#1
So i can play alot of chords, however, its not all of the chords i know,that i know where i "can" put them. For example i found a chord i liked the sound of, and figured out that it was a major7b5. However i didnt know where i could use this. Is there any sites on the internet that shows where you can put chords and how it works?, (if its diatonic, if if it adds tension, resolves etc...) Im not a master in theory as you probably can tell...
#2
You don't need any books, sites or someone to tell you how to use chords. There's a magical thing called...wait for it...

Analysis!

There is some basic harmonic principles covered on the musictheory.net website though.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 25, 2011,
#3
^ The dude's right. Listen to what sounds good. Experiment. That will probably get you further than any theory book.
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#4
Well, im going to write all chords i know on a word ducument (so i can keep track of all chords i learnt). I have seen one of my books (Norwegian book) that you shuld divide all chords into 6 sections:
-Major
-Minor
-Minor 7
-Minor 7b5
-Dominant 7
-Diminished 7

In my other theory book (frank gamble technique book 1) it says:
-Minor 7
-Major 7
-Unaltered Dominant 7
-Altered Dominant 7
-Minor 7 b5
-Diminished

What of these two seem most acurate? Also why is there one group for minor and one for minor 7 in the first one? Anyway, how do i know if a dominant chords is altered or unaltered?
#5
Sounds like you're into jazz, or at least read jazz books. Honestly, I would have one category for each type of triad and add a final category for dominants.

-Major
-Minor
-Diminished
-Augmented
-Dominant

A m7b5 is also known as a 'half-diminished' chord; I believe it is mostly called the former in jazz circles, but it's functionally a diminished chord. I use the 'm7b5' notation on the forum, too, but only because you can't get a good approximation of the half-diminshed symbol on a keyboard (it's the diminished 'degree' sign with a slash through it.)

There will definitely be valor in making this more specific, like your books recommend in a jazz context. It really just depends on what system makes the most sense to you: this is for your benefit, after all.
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#6
Quote by soviet_ska
Sounds like you're into jazz, or at least read jazz books. Honestly, I would have one category for each type of triad and add a final category for dominants.

-Major
-Minor
-Diminished
-Augmented
-Dominant

A m7b5 is also known as a 'half-diminished' chord; I believe it is mostly called the former in jazz circles, but it's functionally a diminished chord. I use the 'm7b5' notation on the forum, too, but only because you can't get a good approximation of the half-diminshed symbol on a keyboard (it's the diminished 'degree' sign with a slash through it.)

There will definitely be valor in making this more specific, like your books recommend in a jazz context. It really just depends on what system makes the most sense to you: this is for your benefit, after all.

Oh that seems like a much easyer way to system it!
But can i use all chords (or at least most chords) in this system? What about suspentions?
#7
Quote by Usernames sucks
Oh that seems like a much easyer way to system it!
But can i use all chords (or at least most chords) in this system? What about suspentions?


Anything triadic (based on thirds) would generally fit into this system. Good point about suspensions... . They are technically neither major nor minor, but they usually either become major/minor (Gsus2 -> G or Gsus -> Gm) or replace a typical triad (such as Esus4 for E in the key of B.) They are too contextual to fit into this system unless you add a catch-all category for 'Non-Triadic Chords.'
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#8
Quote by soviet_ska
Anything triadic (based on thirds) would generally fit into this system. Good point about suspensions... . They are technically neither major nor minor, but they usually either become major/minor (Gsus2 -> G or Gsus -> Gm) or replace a typical triad (such as Esus4 for E in the key of B.) They are too contextual to fit into this system unless you add a catch-all category for 'Non-Triadic Chords.'

Ok thanks for help. I'll probably make a sectons for stuff like suspensions too.
#9
By the way, will all chords with a b5 be placed in the diminished section? Like maj7b5, dom7b5 or maj#11(wich also has a natural 5th) for example?
Last edited by Usernames sucks at Jul 29, 2011,
#10
Quote by Usernames sucks
By the way, will all chords with a b5 be placed in the diminished section? Like maj7b5, dom7b5 or maj#11(wich also has a natural 5th) for example?


Well, a #11 isn't a fifth, it's an eleventh (fourth,) and it has the major triad intact, so I would definitely call that one major. To be based on a diminished triad, it would have to have a b3 as well as the b5. I would call your maj7b5 a major chord, too, but with an alteration, since there is no triad made up of 1 - 3 - b5. Likewise a mmaj7 would be minor. There's a lot of exceptions/grey area, huh?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#12
Quote by Usernames sucks
Ok thanks for helping me! for #5 chords, would a dom7#5 be augmented? Or is it only the "normal" aug chord that will fall into this group?


I would consider it to be augmented. A dom7#5 is a 1 3 #5 and b7. Since an augmented triad is 1 3 #5, I'd consider the dom7#5 to be in the augmented group. However, that's open to debate. It's just where I'd put it.
#13
Quote by Usernames sucks
Ok thanks for helping me! for #5 chords, would a dom7#5 be augmented? Or is it only the "normal" aug chord that will fall into this group?


yep. augmented seventh chord. not too common, but you see it.
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