#1
Tomorrow i'm hoping to try and record my band's practise session. I've never done this before and i'm not expecting any great results so i thought i'd ask around here first.

The setup is going to be a simple:
Rode NT1-A - M-Audio Fast Track Pro - Cubase 5 on Laptop

I'll play around with the mic placement but the sessions are pretty damn loud so will the NT1-A cope with the volumes? My interface has a pad button on it so is it worth using that?
#2
I reckon that would work fine. You could always apply some light compression Pre-record on the track, that might control the levels a bit. Just don't set the mic up too close and you should be fine!

Alternatively, just don't be so loud? The overall mix will be better, easier to record, and you'll actually hear vocals.

Does the NT1 have an omni setting? or just Cardioid?
Last edited by shmeegle at Jul 25, 2011,
#3
Quote by shmeegle
I reckon that would work fine. You could always apply some light compression Pre-record on the track, that might control the levels a bit. Just don't set the mic up too close and you should be fine!

Alternatively, just don't be so loud? The overall mix will be better, easier to record, and you'll actually hear vocals.


That was my first thought when reading this.
The only 'issue' (if you can call it that, it's not a problem by any means, it's just what I would do in that situation) is that you'll end up with a mono recording. you'd be better off to find two identical (or at the very least, similiar) microphones, use 2 inputs, one mic on the left of the room, and one on the right, and get a stereo recording. Even if your mic' can operate as omnidirectional, it ought to work instead of 2 seperate mic's.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
Last edited by Carl6661 at Jul 25, 2011,
#4
Ok cool. I'll give light compression a try if the levels are a tad too high. And no, it's only Cardioid.

Also, we've got a drummer in our band and we play metal so i don't think being quieter is an option .
Last edited by Afroboy267 at Jul 25, 2011,
#5
Seriously, being quieter is always an option.

Even In Metal, this notion that music only has BALLS if it's ****ing loud is complete and utter bullshit. Start with the drums, then bring the bass in, then guitars. As each piece comes in, set the volume to where it NEEDS to be.

The louder things get, the more clarity you lose. When you go to proper metal gigs (say... lamb of god or whatever, plying a proper stage and not some shitty pub down the road) the volume you're hearing isn't just drums, bass and guitars cranked to 10. Everything will be kept down, to what each member needs to hear.

The actual loudness is all through the PA. Which is guarenteed to be ****ing huge. If everything on stage was cranked, all you'd hear was shit.

Just try it. Lower the volume, and I guarentee your recordings will sound better.
#6
Why bother? We all use earplugs and the drummer is comfortable with his playing so we don't want to change practise. Live is a different situation. The volumes can actually be controlled whereas a practise in a small space with an acoustic kit isn't that controllable without discomfort.

Anyway, we've talked about the recording so no need to start a shit storm now really, aha.
#7
Its going to be very drum heavy...almost unbearable
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#10
one of the most important things when trying to record stuff with one mic is the placement of the instruments/amplifiers. most bands seem to practice in the same sort of setup they would play in live, everyone facing one way. or at least most of the ones ive seen practice anyway.

of course this is the wrong way to go about it unless youve got monitors. if you get something a bit better set up, you can probably get a better sound out of a single mic recording. if you set everyone up so they are facing a semi-central point, with drummer sort of on one side and guitars/bass sorta facing him, you might get better results. that way you can move the mic more towards the amps to capture more of that sound.

angling the amps so they arent in a perfect line helps too, in my experience. having anything directly face a wall or another band member isnt ideal. so instead of worrying just about mic placement for your recording, work with your room setup as well.
#11
Yeah. We usually have the amps around the front of the drummer at the sides of the room. We got the recordings so we're happy but thanks anyhow!
#12
Another tip simply for the band thing...

Your band's volume is decided by the drummer. The best drummers in the world can still get aggressive and ballsy while tip-tapping on the kit. Even with earplugs, you still experience damaging dB levels in a small practice room. I've basically worked on slowly lowering my volume with each practice, and my drummer adjusts ever so slightly each time so he can hear me (we face the amps at him, angled upwards to help as well).

Do this a few times and eventually you'll get to safer levels
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#13
The band's volume, though, is often *limited* by the ability of the PA system to get the vocals to a level where the singer can be heard without blowing out his/her voice.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.