#1
I am 16 years old and I have been playing the guitar for 6 months now. My family owns many different instruments. I don't know a lot about music theory, but I want to try out other instruments. Like a lot more. However, my mom thinks once I get into more instruments, I will neglect the guitar.

So would it be best to focus on one instrument at a time? Or would it be a good idea to play about 3 of instruments at a time, practicing them evenly? They will all be stringed instruments. Next year I will be going to college to take a music theory class, if that helps. And I will probably have lots of free time.

I just get really anxious about learning new instruments..... :
#2
I play and own: acoustic guitar, classical guitar, bass guitar, electric guitar, piano, ocarina, drums

Am very profficient at drums and guitars.

I started doing music only about 1.5 years ago.


I say, go for it.
#3
I play guitar primarily and dabble in drumming and playing piano.

There's no problem with it whatsoever. Go for it.
Not many people have access to a broad range of instruments like your family does. Take that opportunity to try different things. You might find something you like better than guitar.
#4
Play everything you want. Tell your mother that it would suck if you liked another instrument but had to just stick to guitar if your heart was set elsewhere.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#5
Learning more instruments only INCREASES your ability to become better at other instruments faster. Learn as many different instruments as possible.
1966 Stella Harmony Acoustic
Epiphone Dot Studio
Fender Starcaster (Made by 5 year olds in China)
THE Epiphone Mandolin
Dean 7 String (Totally Korean)
Yamaha C45m
Mitchell 12 MD100S



More Strings=More Range=More BadAssery
#6
TS, learn more instruments.

As long as you don't plan on becoming a virtuoso on 8 different instruments you won't have to neglect guitar. My primary instruments are Guitar and Piano but I still have plenty of time to play bass and viol.
#7
If you're going to take a music theory class, you should probably start looking at a keyboard. It will help, since most music theory classes use the piano for examples. It will help your guitar playing, too.
#8
Just be aware that the more instruments you play, the more time you will have to put into everything. You'll be a jack of all trades, but a master of none. If you don't mind that, and have the time, go for it.

Be aware though, unlike the guitar, you might need at least a basic background in music theory to be able to play other instruments. You'll have to know how to read music for example, and what the different notes are. Unlike the guitar, the violin, for example doesn't have tabs of popular songs for you to play. You'll have to read it from sheet music. Unlike the guitar, the violin doesn't have frets that you can number. You will have to know where each note is. The same applies for the cello, and for many stringed instrument besides the guitar.

The piano might be easier to start off on though since the notes are laid out very clearly, and requires you to read music on the grand clef, which is a good starting point. It's also a very versatile instrument.
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Jul 24, 2011,
#9
Quote by zincabopataurio
Just be aware that the more instruments you play, the more time you will have to put into everything. You'll be a jack of all trades, but a master of none. If you don't mind that, and have the time, go for it.

Be aware though, unlike the guitar, you might need at least a basic background in music theory to be able to play other instruments. You'll have to know how to read music for example, and what the different notes are. Unlike the guitar, the violin, for example doesn't have tabs of popular songs for you to play. You'll have to read it from sheet music. Unlike the guitar, the violin doesn't have frets that you can number. You will have to know where each note is. The same applies for the cello, and for many stringed instrument besides the guitar.

The piano might be easier to start off on though since the notes are laid out very clearly, and requires you to read music on the grand clef, which is a good starting point. It's also a very versatile instrument.


A little typo there; you of course mean the grand staff?
#10
Quote by Sóknardalr
A little typo there; you of course mean the grand staff?

Woops, thanks for the correction
#11
Quote by masada
I am 16 years old and I have been playing the guitar for 6 months now. My family owns many different instruments. I don't know a lot about music theory, but I want to try out other instruments. Like a lot more. However, my mom thinks once I get into more instruments, I will neglect the guitar.

So would it be best to focus on one instrument at a time? Or would it be a good idea to play about 3 of instruments at a time, practicing them evenly? They will all be stringed instruments. Next year I will be going to college to take a music theory class, if that helps. And I will probably have lots of free time.

