#1
Hey everyone, how's it going?

I'm an avid user of Elixir Nanowebs for acoustic guitar, usually in either custom light, or light gauge. Whenever I want to change my strings, I order a pack of them, because I know I won't be disappointed, and I'll get about 2/3 months use out of them, because my disgusting, sweaty hands rip through uncoated strings like you wouldn't believe. Plus, I like the brightness that they give my otherwise bassy guitar.

Recently, I read an interview with Tommy Emmanuel, and when asked about his favourite strings, he said he likes to use as many different brands as possible, to keep his guitar sounding bright and alive, rather than letting it settle into a particular brand.

Now, I wonder if theres any real hard evidence for this. Do you believe that only using one brand of strings makes your guitar sound boring, or that it settles into the strings, and sounds less vibrant?

My view is that every string brand will be subtly different tonally (despite hearing that most guitar strings are made in the same factory), due to what each company does with them to make them uniquely theirs, and hearing slightly different variations might make that sound better/more vibrant to YOU, but I can't see how that would work with other people, who don't hear your guitar every day, and don't have anything to subconciously compare it to.

Nonetheless, I thought this might provoke an interesting discussion, and I'd be gald to hear your input on this.

-Bryn
#2
Hmm, a strange thing occured when I started my response...

I was completely in agreement with OP, but when I started typing out my response it made me really consider my own stance on it. On the one hand, I do believe that the player's ears would grow accustomed to one particular sound after using the same brand for so long.

But, because all strings are a little bit different, they would have different qualities in what they made the guitar do as well. Some strings with higher tension would cause the top of the guitar to vibrate differently; perhaps this is also true between strings of different materials and makes?

If there was a difference, couldn't that cause the top of the guitar to act differently? Perhaps changing and growing accustomed to a particular type of strings? Or, at least, the vibrations that the strings cause?

I think after thinking about it a bit more, I find that it makes a bit of sense to me that one brand of string over and again could perhaps cause the top to become accustomed. So, just like our ears grow accustomed to one sound, so can our guitars...

...At least that's the completely non-scientifically based conjecture I'm going to throw out there, haha.
"Here I sit, beneath a lonely line."

~iband48's signature