#1
I recently bought a cheap guitar off a friend, and yesterday he helped me swap out the old bridge humbucker with a Seymour Duncan JB model. At first we thought we had successfully installed the pickup, however after playing the guitar, I realized that the humbucker sounded like a single coil pickup. It sounded twangy and had no punch. I figured I had wired the humbucker wrong, splitting the coil, making it sound like a single coil pickup. After looking online, I discovered that different companies color code their wire differently. I didn't know this beforehand, and I just swapped the wires with the exact same colors of the old pickup. After Trying to fix the wires, I now have no sound coming out of the guitar at all. I have no idea what I did wrong, and I'm not touching the wires again until I know exactly what to solder.

Also, if this is important, the make of the guitar is Aslin Dane. The guitar has 3 pickups, two single coils, and a humbucker in the bridge position. There is one volume control, and one tone. Instead of a 3 or 5 way pickup selector switch like most strat-type guitars, this guitar has 3 different switches, one that switches on or off each individual pickup. I couldn't find any diagrams online for this type of guitar, and now I don't know what to solder where. The first time, I soldered the red and black wires together, the white went to the tone control, and the green went to the pickup switch. The second time, I soldered the red and white together (I read you always do that with Seymour Duncans), put the black on the tone control, and the green remained on the switcher. This time I got no sound. I am completely lost right now, and I'm not touching the guitar again until I figure it out. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.

By the way, I can post pictures of the current and original wiring if needed
#2
Post those pictures.
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#5
And I tried those wiring diagrams already, my guitar is kinda wierd though and I couldn't find any diagrams that specifically fit my guitar.
#6
do you have a voltmeter?
first thing will be to unwrap the edges of the humbucker, just pull the tape back.
from there you can tell first, which wire is the ground. second, look to see which wire goes to the outside of one coil, and which 2 wires come from between the coils. visually you should hopefully be able to see which are the ends and which are the shunt wires.

if not, use the voltmeter checking for continuity (resistance in ohms), have all 4 wires separate. if you have continuity, you are holding the ends of one of the coils, if there is no continuity, try another set of wires until you get continuity. you will still have to try visually to see which is the outter and which is the inner wire while doing this.

but with all that you should be able to figure it out
#7
Quote by xadioriderx
do you have a voltmeter?
first thing will be to unwrap the edges of the humbucker, just pull the tape back.
from there you can tell first, which wire is the ground. second, look to see which wire goes to the outside of one coil, and which 2 wires come from between the coils. visually you should hopefully be able to see which are the ends and which are the shunt wires.

if not, use the voltmeter checking for continuity (resistance in ohms), have all 4 wires separate. if you have continuity, you are holding the ends of one of the coils, if there is no continuity, try another set of wires until you get continuity. you will still have to try visually to see which is the outter and which is the inner wire while doing this.

but with all that you should be able to figure it out


Thanks for the advice. No I don't have a voltmeter. But actually, about two hours ago, I was jiggling a few of the wires around, and I figured I might as well test the pickups one more time. After plugging in the guitar I discovered that the pickups were working again. I had no idea that that would actually work, but for some reason it did. I restrung the guitar and everything sounded great. It sounded like a humbucker this time, so I know all the wires are in the right spot. But after about a half hour of playing, the sound started to crackle. The sound kept crapping out on me. If I jiggle the volume knob around a little the sound starts to come back, but it craps out again almost immediatly. Then I have no sound on any pickups just like before. I know all the wires are soldered to the correct places now, but maybe I have a bad solder joint somewhere or something?
#9
Quote by ethan_hanus
SD uses the same color code as BKP, green and white get soldered together, red goes to switch, black goes to pot, bare braided wire goes to the pot as well.


Really? I always heard that it was red and white that get soldered together with SD.
And I think all the wires are in the right spot now. As I mentioned in my last post, I did get it to work after jiggling the wires around a few hours ago. I used the red with white wiring configuration and it sounded good. Now I need to fix the problem of it crapping out repeatedly.
#10
Quote by nick1394
Really? I always heard that it was red and white that get soldered together with SD.
And I think all the wires are in the right spot now. As I mentioned in my last post, I did get it to work after jiggling the wires around a few hours ago. I used the red with white wiring configuration and it sounded good. Now I need to fix the problem of it crapping out repeatedly.



Most pickup makers who use the standard 4 conductor wire, red, black, green, white, bare will follow the same rules, I say most cause I don't think they all do, but I do know that BKP and SD use the exact same color code, I've been using their wiring diagrams on my BKP's for a while, and they work perfectly.

You can solder red and white together, but it's best if white and green are soldered together. As for the jiggling wires around, I had that same problem, I don't know what causes it, just make sure the bare wire isen't touching any of the other pots, and make sure none of the wires are being pinched.
#11
Quote by ethan_hanus
SD uses the same color code as BKP, green and white get soldered together, red goes to switch, black goes to pot, bare braided wire goes to the pot as well.

That's completly wrong. On a Seymour Duncan the black is your hot, green & bare wires get grounded and the red & white wires get soldered together.

Here's a pickup color code chart for several brands.
http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/rr151/zakkwyldefan79/Guitar%20Wiring%20Diagrams/PickupColorCodeChart-1.jpg
#12
Quote by zakkwyldefan79
That's completly wrong. On a Seymour Duncan the black is your hot, green & bare wires get grounded and the red & white wires get soldered together.

Here's a pickup color code chart for several brands.
http://i479.photobucket.com/albums/rr151/zakkwyldefan79/Guitar%20Wiring%20Diagrams/PickupColorCodeChart-1.jpg


Even according to your chart I'm still right.

If you solder the red and white together, it'll end up being south finish soldered to the north finish, that would cause the pickup to not even work.

Ok, wait, I see it now, SD and the BKP styles are just flipped, so if you solder the red to switch and the black to pot, and the green and white get soldered together, with BKP it'll end up being the north coil first in chain, and with the SD wired the same it'll be the south coil first. Either way it works.

My way still works though.