't quite right. It seems you're letting your left hand sag too far below the neck. This will reduce efficiency, as your hand is not in position to be readily used. Check out some videos of other artists playing solos and observe their hands. That's not to say you won't find someone doing the same thing - you might. Just realize it's not the best technique and that you need to work on changing it.

Have you taken any lessons?
#4
heres what I notice.

you roll your wrist a lot instead of moving just the fingers. I know doing runs from the low E to high e you pretty much have to move your wrist a bit, but youre doing it on simple little single string pull off licks, to get the pull off sound from the wrist instead of your fingers. While its fine in the short term, in the long term it will limit your finger development.

secondarily, you need to utilize your pinky. you arent going to improve using only first and third finger. I know its easy to fall into that rut because those fingers are already strong so you want to use them. but believe me, as you develop the second and fourth finger your playing will improve drastically.

finally, and this is sort of nitpicky, but youre angling the fretboard up towards your face too much. now please dont take this the wrong way, but you seem kind of fat like me, so I know when I sit down my belly pushes the bottom of the guitar away from me lol. but it really helos improve your playing to keep the fretboard straight up and down so you arent constantly looking at your fingers. That way your brain will be forced to learn to feel where they areand man oh man, once that happens, you get so much better.

So what I do is when im sitting down I hold the guitar 3 or 4 inches away from my body so it can go straight up and down. standing up though, im just screwed. I probably need to do some situps. lol.
"When losers say it's over with you know that it's a lie
The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
#5
Wow awesome advice so far! I had never considered that rolling my wrist impacted my finger strength but it definitely makes sense.

I've been doing the string exercise where you fret 4 adjacent frets with each finger in varying patterns to work on my pinky strength. What other exercises are beneficial?

I'm self taught and I've never had a lesson so I'm not surprised that some of the 'basics' are off.

Also, I will definitely start watching peoples left hand form in videos from now on, so thank you.

Checklist:
- Keep fretboard flat
- Don't look at fingers
- Sit ups

#6
Quote by Strummin365

I've been doing the string exercise where you fret 4 adjacent frets with each finger in varying patterns to work on my pinky strength. What other exercises are beneficial?

for me I found those no guitar finger exercises indispensable for strength and dexterity of my left hand. I cant think of what theyre called atm, but basically you set your hand down flat on the table and lift the finger up one by one. then theres the side to side exercises.

It helps build the muscles faster than playing on the guitar IMO because it lets you focus solely on independent control without extraneous factors like notes/strings/etc. once you get the control down then add in the guitar rudiments. keep it simple and go one step at a time and might get there faster than you think. plus you can do them wherever. in the car, at work, at the bar...
heres a pretty decent video of what im talking about. it doesnt have the side to side, but im sure you can find that on own.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBJrTsNZVaw

if you cant find the side to side, heres a brief rundown.
start with all fingers together, laid flat on the table.
move pointer finger as far to the outside as possible.
move each finger one at a time towards the index finger.
now go back the other way starting with the pinky.

repeat in groupings of 2, 3 and 4


and heres one my american football coach would make us do as part of our Calisthenics. and nowadays I do this all the time when im out walking around or just doing whatever.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcZ6Jlaettc&feature=related

ETA: dont get discouraged if you try these, they are way more difficult than they look. Many of the grouping patterns are almost impossible at first, but keep at it.
"When losers say it's over with you know that it's a lie
The gods made heavy metal and it's never gonna die"
Last edited by kolonelkadat at Jul 23, 2011,
#7
I took lessons in bass but I'm self taught at guitar, y'know, sharing tips with other guitarists and such. One guitarist I know is a classical guitarist and really burned me for my left hand tech not so long ago and since I took note and started doing it "right" my playing has massively improved.
I really like threads like this, a lot of game-forum esque silliness is starting to happen in these forums lately :/
#8
Quote by deathofagod
I really like threads like this, a lot of game-forum esque silliness is starting to happen in these forums lately :/


What on earth does that even mean?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#9
Commented on the video. Keep in mind it's just my opinion, I'm no teacher.
• '10 Epiphone Les Paul
• '96 Epiphone Rebel EM-1
• '10 Jackson JS32T Rhoads
• Vox Valvetronix VT20+
• Fame GTA40
• Zoom GX7.1u
• Boss MT-2 Metal Zone
• Jim Dunlop Ultex Jazz III 2mm
#10
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
What on earth does that even mean?

Lol.

Anyway, Ive been working with the song, no problems working the pinky in. Not turning my wrist on bends and pull offs is a different story...
#12
Quote by Strummin365
Lol.

Anyway, Ive been working with the song, no problems working the pinky in. Not turning my wrist on bends and pull offs is a different story...


Using your wrist for bends and vibrato is in no way a bad thing, a lot of the people who are considered to have the strongest bends and vibrato use the wrist motion: lock the fingers in to place and shake the wrist.

For everything else though, yes, you do want the motion to be coming from the fingers and not the wrist.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#13
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Using your wrist for bends and vibrato is in no way a bad thing, a lot of the people who are considered to have the strongest bends and vibrato use the wrist motion: lock the fingers in to place and shake the wrist.

It's important to keep this in mind. Your wrist isn't very good at small energy, low force things like fretting notes, but it's pretty fantastic to more strength-intensive things like bends and vibrato.

That said, it's important to have good control over what kind of vibrato you use in a situation. Sometimes it's more appropriate to use larger, wider vibrato from your wrist whereas at others it is more appropriate to use smaller, less variable vibrato from your fingers (or doing classical vibrato with your wrist).