#1
My band does covers. Some have solos some don't. Usually ones that do look up tab boom done.

But there is some I'd like to make up my own.

When u guys plan on it how do u do it?

What's the ideas u think about in making a solo.

Need som advice.

Most of these are over chords.
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
Last edited by silly6-string at Jul 25, 2011,
#2
Start off slow with high attention to chord-tones, double-stops and unison bends usually do the trick for this. Save the higher notes towards the end. If you start the solo on a higher note (ie 12th fret or above) then I like to plan a descent around halfway through the solo, then build up speed and ascend with scale patterns.

Everyone has different tastes and styles, this is one I'm fond of have fun!
#3
First you need to figure out what key the song is in. Then you need to learn the shapes of the scales on the fretboard. Some people like to improvise their solos from start to finish and others like to compose an entire solo based on a central theme or motif.

Typically when you're doing your own interpretation of someone else's solo, it's a good idea to begin and end your solo as it is in the actual song. For example, if you're playing "Back in Black" by AC/DC, start your solo with, say, 2-4 bars of Angus Young's solo. Then do your own thing for however many bars you're allotted. Then when you're finishing, just wrap up the solo with 2-4 bars of the end of the real solo. So when you're playing live, people will recognize the solo and also appreciate the changes, as opposed to learning the whole solo note-for-note or not playing any of the original solo at all.
Bands I've seen live:

Def Leppard
Journey
Tool
Testament
Megadeth
Slayer
Mastodon
Deftones
Alice in Chains
Foo Fighters
Rodrigo y Gabriela
Last edited by British Josh at Jul 25, 2011,
#4
Quote by British Josh
First you need to figure out what key the song is in. Then you need to learn the shapes of the scales on the fretboard. Some people like to improvise their solos from start to finish and others like to compose an entire solo based on a central run.

Typically when you're doing your own interpretation of someone else's solo, it's a good idea to begin and end your solo as it is in the actual song. For example, if you're playing "Back in Black" by AC/DC, start your solo with, say, 2-4 bars of Angus Young's solo. Then do your own thing for however many bars you're allotted. Then when you're finishing, just wrap up the solo with 2-4 bars of the end of the real solo. So when you're playing live, people will recognize the solo and also appreciate the changes, as opposed to learning the whole solo note-for-note or not playing any of the original solo at all.


Some real good points here

Bear in mind that some songs will have solos that you simply shouldn't change. For example, I once covered Whole Lotta Love by Led Zepellin in college and because I'm not really a fan I thought I'd just improve with the pentatonic. But that one phrase with the 2-tone/4 fret bend would have been missed by any fans of the band
#5
Ya Ty for great advice. Keep them coming. Any advice is good.

Some songs my band plays have no solos. Like say jumping jack. If I wanted to make my own. It's the key of B. What would be some good ideas?

I try to be creative. But they dont sound like the pros. When I learn a solo after I learn it. I'm like that was easy WTF. Why can't I think of that lol. I'm in the routin of going up and down scale patterns. What's the best way to learn intervals? And base your solos around them intervals with out it going to high or to low and Polaroid the feeling and passing or tension of the solo?

I hope that makes sence.
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#6
when your playing: think melodically, try and play notes that fit the key and the chords. forget scale patterns, or anything technical and try to actually make music--if you can't or wouldn't sing it (an octave up/down if neccesary) don't play it. listen to the rest of the band and try to react to them, and don't rely on licks--if you try to force a lick, even if its theoretically correct, it will sound shitty.

when your practicing: practice playing the root, third, fifth and (if applicable) seventh of each chord--get used to how they sound, and how they connect to notes in the next chord. try mixing in tonally clear material (for example, a line that connects the third of one chord with the third of the next) with tonally ambigious material (a blues scale for instance). try to always know where you are in the song, and work off that. try using licks in a controled manor, and improvising in and out of them (for example, to using a specific lick over a specific chord in a specific part of the song every time it comes up, but playing lines and melodies that weave in and out of it). practice giving sections contrast (different registers of your instrument, different dynamics, different timing)--but don't use physical technique to do so (for example, doing a tapping line, followed by a sweep--how you play something is irrelevant to what it is) and practicing using a constant stream of every conceivable rhythm (for example, a solo of all quartet notes, eighth notes, sixteenth notes, triplets, quarter triplets, quintuplets, whole notes, half notes, dotted quarter notes etc.).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#7
I like to hear live songs as close to the album as possible, because that is how I remember the music in my head. I have watched lots of older bands live performance clips on youtube....some of the improvised solos during live concerts pale in comparison to what was on the album (IMO). Some times this is because of the ego, guitarists will come and go and the next guy won't want to play the solo that someone else created....but I think if you want to play your own, do as suggested above and keep some of the same elements in so people still hear the similarities.
#9
In my mind, when I think of a melodic guitar solo, it is something that I could also imagine a person singing (not always but on some things). I don't know if there is an actual theory lesson or formula for something that is melodic, so that might not be totally correct.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkY8HyzI1bU

