#1
if you were to play a standard A5 power chord with root on 6th string I see the intervalic distance is a 5th. But how come when you play


e-------
b--------
g---2----
d---2----
a-------
e-------

why is this still an A5 when it is a 4th interval?
#2
Quote by Unreal T
if you were to play a standard A5 power chord with root on 6th string I see the intervalic distance is a 5th. But how come when you play


e-------
b--------
g---2----
d---2----
a-------
e-------

why is this still an A5 when it is a 4th interval?


It's still the same notes as a A5, except with the E as the lowest note instead of A.
#3
maybe i am making this harder than it really is . yeah i know but..i thought sounds were defined by their distance between the notes. and thats a 4th not a 5th. its an inversion but it still seems weird how it sounds like an A5
#4
Thats an E4 not an A5. it only an A5 when the root is A followed by a 5th. if the lowest sound is E, then the root is E. I this case anyways
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#5
yeah, this isn't an A5, it is an E4....I guess technically you could call it an inverted A5....if you can call dyads inversions...
#6
A5 'power chord' consist generally of the notes A and E. It doesn't matter which inversion you play (aka which one is higher/lower) it's still gonna sound the same (well more or less). Not to mention, when you play this with the root on 6th string (aka 577xxx) you play the exactly same notes, just in your case you dropped one root.

inversions sound similar when played at once, because they contain the same notes, the 'order' doesn't matter that much (just changes the tone a bit). The difference you seem to expect is gonna come when you play each note separately.
#7
It's just cause it's an inversion, that chord is an A5 first inversion.

Your looking at it as if its a new chord.


Lets take a D major chord.
D, F# and a A. Root, major 3rd and a perfect 5th.

First inversion is F#, A and a D.
If we look at that separate from the D chord (which is how your looking at your A5). Its a Root, Minor 3rd, #5th.

Which would be a F#minor with a sharp 5. Or a D over F#.

Yeah the chords sound the same or similar. That's cause the notes are the same. It's an F#minor #5, but also a D Major :p.

You would play an F#minor #5 instead of a D if you wanted the F# to be the lowest note for example.

It seems weird and confusing yeah. Just gotta get use to the fact that most chords, also have other names :p. Depending how you look at them.
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#8
Sup kids. Chords (and keys) are determined by where they resolve/what is the root.

If you are given the notes A and E:

- If A is the root, the result is A5.

- If E is the root, the result is E4.

That's just the start of it though, the root could be neither A nor E resulting in a completely different chord.
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#9
It depends on context. As Alan said, it could be either A5 or E4.
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#10
Quote by AlanHB
Sup kids. Chords (and keys) are determined by where they resolve/what is the root.

If you are given the notes A and E:

- If A is the root, the result is A5.

- If E is the root, the result is E4.

That's just the start of it though, the root could be neither A nor E resulting in a completely different chord.

alan's right. but you might need a couple more details...

the root note isn't the same as the bass note, just because 1 note is lower doesn't mean its the root, it could be an inversion (when you put a note other than the root as the bass note), the bass note is whatever note is lowest pitch.

this could also be a rootless voicing of a bigger chord. let's say you played this diad while a bass player played an F and a C. this could end up as an Fmajor7, or maybe even a Cmajor13 with the 7 and 9 omitted (probly not...)
#11
Quote by AlanHB
Sup kids. Chords (and keys) are determined by where they resolve/what is the root.

If you are given the notes A and E:

- If A is the root, the result is A5.

- If E is the root, the result is E4.

That's just the start of it though, the root could be neither A nor E resulting in a completely different chord.


just putting it out there -- this kind of thought kind of points to the whole "power chords are not chords" argument. i mean, if power chords are chords, then the chord TS posted must be an A5, inversion or otherwise.

whatever. i'm not here. shh, nobody wake the bear up.

Quote by stratele
It's just cause it's an inversion, that chord is an A5 first inversion.

Your looking at it as if its a new chord.


Lets take a D major chord.
D, F# and a A. Root, major 3rd and a perfect 5th.

First inversion is F#, A and a D.
If we look at that separate from the D chord (which is how your looking at your A5). Its a Root, Minor 3rd, #5th.

Which would be a F#minor with a sharp 5. Or a D over F#.

Yeah the chords sound the same or similar. That's cause the notes are the same. It's an F#minor #5, but also a D Major :p.

You would play an F#minor #5 instead of a D if you wanted the F# to be the lowest note for example.

It seems weird and confusing yeah. Just gotta get use to the fact that most chords, also have other names :p. Depending how you look at them.


except you'd never call that F#m(#5), because it's a D, not a Cx. D is b6 from F#, not #5.

though i get that you're telling him to look at it as an inversion rather than a new chord, which is entirely correct.
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#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
just putting it out there -- this kind of thought kind of points to the whole "power chords are not chords" argument. i mean, if power chords are chords, then the chord TS posted must be an A5, inversion or otherwise.

whatever. i'm not here. shh, nobody wake the bear up.


I considered this as I was writing, but then thought "I am not going through this crap again", so simply neglected to mention it.

Edit: I said something here that was meant to be funny, but it came off as quite dark, so I just removed it
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#14
I've seen that chord shape in hundreds of metal/rock songs and not once I've heard it called E4. It's very common to chug the A string which really removes the last doubts that it's not A5. Just try playing it, it sounds like a power chord.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#15
Quote by rockingamer2
It depends on context. As Alan said, it could be either A5 or E4.


Context, context, context. The situations that you could see this interval in are infinite; it's highly unlikely that you'd ever see it in complete isolation like this. When you see this in an actual song, you must analyze what is happening all around it and make an interpretation as a musician.
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#16
Quote by griffRG7321
Ummm Hai Guise, so is a power chord a chord or not?



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#17
Quote by Unreal T
if you were to play a standard A5 power chord with root on 6th string I see the intervalic distance is a 5th. But how come when you play


e-------
b--------
g---2----
d---2----
a-------
e-------

why is this still an A5 when it is a 4th interval?


It's just inverted. In most cases the A is still heard as the root, so it sounds/ functions as an A5 power chord.
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