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#1
I know the major scale in all 7 positions across the neck but I find soloing still really lacking...

For example, sometimes I'll just mess around in C major or G major across the neck but everything sounds choppy and boring...

Does anyone have any advice how I can view these 7 shapes so that I can play more smoothly?

Also, I know all the notes on the fretboard but I can be a little slow figuring out which note comes next in keys that have more sharps or flats...what can I do about this? I feel stuck.

Thanks!
#2
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#4
It sounds like you learned more of a classical type approach which will benefit you greatly later, but what you're looking for are closed jazz shapes, major/minor always follow the same pattern of notes and as such can be played from a simple closed voicing http://jguitar.com/scale?root=C&scale=Aeolian&fret=8&labels=none&notes=sharps simply play the blue notes and change the root (but keep the pattern) for different keys its a great shortcut for knowing which note comes next in scale. as for choppy and boring....... improvise more often and try to find sounds you like
#5
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
how long have you been playing? how often do you practice? out of that time how often do you practice soloing/improv?


I have been playing for 4 years...I practice as often as I can...sometimes 3 hours a day or more..sometimes an hour...averageprob about about an hour and half a day.

I dont really know about how long i practice improv...i practice scales and read up on theory and cover songs that have solos...so I grasp the concept but I have trouble executing.
#6
Quote by Bad Kharmel
It sounds like you learned more of a classical type approach which will benefit you greatly later, but what you're looking for are closed jazz shapes, major/minor always follow the same pattern of notes and as such can be played from a simple closed voicing http://jguitar.com/scale?root=C&scale=Aeolian&fret=8&labels=none&notes=sharps simply play the blue notes and change the root (but keep the pattern) for different keys its a great shortcut for knowing which note comes next in scale. as for choppy and boring....... improvise more often and try to find sounds you like


Thanks for the response...I am familiar with the C minor scale (flat 3rd, 6th and 7th compared to parallel key...C major)

But I get sloppy in keys like this probably because I usually practice in the simple keys of C major, G major, F major, etc...

Can you explain what you meant with the blues note thing? Thanks
#7
Quote by dvm25
Thanks for the response...I am familiar with the C minor scale (flat 3rd, 6th and 7th compared to parallel key...C major)

But I get sloppy in keys like this probably because I usually practice in the simple keys of C major, G major, F major, etc...

Can you explain what you meant with the blues note thing? Thanks


If I understand correctly, the typical blues note is a augmented 4th/diminished 5th interval away from the root (making the blues note F#/Gb in C major). However, since it's not a very stable or consonant sounding interval, it's best used as a passing note. You wouldn't want to hang around on that note very long.

If I'm wrong about this, somebody please correct me.
Last edited by stickfigurekill at Jul 25, 2011,
#10
Quote by Woffelz
Learn the modes?


No, stop, no. You're (hopefully) referring to the 7 boxes in the major scale, which he already learned according to the OP.

Also agreeing with Sean. I'd have to see some sort of context to know what your exact problem is. You may well just need to play with more backing tracks or work your way out of thinking in boxes, but it's hard to tell without seeing exactly what you do with a solo.
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#11
If you haven't already, learn the notes all over the fretboard. Then triads all over the fretboard. Then practice playing the following over each chord in a progression/backing track etc:

- Play the root of each chord
- First 2 notes of the scale over each chord
- First 3 notes of the scale
- First 5 notes of the scale
- The root, 3rd and 5th over each chord
- The root, 3rd, 5th and 7th
- Root, 3rd, 5th ,7th, 9th
- Then try one octave of each scale up and down

There are an infinite amount of ways you can do things like this. You are developing fluidity in finding the right notes over each chord so that when you come to playing, you can hear what notes will sound good over each chord. Then you can add all the other notes and eventually end up with 12 possible notes over any chord that you can manipulate. Its a good deal of work but doing it for a half hour or more each day is going to provide huge improvements in a relatively short period of time.
Andy
#12
By the way, I mean each chord scale over each chord ie.

The progression is Dm, G7 and C. A 251 in the key of C.

You play, A C major scale but starting on the note D for Dm, a C major scale starting on the note G for G7 and a C major scale starting on C for C major.
Andy
#13
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
By the way, I mean each chord scale over each chord ie.

The progression is Dm, G7 and C. A 251 in the key of C.

