#1
what does it mean? I read in another thread that one of the common mistakes noobs make is not playing power chords with octaves.

For example, I play A power chord as 566xxx and G power chord as 355xxx etc u know. am i doing it right?
#3
Quote by Somekid94
In short, yes. You are doing it right.

what's the wrong way of doing it then???
#4
I don't know if that was a typo, but the A power chord is 577xxx

And the wrong way? Hitting the wrong notes I guess, not adding the fifth, but not adding the octave isn't going to mess up the power chord. Power chords without the octaves sound tighter, IMO, and are used a lot.

Remember, there's no right or wrong way to play the guitar.
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#5
Quote by icecoldstar
what's the wrong way of doing it then???

35XXXX (for the G), because the G you play on the 5th fret 4th string is the octave that people are referring to.
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#6
ya, it was a typo lol

and the way i'm playing, does that include the octave? sry i dont understand music theory very well and I'm still learing

and what do u mean not adding the fifth?
#7
Although the A chord is wrong (It's 577XXX. I imagine that's just a typo), that's what it means. The note on the highest string is one octave above the root note (the note on the lowest played strong), hence the "octave" in the name. That, along with the two strong variant (i.e. for A5 its 57XXXX), tend to be the most common way to play a power chord. I'm not certain as to why it is considered a common mistake (besides the two note version being easier to play), but you aren't making that same error.
#8
Before we get into the "chord" part of power chords and start a riot, I would like to point out that "power chord" is not an official term in music theory, so it's meaning is slightly changeable. But basically a power chord is an octave and the fifth degree. You CAN add the octave on the next string if you want to, whether or not you do, it is still a power chord.
#9
Quote by Skullivan
Before we get into the "chord" part of power chords and start a riot, I would like to point out that "power chord" is not an official term in music theory, so it's meaning is slightly changeable. But basically a power chord is an octave and the fifth degree. You CAN add the octave on the next string if you want to, whether or not you do, it is still a power chord.


This. If this thread were in MT, there'd have already somebody claiming that since power chords only have two notes (the root and fifth--octave doesn't count as a third note), it's technically an interval, not a chord.

TS: Yes, you're playing it right. The difference is whether you want that octave in there (a second A note in the 577xxx example). I personally use it almost every time; other people choose not to. As long as you like the sound and it's comfortable, keep doing it. That's what most of what music boils down to.
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#10
Quote by jwd724
This. If this thread were in MT, there'd have already somebody claiming that since power chords only have two notes (the root and fifth--octave doesn't count as a third note), it's technically an interval, not a chord.

I assume you were there for that flame war too?
#11
Quote by icecoldstar
I play A power chord as 566xxx


this is the epitome of doinitrite.

Quote by jwd724
This. If this thread were in MT, there'd have already somebody claiming that since power chords only have two notes (the root and fifth--octave doesn't count as a third note), it's technically an interval, not a chord.


your point?
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#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
this is the epitome of doinitrite.


your point?


you are retarded, gtfo of my thread. If you know how to read, you would see that I acknowledged that was a typo on my part.
#13
Quote by icecoldstar
you are retarded, gtfo of my thread. If you know how to read, you would see that I acknowledged that was a typo on my part.


if you could read, you'd see an edit button. why so butthurt? unless you're 12 or something.

don't worry, i'm not insulted. this kind of response from a novice is typical.
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#14
In those shapes you're playing the octave too, you should try and go learn at least that bit of theory (major/minor scales and how do they work in the fretboard), it's gonna help your playing a lot and let me stress it..."A LOT".

Let's use your example...the "A powerchord" 577xxx. The 5th fret on the low E string corresponds to the A note, that is your root note (and that's why it's the "A powerchord"). The 7th fret on the A string plays an E note, which happens to be the A's fifth , with just that you're already playing a "powerchord", this shape can be used everywhere on the fretboard (as long as you don't change the tuning) to play powerchords, only exception happens with the 2nd and 3rd string (B and G strings) where the fifth is one fret higher than usual (examples: xxx03x, xxx58x, etc.). Now, continuing with the first example, you're also playing the 7th fret on the D string, that plays an A note, this one is the octave, it's a higher A, this shape can be used only on the last three strings (D, A and E), examples on the other three strings would be things like xx356x and xxx588.
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#15
Quote by icecoldstar
what does it mean? I read in another thread that one of the common mistakes noobs make is not playing power chords with octaves.

For example, I play A power chord as 566xxx and G power chord as 355xxx etc u know. am i doing it right?

If you look at the G power chord you listed, you're fretting the third fret on the low E, which is G (this is called the root note); the 5th fret on the A string, which is D (this is the fifth) and the 5th fret on the D string, which is G again but one octave higher (this is called the octave).
The guy in the other thread was saying that it was wrong to play a power chord without the octave (so, in the above example,without playing the 5th fret of the D string), he was wrong. Power chords are still power chords with or without the octave and neither is wrong though they sound different; sometimes you may want the octave and sometimes you may not.
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#16
Quote by Aleksi
Power chords are still power chords with or without the octave and neither is wrong though they sound different; sometimes you may want the octave and sometimes you may not.


this is the answer you need. it's all about voicing.
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