#1
hey guys, so im in the process of fixing up an old acoustic guitar ive had laying around for awhile (new tuners, new nut ect ect.) the only thing with the guitar is tht the fretboard seems to be somewhat dryed out and the wood seems like it needs to be moisturized or something, is tht a problem? is there something i can do about tht?
#2
if its rosewood or ebony....get some lemon oil. dunlop makes a bottle of it for under a tenner.
Last edited by gurg06 at Jul 26, 2011,
#3
Go to your local pharmacy and get some Almond oil, its a great natural way of re-moisturizing a fretboard and its really cheap!!

For the love of god DONT use lemon oil!!!!!!
#4
Quote by mr7string
Go to your local pharmacy and get some Almond oil, its a great natural way of re-moisturizing a fretboard and its really cheap!!

For the love of god DONT use lemon oil!!!!!!


why?
#5
Quote by mr7string
Go to your local pharmacy and get some Almond oil, its a great natural way of re-moisturizing a fretboard and its really cheap!!

For the love of god DONT use lemon oil!!!!!!


I'm just checking: are you aware that lemon oil is also natural? Lemon oil does come from lemons which are just as natural (though less trendy) as almonds.
#6
Quote by TheGreifer
I'm just checking: are you aware that lemon oil is also natural? Lemon oil does come from lemons which are just as natural (though less trendy) as almonds.


exactly!
I use lemon oil on my fretboard almost every time I change strings. I does nothing but wonders for my les paul! takes of all the dirt too!
#7
yes, the board is rosewood, ive never even heard of using almond oil. unless theres a good reason to not use lemon oil, ill look into it
#8
I should have gone a bit more into detail haha

If its say dunlop or and equally overpriced brand then it will be mixed with a ton of other stuff alright, but like i say, overpriced

If its cheap natural lemon oil then the acidity will dry your fretboard out over time

The reason i say Almond oil is that the tree your fretboard was cut from 9/10 produces its own form of Almond oil naturally therefor it has no harsh chemicals that will do any damage however minute they might be

In the end its your choice but personally i feel i get much better long term results using Almond
#9
Quote by mr7string
I should have gone a bit more into detail haha

If its say dunlop or and equally overpriced brand then it will be mixed with a ton of other stuff alright, but like i say, overpriced

If its cheap natural lemon oil then the acidity will dry your fretboard out over time

The reason i say Almond oil is that the tree your fretboard was cut from 9/10 produces its own form of Almond oil naturally therefor it has no harsh chemicals that will do any damage however minute they might be

In the end its your choice but personally i feel i get much better long term results using
Almond


why would dunlop let harsh chemicals be put into something that is supposed to be used on a fretboard? I've been using the stuff for 10 years and my fretboard is good as new!
Last edited by gurg06 at Jul 26, 2011,
#10
Quote by gurg06
why would dunlop let harsh chemicals be put into something that is supposed to be used on a fretboard? I've been using the stuff for 10 years and my fretboard is good as new!


Because it is mixed down, much like alcohol. Using 100% lemon oil would rot your fretboard over time due to the acidity, companies mix it with cleaning agents, lubricants and fragrances that do a good job at first but can cause problems over time

For example some people have said that using lemon oil on old guitars make them much more prone to warping due to temperature/ humidity changes which isnt good if your traveling with your guitar, it can also react with sweat varying by the person obviously.

Its not that its bad for guitars just id rather have something natural that does NO harm than something that works a maybe a tiny bit better but has all these potential issues