You play, A C major scale but starting on the note D for Dm, a C major scale starting on the note G for G7 and a C major scale starting on C for C major.
Andy


That's not really an application of chord scales, just emphasising the root of each chord. Alternatively you can emphasise the 3rds and 5ths of each chord too, but it's all going to be the C major scale and nothing more.
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#14
Quote by dvm25
I know the major scale in all 7 positions across the neck but I find soloing still really lacking...

For example, sometimes I'll just mess around in C major or G major across the neck but everything sounds choppy and boring...

Does anyone have any advice how I can view these 7 shapes so that I can play more smoothly?

Also, I know all the notes on the fretboard but I can be a little slow figuring out which note comes next in keys that have more sharps or flats...what can I do about this? I feel stuck.

Thanks!


Well, now that you know the scale, you need to practice playing music, that utilizes those scales.

Try learning some melodies, guitar solos...ect.
put 2 & 2 together

Try this

pick an easy melody. For example "twinkle twinkle little star" or anything that you know so well that you can hear it in your head.

Figure it out by ear and practice it in each of the positions.

do this for LOTS of melodies.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 26, 2011,
#15
Quote by dvm25
I know the major scale in all 7 positions across the neck but I find soloing still really lacking...

For example, sometimes I'll just mess around in C major or G major across the neck but everything sounds choppy and boring...

Does anyone have any advice how I can view these 7 shapes so that I can play more smoothly?

Also, I know all the notes on the fretboard but I can be a little slow figuring out which note comes next in keys that have more sharps or flats...what can I do about this? I feel stuck.

Thanks!

Pretty common. Many players blame their soloing skills on lack vocabulary and a small palette in terms of theory and scales. But there's so much you can do with just 5 notes (any scale spring to mind?) Make up a phrase, something simple, then experiment with it. Of course you can try it with the 7-note major scale as well.

-displace the phrase by an octave, or do the reverse
-displace a note, or a couple of notes within the phrase by an octave

Think rhythmically,
-where to place the phrase in the bar
-where to place the notes in the phrase

Find where you can replicate all this in all five pentatonic positions.

Try all the above with different scales like Lydian, over maj7 chord.

The amount of mileage you can get from one single, tiny idea is incredible. Add bends, pre-bends, slides, think about how you want to articulate the notes, think about dynamics, pick, thumb, snaps with the fingers. EXPERIMENT!
Last edited by mdc at Jul 26, 2011,
#16
Quote by AlanHB
That's not really an application of chord scales, just emphasising the root of each chord. Alternatively you can emphasise the 3rds and 5ths of each chord too, but it's all going to be the C major scale and nothing more.


Thats exactly what a chord scale is. A C major scale starting on D is D Dorian, Starting on G it is G Mixolydian and starting on C it is C Ionian. These are the chord scales which go with these chords. Leaving the names out makes it simpler.
Andy
#17
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Thats exactly what a chord scale is. A C major scale starting on D is D Dorian, Starting on G it is G Mixolydian and starting on C it is C Ionian. These are the chord scales which go with these chords. Leaving the names out makes it simpler.
Andy


It just doesn't make all that much sense if you're staying diatonic to the key. If you were actually changing scales on different chords, it would be a perceptual boon. Let's say you wanted to play Double Harmonic for the G chord: G Ab B C D Eb F#. There are three alterations and the scale has it's own particular motion/pull. The method you suggest seems like it's suited towards those who flail blindly on scales who just need a pattern to put their fingers in.
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#18
Quote by soviet_ska
It just doesn't make all that much sense if you're staying diatonic to the key. If you were actually changing scales on different chords, it would be a perceptual boon. Let's say you wanted to play Double Harmonic for the G chord: G Ab B C D Eb F#. There are three alterations and the scale has it's own particular motion/pull. The method you suggest seems like it's suited towards those who flail blindly on scales who just need a pattern to put their fingers in.

Nope. Makes perfect sense. like it or not, you play a C major scale over a Dm chord its going to want to resolve to D. Its a D Dorian scale. C Major is a Key. Whether you give these modes names or not, a C major scale will only be straight up C major(ionian) over the C major chord as this is the only chord in the key which, when playing the scale, will want to resolve to C.
Andy
#19
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Nope. Makes perfect sense. like it or not, you play a C major scale over a Dm chord its going to want to resolve to D.


