#1
Do these really...Exist? Like a chord with a 9 in the bass being in 5th inversion, 11 in the bass being 6th, and 13 being 7th? i've used chords with their 9ths in the bass before, but never really thought of it as the chord in 5th inversion...just thought of it as the chord with a 9 in the bass, the word "inversion" never really popped into my head.

obviously these "exist" as in there's nothing preventing anybody from using them...but are they formally known as 5th-7th inversions? is there literature on it? anything interesting to discuss here, any ideas on interesting things you could do with these, etc.? this last paragraph is basically my way of saying don't be shy, if you have a trippy concept you wanna discuss related to this go ahead, if its as simple as somebody telling me "yes, they are called 5th-7th inversions" nobody learns anything interesting and it becomes a boring unnecessary thread
#2
well my theory is not the greatest, BUT I dont believe on guitar there could be a 5th inversion chord, Im not entirely sure how to explain why NOT but I think anything like a C9 chord with the 9 as the root would just be a fourth inversion chord. BUT I could well be wrong. My theory is as I said before not that great.

EDIT: My best explanation upon further thought is on guitar u usually do not play chords with more then four notes in them voicing wise, so it would be unbelievably uncommon to go past the fourth inversion. But I guess upon further thought maybe there could be a 5th inversion???? idk lol
Last edited by awesomo41894 at Jul 26, 2011,
#3
I believe it does work just like saying 5th, 6th, 7th inversions, just like other chords. A maj7 chord has an extended partial and formally has a possible 4th inversion, so I would believe that adding partials would not make it any different. But it's music, even Bach broke his own rules that we still use today.
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#5
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Nope, you don't ever describe anything past 4th inversion, so there's no such thing as 5th or 6th inversion chords.

so then what would i call a chord that's made up of (from lowest to highest) D, C, E, G, if I can't call it Cmajor9 in 5th inversion?
#6
Quote by TMVATDI
so then what would i call a chord that's made up of (from lowest to highest) D, C, E, G, if I can't call it Cmajor9 in 5th inversion?


Cmaj/D.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Why don't they allow 5th inversions, etc.?


you don't think the figured bass gets too complex?

JRF mentions 4th inversion, but i've never even seen that -- as far as i'm aware of, it doesn't go past 3rd inversion.

and by the way:

Quote by TMVATDI
so then what would i call a chord that's made up of (from lowest to highest) D, C, E, G, if I can't call it Cmajor9 in 5th inversion?


that would be 4th inversion, not 5th.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jul 27, 2011,
#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
you don't think the figured bass gets too complex?

JRF mentions 4th inversion, but i've never even seen that -- as far as i'm aware of, it doesn't go past 3rd inversion.

and by the way:


that would be 4th inversion, not 5th.

Oh it definitely would, but, in my limited experience, I always took figured bass for a more "practice" kind of thing to keep your compositional skills on top.

I've never seen past a 3rd inversion, and even that was more a passing tone kind of thing, I'm just wondering for curiosity's sake.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Jul 27, 2011,
#10
oh yeah i meant 3rd inversion, yasee i gots me inversions all inverted...but please answer b5's question lol
#11
Anything past 3rd inversion is going to give you a new chord, and a different function.


Quote by DiminishedFifth
Oh it definitely would, but, in my limited experience, I always took figured bass for a more "practice" kind of thing to keep your compositional skills on top.

I've never seen past a 3rd inversion, and even that was more a passing tone kind of thing, I'm just wondering for curiosity's sake.


Figured bass was made for notating Baroque and early Classical harmony. You'll be hard pressed to find a real 11th or 13th chord in baroque music. Composer's used these notes more subtly in the form of suspensions, passing notes, escape notes etc, which figured bass is more suited to notating.

3rd inversion occurs pretty often. Normally something like this:

IVb V V7d Ib

or

i ib7d VI V in a minor key
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 27, 2011,
#13
in "theory" lets see....A7 chord 4 notes - 3 inversions .. extend it add the 9th drop the root..an additional 3 inversions..it could be seen as an extension of the base chord A7...( i think of it that way for simplicity) so in theory they could be called 5 6 7 inversions ... but if this became common practice...think of the chord symbol / naming problems that would arise..as if we dont have enough confusion with that already..


play well

wolf
#14
There are no inversions beyond 3rd inversion (7th in the bass). The extensions (9, 11, 13) aren't actually considered chord tones. You will see chords that appear to have a 9, 11, or 13 in the bass, but that's not really what's happening. It's usually just calling another chord by a different name. For example, C/A is an Ami7, and C/D is a D9sus with no 5th.
#15
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Just to clarify my original post, 4th inversion is a typo, I meant to say 3rd.


Lol i was REALLY confused there for a moment