Yngwie Malmsteen.....never mind the speed scales and shredding. This version is a little scaled back to what he does live with this song. Usually did this one before Far Beyond the Sun.

I would say this is fairly melodic.
#10
The minor pent scale I use everytime. Lol I need to use others. You think Joe satch and other neo metal are good ideas to listen to?
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#11
Quote by silly6-string
The minor pent scale I use everytime. Lol I need to use others. You think Joe satch and other neo metal are good ideas to listen to?


Why not listen to players who are renowned for their sense of melody rather than technical difficulty if you are looking for melodic playing.

Dave Gilmour http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYSao48WYPc

Gary Moore http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O_YMLDvvnw

Mark Knopfler http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbZRbBskloE

Ian Moss (more relevant to Australia but meh) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcjZrf_g-lQ


Otherwise you already know the answer to this question. Here we seem to say "play major and minor scales with accidentals" almost constantly, and it doesn't seem to sink in. Once you couple those with the ability to harmonise them and identify keys, you have the foundation to analyse and play with ANY song of ANY genre.

But for some reason people are looking for a quicker way, like somebody who wants to lose weight without exercising. Go figure.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#12
Because I don't know who is melodic an who isn't. Ty for the links. Trying to get better and better mean asking questions. Ty
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#13
Quote by silly6-string
Because I don't know who is melodic an who isn't. Ty for the links. Trying to get better and better mean asking questions. Ty


It "can" be objective as to who is a melodic guitar player is, but it is generally agreed that they write and play guitar lines that are memorable and add to the song, rather than detract from it.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
A good idea would be to make your harmony interesting. Often a solo only sounds good because of the backing, eg a non melodic solo. The backing makes it interesting though.
UG's New Zealand Resident!
#15
Quote by AlanHB
It "can" be objective as to who is a melodic guitar player is, but it is generally agreed that they write and play guitar lines that are memorable and add to the song, rather than detract from it.



I just want it to sound good. Lol. We play all covers and some are slow. Wind crystal Mary. To fast paranoid. Etc. Ijust my solos to go along with the rthym.

I guess what I mean rests at the correct time and timing with my notes and bends. Depending on the song. I don't wanna be yngwie. Just my self


I'm going back to my teacher in aug. And ideas what I should be asking him to teach me?
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#16
Sometimes less is more. Learn resolving notes for certain scales and phrases. Some notes or phrases build drama, and lets the listener "know" that there is more coming. For example, lets say you are soloing in E minor using pentatonic blues stuff. Ending a phrase on a D note leaves the sense of incompleteness, and would be a nice lead in to the next phrase. Similarly, ending on an E is usually a simple way to wrap it up.

Treat a solo like a story. It has to have drama in the right places, and build to proper conclusions and resolutions. And frantic shred is not always the best way to get there. Try some more soul and some bends until you can "feel" it more.

If you do a song that never had a solo, then you might want to keep it more like just a quick instrumental fill.

When doing covers you sometimes need to retain some of the same intent as the original, especially with very recognizeable ones. Personally, I don't play the solo for "Crazy Train" note for note, but I try to capture the same spirit and get close with the most famous parts.
#17
Quote by silly6-string
I'm going back to my teacher in aug. And ideas what I should be asking him to teach me?


The same thing you're asking us, how to find the key of a song and scales you can use to improvise solos.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#18
I'm laughing and I'm smiling cause I know what's likely in store for you, John, just hang in there. Learn the Notes, because once you do that I can open up the sky for you, and believe me, these questions and worries won't even be a concern from here on out

But, I also have a bit of advice for you, make the main thing...the main thing, don't seek to jump around right now and address so many things at once, because if you do as I have been writing you to do, allll these things are going to be sorted. Just hang in there and stay cool in this heat. You're almost thorough with the Prerequisites needed for making all these areas a thing of the past. What do you have now, 2 more lectures, the review and the Final?

Right now you're in the drivers' seat....you can make all these things happen.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jul 26, 2011,