I just get really anxious about learning new instruments..... :

you could learn a few at a time, but you may find that learning a new instrument is a lot easier once you have a grasp on one of them. if you played guitar for a few years, you know how music works, have an understanding of scales and chords so its just a matter of applying all that to another instrument.

i would say, go for it though. you are young and have not been playing that long. you may find you like another instrument more than another.
#12
Quote by zincabopataurio
Woops, thanks for the correction


I don't know how pianists do it, especially with difficult pieces. Unfortunately it's necessary because the piano has such a large range, but it's tedious as hell to compose or arrange music for the grand staff.
#13
Yes at instruments!!
It not only improves you're musical capabilities, but it means you can relate ideas to more proficient users of that instrument! Developments musicianship, which is essential to being a good guitarist.

Piano is a good start btw.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.
#14
Quote by Sóknardalr
it's tedious as hell to compose or arrange music for the grand staff.


Why so?
#15
Quote by griffRG7321
Why so?


I compose most of my stuff in Guitar Pro and when I write the stuff into a notation program (I'm starting to like MuseScore a lot) I have to split up the chords across the two staves. It's not difficult, just a bit tedious. "Tedious as hell" was a bit of an exaggeration, but I definitely find it a bit uncomfortable to think of one instrument split up across two staves.
#16
Quote by Sóknardalr
I compose most of my stuff in Guitar Pro and when I write the stuff into a notation program (I'm starting to like MuseScore a lot) I have to split up the chords across the two staves. It's not difficult, just a bit tedious. "Tedious as hell" was a bit of an exaggeration, but I definitely find it a bit uncomfortable to think of one instrument split up across two staves.


So you'd rather write a piece for piano on a single treble clef and use how many ledger lines?

Even when writing for guitar I don't use tab, I'm much quicker inputting the notes in standard notation, even quicker writing it on manuscript.
#17
Quote by griffRG7321
So you'd rather write a piece for piano on a single treble clef and use how many ledger lines?

Even when writing for guitar I don't use tab, I'm much quicker inputting the notes in standard notation, even quicker writing it on manuscript.


No, that's my point. It is absolutely necessary to have the grand staff, I just find it uncomfortable to work with. I usually use a 7 string guitar tuned down a fifth or more to write piano parts and a second track if I need chords larger than that (which is rarely because I don't really write solo piano music). It's works quite well.
#18
When I started playing piano it greatly improved my velocity and reduced my warm up time for violin. I would play a Mozart Sonata at mach speed and then pick up my violin to try and tackle one of the concertos I was working on at the time. It almost eliminated the need for a warm up! The same thing happened when I started taking theory, as I could recognize chords on the piano much easier. Many practice techniques are the same, including scales every day. cry
I would definitely advise picking up a second instrument, there are some things on certain instruments that are fairly easy that will help you to improve the extremely difficult things on others. For example octaves are extremely difficult on the violin when you first start them, but they are quite easy for me on piano.
Last edited by davidkk at Jul 25, 2011,
#19
As long as you have time for each instrument and you are willing to practice everyday tthen go for it
#20
Before I really focused on my multiinstrumentalism, I would go through short phases of playing one instrument more than any other. This is probably a good thing for first learning, but continuously doing this (playing without a long-term plan) will leave you lacking on all fronts. Start by attempting to learn two instruments seriously, but feel free to dabble in as many as you want. If you get the hang of seriously practicing two instruments simultaneously, then move on to a third.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#21
2 of the most versatile guitarists ever play a numerous amount of instruments, these people are Buckethead and Shawn Lane.

As for Shawn, There's a video of him Playing the piano phenomenally here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4A2vG0GsG54

Bucket on the Bass
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVB-qcLQWas

The moral of the story is: GO FOR IT!
Last edited by Avant-Piers at Jul 27, 2011,
#22
Contary to everyone else who posted here, SCREW IT, stick to the guitar for another 6 months or so before you set out trying to play another instrument.
Until you've mastered guitar, don't bother trying to master another instrument.
METAL!
#23
Quote by Ultraussie
Contary to everyone else who posted here, SCREW IT, stick to the guitar for another 6 months or so before you set out trying to play another instrument.
Until you've mastered guitar, don't bother trying to master another instrument.



I'd advise against this. Reason being that you can't master guitar. There will always be someone better than you or just as good. I consider myself a multinstrumentist. I play guitar, piano, bass, a little bit of drums, and I have a trumpet (I can't play it!) I have not mastered any of these. I've been playing guitar 6 years and I'm far from a master. But I'm an advance player.