#1
Just a little bit of useless information that I've picked up, and I wonder if others have too.

I'm not sure if its become more noticeable since I got my new guitar but, when I hammer onto a fret, the string vibrates both sides of my finger. Naturally.

If I listen carefully I can hear it ringing both sides too, down near the sound-hole and further along the neck. I'm not sure if I like this.

If you hammer on in one direction up the neck. One will become higher in pitch while the other gets lower.

Is there a name for this?
Would it mess up decent recording being able to hear these extra notes not in the correct key?
Or is this just another one of the many beautiful and unexpected things that come with playing guitar?
#2
Well it isnt a problem if you are muting the other end of the string and youll often do that without even thinking about it
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#3
The same thing happens when you are strumming an open chord. Try strum one and then quickly mute it. You will hear that the part of the strings that are attatched to the tuning knobs to the nut are ringing, which some people find annoying. The solution to that is to wind something around that part of the guitar, like winding a bandana or using some tape to mute it.

But what you are talking about mostly sounds (to me) when you are tapping an acoustics. Be sure to hit the fret precisely so that the tapped tone sounds louder that that "bi-tone". I don't hear it if I'm playing normally or not are focusing on it.
#4
Quote by Casuist

Would it mess up decent recording being able to hear these extra notes not in the correct key?
Or is this just another one of the many beautiful and unexpected things that come with playing guitar?


I doubt its the latter. The frets are only designed to be in tune in one direction. The spacing in the other direction isn't correct, so its not even in a key.

I don't think, unless you can actually hear the notes distinctly when you're playing, that a microphone placed close to the soundhole would be able to pick them up. But then, I don't know much about recording classical guitars.
#5
youll find that the 12th and 7th are the worst places, 12th mostly. it is annoying if youre the one playing and its right next to you, but i figure if youre really playing, it probably wouldnt be noticeable to everyone else.
#6
Yeah, it's only really noticeable with hammer ons and where there's a hammer on there's usually a pull off. But I do wonder if there's been a circumstance where it has actually been a real problem for someone.
#7
I'm not 100% sure if this is the correct name, but if I'm not mistaken, this phenomenon is called Sympathetic Harmonics. The string is just getting fretted on both sides because you're pressing hard.

EDIT: Nevermind. Sypathetic harmonics are when you play one note and say an open string starts to vibrate along with it because they are related.
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#8
That's why you get an intersting sound from a vibrating string with lots of harmonic overtones, as opposed to a "pure" tone you'd get from a laboratory signal generator.

Obviosuly if you're alread fretting a note then the portion behind the fret will be unaffected by you picking, but if you hammer on then the section between the nut and your finger is just as free to react to your hammer-on as the section between the bridge and your finger - action permitting.
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