Playing D, F and A over a Dm chord will be consonant, yes, but played within the context of a C major key, they create tension within the key, wanting to pull back to C, E and G. In this case, the tension of playing an F in C major is particularly strong, craving a resolution by step back to E.
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#20
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Nope. Makes perfect sense. like it or not, you play a C major scale over a Dm chord its going to want to resolve to D. Its a D Dorian scale. C Major is a Key. Whether you give these modes names or not, a C major scale will only be straight up C major(ionian) over the C major chord as this is the only chord in the key which, when playing the scale, will want to resolve to C.
Andy



So, what you believe then is that, every time the chords change, the tonal and key center "changes" with each chord.

Sean
#21
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Nope. Makes perfect sense. like it or not, you play a C major scale over a Dm chord its going to want to resolve to D. Its a D Dorian scale. C Major is a Key. Whether you give these modes names or not, a C major scale will only be straight up C major(ionian) over the C major chord as this is the only chord in the key which, when playing the scale, will want to resolve to C.
Andy

Not if you're playing each of those chords for a matter of seconds as part of a progression that's ultimately going to resolve elsewhere.

Individual chords don't "resolve" anywhere - progressions resolve.
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#22
Quote by Sean0913
So, what you believe then is that, every time the chords change, the tonal and key center "changes" with each chord.

Sean


The key centre, no. The tonal centre yes. Against a Dm chord a C note is the interval of a 9th. How exactly does D, F or A want to resolve to C? The key is only established with the movement of the chords. If you take a snapshot of each chord how can you identify the key? Of course over a 251 in C we could merely think C major scale. But whether you like it or not each chord will present a new canvas.
Andy
#23
Quote by steven seagull
Not if you're playing each of those chords for a matter of seconds as part of a progression that's ultimately going to resolve elsewhere.

Individual chords don't "resolve" anywhere - progressions resolve.


I wasn't speaking of resolutions. Over the Dm chord the D note is the root, the F is the 3rd and the A is the 5th. Over the we have C, E, G (135). The chord progression does not change how these notes sound over the chords. If I play C, E and G against a Dm chord I am playing the intervals of a 7th, 9th and 11th. Yes this may be a desired effect, but how are you outlining the chord beneath. Anyone studying improvisation should be able to play the chord tones of each chord as it passes.
Andy
#24
Tonal center = key

For instance, the tonal center for a progression in the Key of C is C.

When you're playing over a ii or V in the key, you don't change keys, or scale. Those chords progress back to the tonic (tonal center).
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#25
Quote by steven seagull
Not if you're playing each of those chords for a matter of seconds as part of a progression that's ultimately going to resolve elsewhere.

Individual chords don't "resolve" anywhere - progressions resolve.


And another point. Chord progressions don't resolve, individual chords do. A dominant 7th chord resolves perfectly to the 1 chord of the key ( V-I). Every chord in a key has its own pull to other chords. Of course one chord will be part of many other keys. Its through exploring these resolutions that we create chord progressions. They only progress because of these relationships.
Andy
#26
Quote by GuitarMunky
Tonal center = key

For instance, the tonal center for a progression in the Key of C is C.

When you're playing over a ii or V in the key, you don't change keys, or scale. Those chords progress back to the tonic (tonal center).


You dont change keys. You do change chord scales. The fingering of the scale does not. Your thinking should. How you approach each of the seven notes of the scale as they relate to each of the chords in the progression. Or indeed how all 12 notes relate to each chord in a progression. Neglecting this aspect is to think 'Im playing in a key' and to neglect what chords are actually being used. Its like a colouring book. If you scribble all over the page you will get the colour within the lines some of the time. Most of the time you will go outside the lines. Approaching each chord differently is to emphasise the chords themselves. Its staying within the lines.
Andy
#27
^ Well, Chord progressions progress, but they do ultimately resolve at the tonic.

regarding your idea that chords resolve as opposed to progressions.......

let's look at a progression with a secondary dominant.

i V/ii ii V I

^ The V/ii progresses to ii, but the progression is not resolved because the two chord functions as a subdominant, and feels as if it wants to move away from the tonic. The ii chord then progresses to the V, which of course is the dominant chord so were not resolved there either. progression is finally resolved when we get back to the tonic. that's more or less how tonality and chord progressions work. This idea about playing Dorian over the ii chord, and then Mixolydian over the V is misleading and inconsistent with common practice.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 26, 2011,
#28
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
You dont change keys. You do change chord scales. The fingering of the scale does not. Your thinking should.


Well, it's the same scale. it's just you're playing over different chord.

try this..

play C to C ( ascending and descending)
now play D to D
now play G to G

and then back to C to C


in this context, you shouldn't think of those as modes, but rather the same C Major scale. it's just the range outlines the chord progression. if you practice it that way and play musically (like a measure per chord), you should be able to hear the progression .... the functionality.

another good thing to do is arpeggiated chord progression, and in between play the scale.

