#1
Its time to learn solo teqniques any advice where to start?
I want to learn alternate picking styles , i like Neal Schon , Craig Goldy just to name a couple. I need help with alternate picking primarly.
#2
Start slow and make as little movements with your fingers as possible, the less time it takes for your fingers to hit the frets the faster you'll go (Obviously). So just practice hours a day everyday! and before you know it you'll start kicking ass!!
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#4
Take it slow and practice it, seriously, you'll notice a difference in 2 days.
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#5
you could try this....

if you dont know it already, find the main major scale fingering pattern with the root note on the 6th string.

play it up and down using alternate picking, 12345678 etc from the low e string to the high e string...and then alternate pick back across the fretboard... 87654321

then mix it up a bit...make stuff up like 1234 2345 3456 4567 etc.... make your own weird stuff up there....

alt pick across the fretboard and back to the low e again

if you cant do it slow you wont be able to do it fast. as the person above said...just keep doing it for a few days and you will notice the difference
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#6
Quote by MitchellJBurges
Start slow and make as little movements with your fingers as possible, the less time it takes for your fingers to hit the frets the faster you'll go (Obviously). So just practice hours a day everyday! and before you know it you'll start kicking ass!!


This.

As Mitchell said, the less time it takes for your fingers to hit the frets the faster, but ALSO what many people leave off: the less time it takes you to pick the string, the faster you'll be.

Make your picking action as small as possible (i.e. don't go too far past the string each time) and it should speed up your alternate picking (and take less effort too).
#7
I've primarily used alternate picking for over 30 years, and actually upstrokes far more than downstrokes when it comes to chording. My first introduction to this style was Al DiMeola in 1977... I think the track was "
"... he was the first I remember to advocate alternate picking in Guitar Player magazine, and an inspiration for a whole generation of metal guitarists who often forget to give him credit.
I've been writing/recording hard rock/metal songs for over 25 years, and I can't think of any time I've purposely written anything that requires two individual downstrokes in a row... but that's one thing that sets me apart from most others.

Some of the advice in above posts on string sequencing is useful... in addition, try alternating with string skipping. Speed is not as important as consistency and accuracy. And, I would suggest letting your fingers do what they want to do in terms of natural movement... let the exercises focus on your picking hand, not your fingering... guys who's fingering hands barely move when they play look robotic, and their playing and songwriting usually reflects the same lack of emotion and expression when they maintain rigid technique rules instead of allowing themselves to bend and flail.

And, for me, speed happens when I relax... which seems counterintuitive when you're getting more intense, but it really helps to avoid cramping up.

Also, I've tried every pick style/material/size/firmness on the planet over the years... I mean EVERYTHING...
I always come back to the red Dunlop Jazz III picks... stiff picks give better attack, no rebound lag, and this small style keeps your fingers closer to the strings for pinch harmonics and other effects. The only thing this pick doesn't do well is a longitude scrape... the edges aren't sharp enough for a good dig.

Plenty of mp3's and vids of my stuff to check out on the audio/video page of my sig link.

Good luck with your studies.
Last edited by Terry Gorle at Jul 29, 2011,
#8
Quote by 91RG350
you could try this....

if you dont know it already, find the main major scale fingering pattern with the root note on the 6th string.

play it up and down using alternate picking, 12345678 etc from the low e string to the high e string...and then alternate pick back across the fretboard... 87654321

then mix it up a bit...make stuff up like 1234 2345 3456 4567 etc.... make your own weird stuff up there....

alt pick across the fretboard and back to the low e again

if you cant do it slow you wont be able to do it fast. as the person above said...just keep doing it for a few days and you will notice the difference


^^^Yup. Try and play along with a metronome too if you have one. Start slow and slowly speed up. A good one is to pick a slow tempo and work that scale shape all the way down the neck and back. Then speed it up a little and repeat. Do this a few times and you'll start to build some speed and accuracy. Good Luck and Practice hard.
#9
Quote by Terry Gorle
Some of the advice in above posts on string sequencing is useful... in addition, try alternating with string skipping. Speed is not as important as consistency and accuracy. And, I would suggest letting your fingers do what they want to do in terms of natural movement... let the exercises focus on your picking hand, not your fingering... guys who's fingering hands barely move when they play look robotic, and their playing and songwriting usually reflects the same lack of emotion and expression when they maintain rigid technique rules instead of allowing themselves to bend and flail.

I was with you up to the bolded part.

Maximizing the efficiency of your picking hand is very important, but so is minimizing the movement of your fretting hand. Having really precise, robotic technique in no way inhibits the creative process or your use of other fretting techniques such as bending or vibrato. Watch that Al di Meola video you posted. Specifically, watch his fretting hand. His fingers don't move very far from the string during his really fast runs, but despite his mechanically precise technique, his music is still very emotive and he uses bends and vibrato just fine.
#10
Quote by Geldin
I was with you up to the bolded part.

Maximizing the efficiency of your picking hand is very important, but so is minimizing the movement of your fretting hand. Having really precise, robotic technique in no way inhibits the creative process or your use of other fretting techniques such as bending or vibrato. Watch that Al di Meola video you posted. Specifically, watch his fretting hand. His fingers don't move very far from the string during his really fast runs, but despite his mechanically precise technique, his music is still very emotive and he uses bends and vibrato just fine.


Well, I guess your opinion of minimal hand movement would equal my opinion of normal hand movement when it comes to the DiMeola vid...
The necessity for proximity seems obvious in order to play fast runs.

I was referring to players who never let their fingers move more than a 1/2" from the strings no matter what they're playing. I think that type of extreme discipline is counterproductive to expression, musically and visually. That's what I mean by robotic.
Last edited by Terry Gorle at Jul 29, 2011,