#1
Hello all.

I'm here with a question- how can I push myself and become better at guitar? I used to play under a teacher until the payments got too high, but learning from a teacher is something I would like to do again in the near future. But that might not be able to happen until I find a job so I can pay for the lessons, so I was wondering, what can I do to push myself further for the time being?

I usually play metalcore/thrashy music, and I've just recently begun to pick up some blues. But what are some of the techniques and genres I could learn to push myself? It's a little hard to look for something when you don't know what you're looking for, you know what I mean?
#2
Hello Pat

Firstly, whenever possible always get a good teacher, a teacher who know his/her stuff, and motivating you to learn more.

Secondly, you must know exactly what kind of guitarist that you want to be.
Then prioritize on what musical elements are important to that style of music you want to play. If you want to be a shredder, then focus on speed picking and sweep picking, not finger style. If you want to play country, learn chicken picking.

You said you want to play metalcore/trash metal, then you've got to have
~great rhythm playing
~obviously learn the songs in this style
~learn to CREATE music in this style (at least start from a simple riff in metalcore/thrash style, then move on to full song)

Aside from that you need to evaluate yourself, what's musical element that's holding you back from expressing yourself fully in guitar in general.
How's your:
~ Aural skill
~ music theory skill
~ Scale and fretboard mastery

If you have any question regarding any of each element, feel free to ask
#3
When I was 15 (sometime in the 80's). My friends would be hanging out. I would be in my room with a Gorilla 10 w amp and my Japstrat. I took lessons. When I got home I probabally spent 20 hours a week on that lesson. My fingers would bleed. I took lessons from one of the best guitarists I've ever seen. Great teacher too. Find a way to keep taking lessons. Take those lessons very reriously.

I also totally agree with what bobbyprayogo said though.
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#4
Quote by bobbyprayogo
Hello Pat

Firstly, whenever possible always get a good teacher, a teacher who know his/her stuff, and motivating you to learn more.

Secondly, you must know exactly what kind of guitarist that you want to be.
Then prioritize on what musical elements are important to that style of music you want to play. If you want to be a shredder, then focus on speed picking and sweep picking, not finger style. If you want to play country, learn chicken picking.

You said you want to play metalcore/trash metal, then you've got to have
~great rhythm playing
~obviously learn the songs in this style
~learn to CREATE music in this style (at least start from a simple riff in metalcore/thrash style, then move on to full song)

Aside from that you need to evaluate yourself, what's musical element that's holding you back from expressing yourself fully in guitar in general.
How's your:
~ Aural skill
~ music theory skill
~ Scale and fretboard mastery

If you have any question regarding any of each element, feel free to ask


This one teacher I'm looking at right now teaches music theory, so I was definitely thinking about learning from him. And when it comes to creating songs, I actually have one right now that's in the finalizing stages- lyrics and everything, metalcore song. I'm actually pretty satisfied with how it is right now since I've put all my knowledge of metalcore into it, but I want to wait till I learn more theory and scale techniques and skills before I write riffs to other sets of lyrics I've written. But thanks for the tidbit on learning songs in these styles- I honestly didn't think of that when I would go and jam, lol.

As for the evaluation, aural skill has to do with hearing, right? The most I can do by ear is recognize what tuning a band is playing in and a few riffs here and there. As for music theory skills and scales, I honestly don't know much in that department (which is why I'm planning to get a teacher sometime soon, though).

Anyways, thanks for your help! I'm definitely going to apply myself to this to rise to the top of my game!
#5
yous said youve been branching out to blues thats great. go on youtube and find blues backing tracks then try to create lead riffs that you have not really experiemented with before. coming up with differnt riffs for your solos is a huge way to diversify and improve your playing and can be done without a teacher.