I arp - scale
ii arp - scale
V arp - scale
I arp - scale

so what you have there are your chord tones ( someone refer to them as target tones), and the connecting scale tones. Everything you need to make a melody in that key.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 26, 2011,
#29
so you know all the modes then...make patterns and melodies and phrases dont just hit a bunch of notes going up and down the scale dude. make licks within major scales, also try ending on the relative minor for G major that would be E so try ending on E instead of G. Gives it a different feel then. i a lot of the time end on relative minor...just because major is to happy for me...but if im writing something classically influenced the major sound in some cases sound way better as a resolution.
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#30
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ Well, Chord progressions progress, but they do ultimately resolve at the tonic.

regarding your idea that chords resolve as opposed to progressions.......

let's look at a progression with a secondary dominant.

i V/ii ii V I

^ The V/ii progresses to ii, but the progression is not resolved because the two chord functions as a subdominant, and feels as if it wants to move away from the tonic. The ii chord then progresses to the V, which of course is the dominant chord so were not resolved there either. progression is finally resolved when we get back to the tonic. that's more or less how tonality and chord progressions work. This idea about playing Dorian over the ii chord, and then Mixolydian over the V is misleading and inconsistent with common practice outside of instructional DVDs and material written by 80 shredders looking to supplement their income.


I suggest reading up on this stuff. Your understanding of what modes are is wrong. They are not a new way of thinking or an outdated of way of thinking. They are a relevant as every other aspect of music theory. Its like saying thinking of triads is an outdated way of thinking.
Andy
#31
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, it's the same scale. it's just you're playing over different chord.

try this..

play C to C ( ascending and descending)
now play D to D
now play G to G

and then back to C to C


in this context, you shouldn't think of those as modes, but rather the same C Major scale. it's just the range outlines the chord progression. if you practice it that way and play musically (like a measure per chord), you should be able to hear the progression .... the functionality.

another good thing to do is arpeggiated chord progression, and in between play the scale.

I arp - scale
ii arp - scale
V arp - scale
I arp - scale

so what you have there are your chord tones ( someone refer to them as target tones), and the connecting scale tones. Everything you need to make a melody in that key.


By hearing the functionality you are doing the same thing but choosing not to name it. This is a preffered way of thinking. Not a definition of what it is.
Andy
#32
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
I suggest reading up on this stuff. Your understanding of what modes are is wrong. They are not a new way of thinking or an outdated of way of thinking. They are a relevant as every other aspect of music theory. Its like saying thinking of triads is an outdated way of thinking.
Andy



Actually Andy, I've done quite a bit reading on this stuff. The information I gave you is solid.

I'm not sure what you're getting at with this " outdated way of thinking" thing. maybe you were looking at somebody else's post, because I never said anything like that.


Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
By hearing the functionality you are doing the same thing but choosing not to name it. This is a preffered way of thinking. Not a definition of what it is.
Andy

it's not the same. one way looks at the entire context, the other way ignores it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 26, 2011,
#33
We've had this argument many many times on this forum Andy, and the person in your situation is largely agreed upon as incorrect. This however will probably not change your way of thinking.

Anyways I'd just like to delve into how you think about these anyway.

1. You have mentioned above that over D minor in the key of C, you will play D dorian. Would you use the same scale over D major?

2. If each chord resolves to a new tonic completely, does this mean that there is no key? For a key to be present a progression needs to resolve to it, but if it resolves to a new tonic every chord, you are effectively modulating (key change) on each chord. If you then claim each chord with new tonic a mode, a one-chord modal progression, then there can be no key. Is this how you view it?

3. If I have a progression C - Dm - G in C major, and I play just a C note over it all, am I changing scales/modes every chord? What if I play an E note over it all?


It would be great if you could answer these questions, I'm genuinely curious.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#34
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
You dont change keys. You do change chord scales. The fingering of the scale does not. Your thinking should. How you approach each of the seven notes of the scale as they relate to each of the chords in the progression. Or indeed how all 12 notes relate to each chord in a progression. Neglecting this aspect is to think 'Im playing in a key' and to neglect what chords are actually being used. Its like a colouring book. If you scribble all over the page you will get the colour within the lines some of the time. Most of the time you will go outside the lines. Approaching each chord differently is to emphasise the chords themselves. Its staying within the lines.
Andy

Most of the time you don't though, what you're talking about IS redundant and obsolete in the majority of modern music.

