#3
It had some nice harmonies and melodies but for the most part it was kinda boring to listen to. What you have is good. It just needs to be more interesting
#4
Quote by amonamarthmetal
It had some nice harmonies and melodies but for the most part it was kinda boring to listen to. What you have is good. It just needs to be more interesting

so what i have to do to make it more interesting?
#5
To elaborate on amonarmarthmetal's post, I'd say the biggest pitfall would be that the choir's and string section's harmonies are all moving in parallel motion, making for a very linear and thin sound overall. In Classical theory, this is something that's avoided for that very reason, but it's not all too difficult to practice and refine.
For example, your opening choir line consists of the same melodic line but in three octaves, but could be very-much thickened up and made more musically enticing by having counter melodies, or each voice moving in either different directions or crossing different intervals, or a combination of each. You could work out the chord implied by each note to help you decide (or narrow down) which notes to use, and/or you could listen-out for alternate melodies that could compliment your existing lines. You may even want to listen to some Gregorian chant or church chorales to hear this used in context to great effect.
The very same approach can be applied to your string section, since doubling or tripling the same note in different registers can realistically sound very thin in comparison to a rich harmony or polyphonic web of melodies.
Last edited by juckfush at Jul 24, 2011,
#6
http://www.listeningarts.com/music/general_theory/species/menu.htm

You might want to have a look at that if you're at all interested in the sort of thing mentioned above. Even just having a vague idea of the rules has helped me enormously when writing harmonies and chord progressions.

Anyway, I did really like I and II, they had a really bleak and doomy sound, and that one high F in II had a great impact. Although I would say that chord progression is a bit overused, and it did drag a bit, particularly in the parts with only choir. Some melody over the chords might add interest, but I understand that having settled into that slow doomy pace any faster melody might break it, so I'd suggest maybe using more layered textures, and more complex chords, maybe with some tasteful dissonance that could add to the bleakness. Building up to complex and dissonant chords from simpler ones can be really effective.

The first thing I thought of to demonstrate what I mean was the first minute or so of this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2zIVt0wM28&feature=related

Not sure if that's at all helpful, or if it fits into your plan for the piece, but it's an idea anyway.
I'LL PUNCH A DONKEY IN THE STREETS OF GALWAY
Last edited by whalepudding at Jul 25, 2011,
#7
Quote by whalepudding
http://www.listeningarts.com/music/general_theory/species/menu.htm

You might want to have a look at that if you're at all interested in the sort of thing mentioned above. Even just having a vague idea of the rules has helped me enormously when writing harmonies and chord progressions.

Anyway, I did really like I and II, they had a really bleak and doomy sound, and that one high F in II had a great impact. Although I would say that chord progression is a bit overused, and it did drag a bit, particularly in the parts with only choir. Some melody over the chords might add interest, but I understand that having settled into that slow doomy pace any faster melody might break it, so I'd suggest maybe using more layered textures, and more complex chords, maybe with some tasteful dissonance that could add to the bleakness. Building up to complex and dissonant chords from simpler ones can be really effective.

The first thing I thought of to demonstrate what I mean was the first minute or so of this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2zIVt0wM28&feature=related

Not sure if that's at all helpful, or if it fits into your plan for the piece, but it's an idea anyway.



could you show me how i must to do it? i wish to see how it will sound into my song.please
#8
Quote by Rossielle
could you show me how i must to do it? i wish to see how it will sound into my song.please


I threw together an example of voice leading. The first bit is employing some techniques in the context of what you have written. I did have to break a couple of the rules however because 6 voice part writing is a little unruly. The second bit after that shows a cleaner example of voice leading with 4 part harmony. Forgive me if there are any errors, I didn't proof it thoroughly

These are some of the voice leading rules that are handy. These all apply when possible, but in cases where you're writing for more than four voices you'll most likely have to use more colorful chords (7ths, 9ths etc) or just break some of the rules. I'm writing these as I would for 4 part.

AVOID - Parallel fifths, octaves, unisons.

Try to keep all voices fairly equally spaced (does not include the bass, only the upper three voices).

Avoid voice overlap and voice crossing, these are a little harder to explain without a visual. If you google it you'll probably see, but it's usually very easy to avoid and doesn't matter too much for part writing in this situation.

Try to keep voices in their respective ranges (although it isn't important here. Only if an instrument or voice has a limited range).

TYPES OF MOTION

Motion types are most prominent when between the highest and lowest voices.

Contrary motion =
. it is when voices move in opposite directions. You'll notice I tried to do that often between the soprano (highest) and bass (lowest) in my second example.

Oblique motion =
This is when one voice stays on the same note while the other moves to a different note.

Similar motion =
. That is when two notes move in the same direction but not by the same amount. An example is octave G's, the upper voice moves up to a C, while the lower voice moves up to an A.

Parallel motion =
and avoid when possible. Acceptable parallels are thirds and sixths. Fourths are okay (if memory serves me correctly). Parallel = two intervals moving the same distance to the exact same interval. For example, you have octave G's, and move them both up to octave A's. That gives an empty, hollow sound that we want to avoid.


I forget everything else I was going to say, but maybe some of this novel I just typed will help you out.

The most important ones you'll want to keep in mind are to avoid parallel motion and aim for contrary, keep the spacing equalish, and to move your chord tones to the closest viable option when possible. That doesn't apply to the melody of course. Sometimes you'll have to work around a melody, but just do it when possible as long as it gets the sound you like.
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Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jul 31, 2011,