#1
Hey I was just wondering if my way of playing scales is different than what is accepted.
When I play any scale I always have it three-notes-per-string except for the G string which always has two notes. This applies to every scale I play. When I see diagrams it always have three notes on the G instead of my two. Obviously, this doesn't matter but I was wondering if you guys do this as well.
Thanks
#2
Yeah, it's better for speed playing and 3 notes per string shapes seem to fit over the pentatonic boxes better.
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#3
Ultimately, the idea is you'll learn how to see notes all over the fretboard. So, it wont matter. When you want to play a riff or a solo in a certain key, you'll know where to go, regardless of whether you learn your scales in an unusual way. It's just a stepping stone either way.
#4
Quote by carnagereap666
Hey I was just wondering if my way of playing scales is different than what is accepted.
When I play any scale I always have it three-notes-per-string except for the G string which always has two notes. This applies to every scale I play. When I see diagrams it always have three notes on the G instead of my two. Obviously, this doesn't matter but I was wondering if you guys do this as well.
Thanks

Even minor pentatonic? I respect you.

In all seriousness, nobody cares what strings you use for whatever notes you use. Just the notes matter. I'm curious why you insist on playing 2 notes on the G string. I like playing 3 notes on every string.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#6
I learnt the C Major diatonic kinda like this-
o fret- all of them
1- last strnig, first two strings.
2- 5,4,3 strings
3- all except three
4- only three
5 all
6- only two
7 all except two
8/9/10 pseudo X pattern, middle two missing on 8, only middle two on 9, all on 10.
12- Repeat

Make any sense to you?
#10
Practice playing scales every way you can think off that is not in a box shape! Box patterns have a habit of making you sound like you are running up and down a box pattern....which is exactly what it is!
Andy
#11
Quote by GS LEAD 5
I learnt the C Major diatonic kinda like this-
o fret- all of them
1- last strnig, first two strings.
2- 5,4,3 strings
3- all except three
4- only three
5 all
6- only two
7 all except two
8/9/10 pseudo X pattern, middle two missing on 8, only middle two on 9, all on 10.
12- Repeat

Make any sense to you?


^the no is the fret, and the rest are the strings to be played
#12
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Practice playing scales every way you can think off that is not in a box shape! Box patterns have a habit of making you sound like you are running up and down a box pattern....which is exactly what it is!
Andy



Well you'd be running up and down some sort of pattern whether you choose to recognize the particular shape or not.

Regarding scales that make "box" shapes on the neck (like pentatonics)....
You still want to know and utilize those scales. You don't want to ignore their shape just because it's a "box".... thats counterintuitive and ultimately counterproductive.

Recognizing the shapes...... box, triangle or whatnot is something we can use to our advantage.
It reinforces our knowledge, and makes it easier to navigate the fret-board.

When people sound like they are "running up and down a box pattern" it's because they practice the scale shape, but they don't practice musically. Ignoring the shape doesn't solve this issue. Practicing musically does.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 26, 2011,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well you'd be running up and down some sort of pattern whether you choose to recognize the particular shape or not.

Regarding scales that make "box" shapes on the neck (like pentatonics)....
You still want to know and utilize those scales. You don't want to ignore their shape just because it's a "box".... thats counterintuitive and ultimately counterproductive.

Recognizing the shapes...... box, triangle or whatnot is something we can use to our advantage.
It reinforces our knowledge, and makes it easier to navigate the fret-board.

When people sound like they are "running up and down a box pattern" it's because they practice the scale shape, but they don't practice musically. Ignoring the shape doesn't solve this issue. Practicing musically does.

I agree wholeheartedly. You can find the exact same notes from box shapes than you can from anywhere else. Utilizing these shapes doesn't mean you have to play them up and down without thinking. There's a good reason they exist.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#16
Quote by carnagereap666
Sean, your way is the best and is what I strive for (so far so good.) But in like Mike Dodge's lessons when he tabs out scales, I noticed he did them differently than I do. I was wondering if the way I do it is common or not.


Well for me it's (your approach) very common, but I didn't learn it from anyone, I have just seen this same idea perpetuated all over people's approaches to the scales on the guitar.

When I started studying Jazz with Jimmy Bruno, I had to modify the way that I do these same scales for the purposes of his teaching system, so, depending upon the context, of how and what I am playing, I can play very similar to the way that you stated, but it's only to facilitate certain Jazz ideas that he explains within his teaching system, which, I think are very logical, and frankly...his stuff is brilliant, no two ways about it.

I could do it my way, but in the context of Jazz, his way makes much more sense. Outside of Jazz I find his way would be very limiting.

I'll explain why, one of the things that his way is brilliant for, is visualizing instant adaptation to any number of key changes within a jazz piece. Outside of that idiom, my way, is usually over one or 2 keys at the most so it's much more "logical" and not limiting to me, to use everything else I know and teach. And by the way any students, that are watching this, NO I will/Do not eventually teach my students' things from Jimmy's system. It's his, not mine. Go learn it from him if you so desire; its worth it if you are interested in Jazz.

Best,

Sean