If we're talking about jazz or "pure" free-form improv then yes, I totally agree - the current chord is everything and should be your focus. Those are pretty niche scenarios though, in most contemporary music whilst the chord obviously needs to be taken into consideration there are other things to consider, the melody of the piece, the key etc.

You're working to the bigger picture with a rock, blues, metal, funk or pop song. In a jazz scenario I'd agree that a different approach is needed as it's very much a situation where you're looking to experiment and explore on the fly. The simple truth is that most of the music people listen to and play just isn't that complicated and doesn't need to be treated as such.
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#35
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Chord progressions don't resolve, individual chords do.


so basically you think that music is simply a serious of modulations? that's ridiculous. if it's all about the individual chords, then a key center is pointless.

Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
I suggest reading up on this stuff. Your understanding of what modes are is wrong.


something i would advise you to say to a mirror.

Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
They are not a new way of thinking or an outdated of way of thinking. They are a relevant as every other aspect of music theory. Its like saying thinking of triads is an outdated way of thinking.


they're a very outdated way of thinking. they have their uses, naturally, but functionally, they have been completely superseded by the key system. modal jazz brought some modal concepts back, but that stuff was less about modes and more about chordal exploration. modes are nowhere near as relevant as triads (unless you think ionian = major and aeolian = minor, which is also incorrect).

basically, andy, your understanding of modes is just chord-scale theory, which has nothing to do with playing modally -- it's simply a convenient way of visualizing accidentals.

as a musician, context is extremely important. as guitarmunky put it, your methodology ignores it entirely.
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#36
"This idea about playing Dorian over the ii chord, and then Mixolydian over the V is misleading and inconsistent with common practice outside of instructional DVDs and material written by 80 shredders looking to supplement their income." If that isn't saying its an outdaed way of thinking what is? Editing your post later to remove the last part about 80s shredders does not change that. Clearly everyone on this post assumes that to talk about modes and chord scales is to talk about playing modally ala modal jazz. It is not. If I am playing Dm for two bars, the BEST way to outline this chord is to play an arpeggio of the chord or to play D Dorian. I dont know what books you guys have been reading but whether you think C major, D dorian, L Lixloklian....there is no denying what it is. Intervals function over chords, not entire chord progressions. Thinking that they do is just wrong.

Key centres are established through what chords and resolutions are chosen. Thinking of each chord individually has nothing to do with thinking each chord is modulating because thinking D Dorian is not thinking of a different key. D Dorian is C major. Now regardless of how you want to think about it and regardless of how you want to defend your beliefs. If I play a C major scale over a Dm chord it will not want to resolve to C. Over G7, again it will not want to resolve to C. The progression wants to resolve to C.

Thinking C major only is fine, because its all the same notes. But your ear will naturally guide you to the intervals which function best over each individual chord. There is absolutely no other way to work. Its like saying modes are outdated now so we have abandoned the approach which best outlines each chord in favour of an approach which constitutes running up and down the notes from the key thinking only of the progression as a whole.
Andy
Last edited by Andy_Mclaughlan at Jul 27, 2011,
#37
Quote by steven seagull
Most of the time you don't though, what you're talking about IS redundant and obsolete in the majority of modern music.

If we're talking about jazz or "pure" free-form improv then yes, I totally agree - the current chord is everything and should be your focus. Those are pretty niche scenarios though, in most contemporary music whilst the chord obviously needs to be taken into consideration there are other things to consider, the melody of the piece, the key etc.

You're working to the bigger picture with a rock, blues, metal, funk or pop song. In a jazz scenario I'd agree that a different approach is needed as it's very much a situation where you're looking to experiment and explore on the fly. The simple truth is that most of the music people listen to and play just isn't that complicated and doesn't need to be treated as such.


Modes are not complicated. there is nothing 'free form' about thinking about modes. Most jazz is a series of 5-1 or 2-5-1 chord progressions. Yes lots of jazz has crazy chord modulations but then that is more a feature in fusion. If I am in C and I play D Dorian over the Dm chord. I am not playing some pure free form jazz, I am not exploring on the fly. I am outlining the chord. It is a simple concept.

The 7 notes in C major are C D E F G A B. Below I will show, again, a 251 in C and how each of these notes relates to each chord.

