#1
Not to positive this is the right place so feel free to move... But....

I want to get into writing more solos and playing more solos. I haven't ever really been into solos but no i'm starting to get more interested in them but i'm so lost on how to write one or any techniques for soling... Any help on starting out?
Gear
Guitars-
Paul Reed Smith SE Custom
Paul Reed Smith Mike Mushok Baritone
Squire Bullet
Carlos Acoustic
Epiphone Banjo
Amps-
Mesa Boogie DC-5
B-52 LS-100 and Matching cab
and tons of miscellaneous stuff
#2
uhm

Try learning some basic scales like the major minor and the pentatonic scales,you can find them on this site.Then just start playin with the notes within those scales.

technique wise It really depends on the genre you play . get your alternate picking down if you want to do fast runs and licks.Maybe Sweep picking and tapping if you are into shreding,or hybrid picking for some twangy country.
Try looking up your favoite soloists and see what there techniques are,and then learn em.

peace and good luck bro.
#3
try learning your favorite solos to learn new techniques. also experiment with solos form bands you don't normally listen to to learn more than one style of solo.
#4
Quote by floydrose09
try learning your favorite solos to learn new techniques. also experiment with solos form bands you don't normally listen to to learn more than one style of solo.


best advice you can follow. ideally, you will want to learn music theory, start by learning the notes on the fretboard, then learn the circle of 5ths/4ths and learn what scales go with what keys, etc. but, take it from someone who has been down that path, learning theory is extremely helpful, but not the answer to becoming a great soloist. solos come from the heart, from what you are feeling at any given moment.. so.. you aren't going to feel "V chord, I need to play mixolydian!" music is a language, and the best way to speak well is to develop your vocabulary. learn some of your favorite solos, then sit back and figure out why you like the solos so much.. what parts made you feel tension or resolution.. then you can go to your theory and figure out why stuff works.. then you can transpose it to any key or situation you need... however, i find this is only great for composing solos or developing some kind of a frame work for a solo. improvising is whatever is in the moment and that's where your developed language comes into play. you will play licks that are under your fingers, and in your ears. keep at it.