#1
I was browsing the Ibanez site and saw that one of their guitars (RGA72QM) had a maple set-in neck with "KTS TITANIUM".

Is this a good thing, or a bad thing? Wouldn't that affect the sound somehow? What about if you wanted to adjust the truss rod?

If reinforcing a neck with titanium is such a good thing why don't more guitar companies do so?
#2
It's the truss rod that's titanium
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#3
Are you certain on that? No weird extra metal bars or something? Are truss rods normally steel then?
#4
100% certain.

Normally they are made from steel, yes

*edit*

Here's the brand of truss rod in question. I guess it kinda is extra rods, but it's all for the truss rod

http://www.k-t-s.com/english/titaniumrods.pdf
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
Last edited by pigeonmafia at Jul 25, 2011,
#5
Titanium has a very high tensile strength, but is very brittle, and extremely expensive, hench why most manufactures don't use it.

I'd actually make for a great truss rod, you'd prolly never break it, but it would be very sensitive to adjustments, since it resists bowing better than steel.
#6
I didnt realise that steel truss rods breaking was a big problem for most guitarists? Its never happened to me.
#7
It could be like the EVH guitars though where the neck/headstock is reinforced with graphite bars, seperate from the truss rod
#8
Quote by ethan_hanus
Titanium has a very high tensile strength, but is very brittle, and extremely expensive, hench why most manufactures don't use it.

I'd actually make for a great truss rod, you'd prolly never break it, but it would be very sensitive to adjustments, since it resists bowing better than steel.


The issue with it's use is more the directional grain structure, which makes it very difficult to machine. It's not as brittle as you might think. I have souvenir ice screws from my climbing days (~20yrs ago) that are bent quite severely, but didn't fail. The real bonus is the weight. Combined with the right wood, it would help make for a very nicely balanced guitar.
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#9
Quote by Necrotise
I didnt realise that steel truss rods breaking was a big problem for most guitarists? Its never happened to me.



It's rare, but it does happen.


^ All I know is that if you hit pure titanium with a hammer, it'll shatter. Your climbing hooks are prolly mixed with another metal to reduce the brittleness of them.
#10
Quote by ethan_hanus
Your climbing hooks are prolly mixed with another metal to reduce the brittleness of them.


Nope. Pure titanium from the Soviet submarine program - repurposed.
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#13
Quote by ethan_hanus
Oh wow, that's intense, how'd you get those?



There were plenty of them floating around in the late 80s. They weren't the easiest to use, but a rack of them sure were light for fast alpine ascents.
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Swart STR Tweed
Quilter 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1