#1
I have a question about triplets, in blues many times I see triplets with 16th notes in it, and others sextolets with 16th notes, are they the same thing? I assume that two triplets with 3 16th notes each is the same as a sextolet with 6 16th notes. I might be wrong. But, what happens when you have 16th notes inserted in an 8th note triplet. Thank you guys. Do you know of any video where they explain this?
#2
I think you're mixing note grouping with the duration of a particular set of notes. If in both examples you have triplets with 16th notes, that's the duration: 16th note triplets, but the sextolets you're talking are just 16th note triplets in groupings of 6 (or 2 triplets)

So yes two triplets with 3 16th notes each is the same as a sextolet with 6 16th notes.
#3
Quote by symba05
I think you're mixing note grouping with the duration of a particular set of notes. If in both examples you have triplets with 16th notes, that's the duration: 16th note triplets, but the sextolets you're talking are just 16th note triplets in groupings of 6 (or 2 triplets)

So yes two triplets with 3 16th notes each is the same as a sextolet with 6 16th notes.

So, I have an eighth note triplet in which the two first notes are ommited and the last one is subdivided into 2 16th notes, should I treat that as a sextolet?
Something like (tttt)tt, or more like a triplet: (one-tri)-tt? What is the best way to count it? can you read it easier by feel than by counting? Thank your for your answer, it really helps.
#4
Quote by ponchete
So, I have an eighth note triplet in which the two first notes are ommited and the last one is subdivided into 2 16th notes, should I treat that as a sextolet?
Something like (tttt)tt, or more like a triplet: (one-tri)-tt? What is the best way to count it? can you read it easier by feel than by counting? Thank your for your answer, it really helps.


I'd count it as a triplet. 1 and a 2 and a... In that case, if the two first notes are omitted, the third note will be played on the first "a", which can be a little weird.

For me, specially when playing blues, I find it easier to feel the beat and to be aware how much am I playing in front or behind the beat. By omitting the two first notes, that player is really trying to fall on the beat and play behind it, that gives that "swing" quality that's really frequent in the blues.
#5
Quote by symba05
I'd count it as a triplet. 1 and a 2 and a... In that case, if the two first notes are omitted, the third note will be played on the first "a", which can be a little weird.

For me, specially when playing blues, I find it easier to feel the beat and to be aware how much am I playing in front or behind the beat. By omitting the two first notes, that player is really trying to fall on the beat and play behind it, that gives that "swing" quality that's really frequent in the blues.

totally clear thank yoy!!!