Dm
D - root
E - 2nd
F - 3rd
G - 4th
A - 5th
B - 6th
C - 7th

G7
G - root
A - 2nd
B - 3rd
C - 4th
D - 5th
E - 6th
F - 7th

C
C - root
D - 2nd
E - 3rd
F - 4th
G - 5th
A - 6th
B - 7th

Whether you want to think about it or not, that is the relationship between all 7 notes in the key and each chord. Just like our typical major scale, each one of those variations(ie starting on a different note) have a formula which relates to the 7 modes or chord scales. This is as basic a concept as the formulas for building chords. If Dm has the formula 1 b3 5, please explain how this is deviated from the C major scale. Now obviously it could be considered as the 1st, 3rd and 5th tones from the D major scale with the 3rd flattened. Or it could be considered as being the 1st, 3rd and 5th of D dorian as the 3rd is already flattened. This is simple stuff that has nothing to do with how you play. Its how this stuff is organised.
Andy
#38
Quote by AeolianWolf
so basically you think that music is simply a serious of modulations? that's ridiculous. if it's all about the individual chords, then a key center is pointless.


something i would advise you to say to a mirror.


they're a very outdated way of thinking. they have their uses, naturally, but functionally, they have been completely superseded by the key system. modal jazz brought some modal concepts back, but that stuff was less about modes and more about chordal exploration. modes are nowhere near as relevant as triads (unless you think ionian = major and aeolian = minor, which is also incorrect).

basically, andy, your understanding of modes is just chord-scale theory, which has nothing to do with playing modally -- it's simply a convenient way of visualizing accidentals.

as a musician, context is extremely important. as guitarmunky put it, your methodology ignores it entirely.


A convenient way of visulaizing accidentals? The key signature is the convenient way of visualizing accidentals. In C major all 7 modes have no accidentals as they are the same 7 notes.
Andy
#39
Andy could you please address my questions above.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#40
Quote by AlanHB
We've had this argument many many times on this forum Andy, and the person in your situation is largely agreed upon as incorrect. This however will probably not change your way of thinking.

Anyways I'd just like to delve into how you think about these anyway.

1. You have mentioned above that over D minor in the key of C, you will play D dorian. Would you use the same scale over D major?

2. If each chord resolves to a new tonic completely, does this mean that there is no key? For a key to be present a progression needs to resolve to it, but if it resolves to a new tonic every chord, you are effectively modulating (key change) on each chord. If you then claim each chord with new tonic a mode, a one-chord modal progression, then there can be no key. Is this how you view it?

3. If I have a progression C - Dm - G in C major, and I play just a C note over it all, am I changing scales/modes every chord? What if I play an E note over it all?


It would be great if you could answer these questions, I'm genuinely curious.



Missed your questions Alan. I do apologise.

1. D Dorian has the same notes as C major. It is merely the percieved tonality which that chord produces against the 7 notes of the C major scale. Over D major I would use a D major scale if it was the I chord in D Major or D lydian if it was the IV chord in A major.

2.You misunderstand me. Progressions dont resolve. A progression is merely a series of chords. There is no requirement for a progression to be in any key or to resolve anywhere. Assuming that all chord progressions are nice and smooth, it is the movement from chord to chord which establishes a progression and thus a key. A progression can go anywhere. As soon as we talk about modulation we dispel with the idea that chord progressions resolve anywhere. For instance an authentic cadence is a 5-1. Does this mean that every time we play the 5 chord in a key we must next play the 1 chord as thinking only of progressions resolving would assume? No we can go to any other chord creating a deceptive cadence. The deceptive part refers to the fact that the listener expects to hear the I chord coming after the V chord(even without an understanding of what that is). So a deceptive cadence decieves by going to another chord creating tension. This has nothing to do with a progression. Its the movement from one chord to another. String a bunch of these chords together and you have a progression. Not vice versa. Its like saying a blank canvas dictates what the painter will paint. A painter could spend hours drawing seemingly irrelevant lines which later become an integral part of the bigger picture.

3. One note, no. You are merely playing intervals against the chords. A C against the C is the root, against Dm its the 7th and against G its the 11th. E against C is the 3rd, against Dm its the 9th and against G its the 6th. It only becomes a mode when you play the other notes of the key. So of course, in practice we are playing music. Studying modes is a means for you to discover how each note of a key sounds against each chord of that key. Just like we have 7 basic chords within a key, we have 7 different perspectives on the same 7 notes. The mode, and as a result, the perceived tonality changes from one chord to the next. Even if you do not consciously think of different modes, the underlying chords will produce the associated mode sound and your ear will select the notes accordingly.

Hope that helps.
Andy
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