#1
I was tring to learn no one knows by queens of the stone age, which is in either c standard or drop c and i was wondering how important droptuning is to get the tone, as the song worked pretty well in e just using the notes for drop c. i have also found this with songs such as children of the grave (black sabbath) and the outsider ( a perfect circle). I've found i can get a pretty good tone for the last tone in standard e and wouldn't have beem able to tell they were in drop c if i didn't know they were. how different is downtuning to just having a deep, bassy tone in e? I mean this soundwise not in terms of playability
#2
C Standard and Drop C are so far from being the same its not even funny.

Drop C: CGCFAD
C Std. : CFA#D#GC (I think, Never tune to C Standard, thats just off of memory)
E Std. : EADGBE

Basically, it will make all the difference in the world.

Edit: As you see, even with E standard, none of the notes (accepts for that C) are the same. Everything will sound completely off, and if you played the song to another musician, they could tell, quite easily.

Get a tuner, or just stop being lazy and tune.
Where's Waldo?
Last edited by chadreed32 at Jul 24, 2011,
#3
Your ears aren't very developed if you think E standard sounds at all like C standard or drop C. They do make a difference, develop your ears padawan.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#4
it only really makes a difference if the notes are lower, beyond that its mostly preference.... so if you have a song where the lowest note is a say G it really won't matter what tuning you're in, but if you need a low c it will matter, also somethings become easier/harder with drop or standard
#5
but if there's a huge difference surely then me playing a tab that's in c in e it will sound completly off. admittedly i haven't played many songs that are meant to be in drop c, but when i do they sound fine, suggesting there isn't a huge difference.

i did in fact tune a guitar to drop c prior to making this thread, but without a proper set-up it won't work properly and it still sounded fairly similar, just more loose
#6
you feel it differently
it takes your writing and playing in a different direction
i personally (am a bit nuts) and have guitars set up in standard, Eb, D standard, C# standard and drop D

i play each one very differently
Taylor 314CE
Modulus G2T and G3CT
3 Warmoth Guitars
2 Fender MIA Strats--SRV & JM
Alvarez w/ Modulus Neck and EMG DG-20s
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50 w/ 1960a cab
Breedlove AC250/SM12
Gold Tone Weissenborn
Adrenalinn III & FCB1010
ALOT of pedals
#7
Quote by teh_goon
but if there's a huge difference surely then me playing a tab that's in c in e it will sound completly off. admittedly i haven't played many songs that are meant to be in drop c, but when i do they sound fine, suggesting there isn't a huge difference.

i did in fact tune a guitar to drop c prior to making this thread, but without a proper set-up it won't work properly and it still sounded fairly similar, just more loose


Your ears are drunk or something

E standard will always and forever sound miles apart from drop C or C standard. I have no idea what the hell you're doing, but they don't sound remotely similar.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#8
The songs played in C standard sound the "same" to you because all you've done is transposed the songs from C standard tuning to E standard tuning. So while the riffs are the same, it is still drastically changed. I mostly use alternative tunings if I'm in a band situation and changing the tuning would make it easier on the singer.
Gig Rig:

Schecter Hellraiser V-1
Crate BV120H
B-52 LS 4x12 cabinet
BBE Rackmount Sonic Max
Boss ME-50 Pedalboard
Digital Reference 2505 Wireless

I don't like BTBAM. Sue Me.

PLUR

My Solo Project
#9
Quote by teh_goon
but if there's a huge difference surely then me playing a tab that's in c in e it will sound completly off. admittedly i haven't played many songs that are meant to be in drop c, but when i do they sound fine, suggesting there isn't a huge difference.

i did in fact tune a guitar to drop c prior to making this thread, but without a proper set-up it won't work properly and it still sounded fairly similar, just more loose


I played Blood and Thunder at a show once in E standard instead of D standard. Didn't make a huge difference, but it was noticeable. Also played Bloodmeat in E instead of Eb, which wasn't a big deal at all. It depends on if you're just playing the tab as it is in E instead of C or if you're transposing the notes so that they mostly match the C tuning notes.
#10
Quote by chadreed32
C Standard and Drop C are so far from being the same its not even funny.

Drop C: CGCFAD
C Std. : CFA#D#GC (I think, Never tune to C Standard, thats just off of memory)
E Std. : EADGBE

Basically, it will make all the difference in the world.

Edit: As you see, even with E standard, none of the notes (accepts for that C) are the same. Everything will sound completely off, and if you played the song to another musician, they could tell, quite easily.

Get a tuner, or just stop being lazy and tune.


You can transpose a song is C Standard to Drop C fairly easy.

And yes. If you think a song that is written for C Standard/Drop C sounds good in E, then you're ears arent very developed. Theres a 2 whole-step difference between those tunings, they sound nothing alike. The pattern of the notes you play will be the same, so it'll sound "familiar" but it wont sound "correct"
Quote by satanicgurrl
Is this amazing? Could it be?
This newly posted mp3

Quoth the server "4 0 3"


Official Gain Wh0re

Gear:

  • ESP LTD EC-1000 Black Cherry
  • Hartke LH500 Full Stack
  • Line 6 Pod HD Pro
#11
Try singing along to it in E standard. It will then be apparent just how much of a difference it makes ;P
#12
Quote by Lovecannon
You can transpose a song is C Standard to Drop C fairly easy.


Other way around?
And the fact that he cant tell the difference tells me he wont be transposing anything, so they would sound really different.
Where's Waldo?
Last edited by chadreed32 at Jul 24, 2011,
#13
You should be able to tell the difference between an E and a C with your ears, if you can't then you should train your ears until you can. Surely there will be some useful information available on this site somewhere.
Quote by lockedandlogan
Let me get this straight. You're asking a bunch of people who are sitting at their computers, likely due to boredom, what to do for fun.



Quote by GaijinFoot
Old chinese proverb says: Man goes to bed with itchy bum, wakes up with smelly finger

Wise words
#14
With me, I generally play in E flat, but alot of the bands I like play in drop C. I just simply tune my E down to drop D (or drop D flat) and play the song as the tab reads.

There is a difference, and the pitch is not right so you wont be able to play along with the song successfully unless you tune down, but the techniques and patterns you learn can USUALLY be carried over from drop C to drop D.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#15
For me, there is a huge difference not only in the feel, but the tone for each tuning. A notable example is pinch harmonics. Pinches sound drastically different in drop tunings and each one (for me) has a much different mood. Trying to play a BTBAM song (C# standard) in E sounds absolutely terrible. However, you'd be surprised what a huge difference it can make tuning from E just down to E flat. It can change the entire feel of the song. On the other hand though, as long as the song doesn't contain a lot of open notes, it is fairly easy to play songs meant for different tunings in E standard. You'll have a lot of trouble with leads probably, but as long as you have basic knowledge of where notes are located, it's not really that hard. Inverted 5th chords are your best friend. Try playing a D power chord on your A string and cover the 5th fret on your E string as well. It will sound just like a low D chord. Just play around with it. Half of the fun of learning guitar and the writing process is experimenting.
IDDQD: DEGRELESSNESS MODE ON!

"I've fought the decisions that call and lost my mark as the relevant piece in this. I will come reformed. In short, for the murders of those I court, I bless the hour that holds your fall. I will kill you all."