#1
I'm trying to get to get my ear up to par before I go to college and take my first ear training class. I don't have trouble with asending intervals (atleast with major and perfect intervals) but I'm completly lost with desending intervals.

Does anybody have tricks to recognizing them? For me with asending intervals I know which interval it is from the note I want to hear after it.

Major second- I hear do-re, like the start of a scale
Major third- I hear the do-mi-so triad
Perfect fourth- I hear so-do, it just sounds resolved to me
Perfect fifth- It's just an interval I can recognize because I've been exposed a lot to it
Major sixth- I want to hear fa after it, like the NBC theme do-la-fa
Major seventh- I hear it leading up back to do
#2
I just try to hear the mood in the song (scale, mode) at first, then I try to find the key.
Finding the intervals is the hardest part.
Ascending and descending major is easy to hear, but in minor and other modes you got to listen closely to recognize the scale.
Once that's done, you most likely only have 7 notes to worry about, but some are easier to hear than others.
Major seventh build up to the tonic, like in harmonic minor.
Major sixth builds a little up to the sixth.
Perfect fifth is the third note of the triad. (C-E- G )
Perfect forth just a semitone away form the third, and a tone away from the fifth.
Major third is second note of the triad. (C- E -G)
Major second is the start of both the minor and major scale.

The sixth is the hardest for me to recognize, snce it's not in the minor scale... which I usally play.
Knowing arpeggios and pentatonic scales help much too, at least fo rme.
Hope this helps you out!
#3
For descending intervals, as soon as I hear it, I reverse it. So if you're good at ascending, then you'll be able to figure it out easily.

Do you practice harmonic ones as well as melodic ones? In addition, if you haven't already done so, try recognizing compound intervals (greater than an octave).

There are certain things to consider with compound intervals such as the m3rd. It should be labelled a sharp9 rather than a m10th. Things like that.
Last edited by mdc at Jul 26, 2011,
#4
Quote by mdc
For descending intervals, as soon as I hear it, I reverse it. So if you're good at ascending, then you'll be able to figure it out easily.



This. If you can remember the pitch (fairly easy) then just reverse it in your head. I tried an online interval test, with ascending + descending harmonic and melodic intervals. It was crazy good practice.

What you could do, is whenever your with a friend just get him to play any two notes. Doesnt even have to play guitar, infact that might help you because he wont know what "right" ones to hit plus the notes wont come at a flurry like some sites give you.
Always waiting for that bit of inspiration.