#1
Sup bros.

I just bought a brand new SM57 along with a peavy 6505+ head, I'm running all this through a line 6 UX2 (XLR connection for the mic) So the problem is, I'm blasting this loud ass peavy head at about 3 or 4 (Loud as shit) and the mic is picking up a semi weak signal.

When I record and listen to whatever I played, it sounds like I recording the riff through another room, and i've got the mic positioned RIGHT on the center of the cone. I cranked mic gain on and off, changed input levels and stuff, and it didn't seem to do much, everytime I record it just sounds quiet as shit. Halp?

Thanks.
#2
Please tell me you HAVE pressed the phantom power button or I'm going to be in disbelief for the next week...
#3
Quote by Slex666
Please tell me you HAVE pressed the phantom power button or I'm going to be in disbelief for the next week...

Why? The SM57 is a dynamic microphone, it doesn't need phantom power.
Last edited by Alex Vik at Jul 28, 2011,
#4
Quote by Alex Vik
Why? The SM57 is a dynamic microphone, therefore it doesn't need phantom power.

You just HAD to showcase my mic'ing/recording experience, didn't you.
Really, I just use my UX2 for playing through the POD Farm models when I don't have my amp.

Eggospartan, what program are you recording in and have you tested the mic and/or cable on another recording interface or a mixer?
Last edited by Slex666 at Jul 28, 2011,
#5
Quote by Slex666
Did you really have to showcase my mic'ing/recording experience?
I mainly just use my UX2 for playing through the POD Farm models.

To be fair, you did that yourself


On-topic: TS, can you record a clip of this and post it somewhere for us to hear? It's hard to know what you mean without hearing it first-hand.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#6
Quote by Slex666
You just HAD to showcase my mic'ing/recording experience, didn't you.
Really, I just use my UX2 for playing through the POD Farm models when I don't have my amp.

Eggospartan, what program are you recording in and have you tested the mic and/or cable on another recording interface or a mixer?


In recording in reaper 64bit. And no, The cable is brand new, the mic is brand new, and the interface, well i don't have another, but I've used it (somewhat) reliably to recording guitars via 1/4th in.

I do have some issues with buffers/latency that sometimes causes some sharp feedback sometimes, but idk what that has to do with the signal I'm getting out of the amp. To put it differently, I'm cranking gain left and right and only difference being the overall volume of the recording, and it doesnt make a big enough difference to fix the problem.

Quote by DisarmGoliath
On-topic: TS, can you record a clip of this and post it somewhere for us to hear? It's hard to know what you mean without hearing it first-hand.


It's like midnight atm moment here so, no i can't post a clip lol. If you'd be kind enough to check back tomorrow, i'll have one up in this thread
#8
Play as loud as you're possibly gonna play and set the gain just below the RED level on your interface. That is max gain without clipping or distorting.

That's it. Should sound superb!
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#9
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
Play as loud as you're possibly gonna play and set the gain just below the RED level on your interface. That is max gain without clipping or distorting.

That's it. Should sound superb!



Thats the problem, I normally do that. But when i listen to what I recorded, and sounds really ****ing quiet.
#10
Follow the signal chain.

Guitar - Peavey - Cab - SM57 - 6UX2 - Computer - Software (Digital Audio Workstation)

Something in that chain aint working right. Start at one end or the other and test everything. The guitar is working, and so is the Peavey and its speaker cabinet. That brings you to your mic.

Do you have a way to plug the mic in to something else to test it?

Alternately you could plug a different mic (or at least a different SOMETHING) into the UX2 to see if it could be the mic. Maybe it's a dud?

A different something would be a sound source: DVD player, iPod, ANYTHING that makes a sound that you can wire to the UX2.

If you can record an MP3 from your phone through the UX2, into the computer then it's your mic. If not, then it probably is either your UX2 or something with the computer or its software.

If this is all the equipment you have you might bring it all back to the place you bought it and have them test it out for you to make sure everything works. If not, demand a different one.

You can also plug your MP3 player (or whatever sound making device) into the mic or line jack on your computer to see if your computer is working.

You need to find a way to test out every link in your chain. Find. Fix. Done!
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#11
So I tried using a different microphone and got a similar result, mic is right next to speaker but it sounds like its in a distant land. So UX2 is the culprit?

EDIT: Here i have recorded a simple riff with the SM57, make note that the recording only gets moderately audible when I crank the gain on the interface to near max levels, and it still sounds like its ****ing smothered by a blanket. REAL LINK!
Last edited by eggospartan at Jul 28, 2011,
#12
You might want to make that dropbox link publicly available.

According to someone at Line 6, the mic preamp on the UX2 has a measly 20db of gain. (http://line6.com/support/thread/47412) Even the M Audio Fast Track has 48db, while more 'pro' preamps will have 60db, sometimes 75db (such as Apogee Duet.)

Mics like the SM57 and SM7B need all the clean gain they can get.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
Last edited by muso_catolico at Jul 28, 2011,
#13
Quote by muso_catolico
You might want to make that dropbox link publicly available.

According to someone at Line 6, the mic preamp on the UX2 has a measly 20db of gain. (http://line6.com/support/thread/47412) Even the M Audio Fast Track has 48db, while more 'pro' preamps will have 60db, sometimes 75db (such as Apogee Duet.)

Mics like the SM57 and SM7B need all the clean gain they can get.

Booyahhh!! I <3 my Duet

Anyway, after my brief outburst of emotion, if it really has just 20dB of gain that is pretty embarassing as far as preamps go! Maybe that is the problem, though my initial thoughts without hearing the clip lead me to suspect poor EQ (whether on amp or through mic placement) which is resulting in a flat and uninspiring sound... depends on how well TS described the actual problem!
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#14
Mic placement might be a problem, because I can't remove the cab cover without cutting it open . But I can tell you for sure that the mic is on axis with the speaker, and maybe about 8 inches away or less.

So if it is the shitty preamp in the UX2, do yall suppose i Put one or something? or any other alternatives? Thanks for the help so far guys :]

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/19498401/sadface.mp3 <=== link for the SM57 test.
#15
Quote by eggospartan
Mic placement might be a problem, because I can't remove the cab cover without cutting it open . But I can tell you for sure that the mic is on axis with the speaker, and maybe about 8 inches away or less.

So if it is the shitty preamp in the UX2, do yall suppose i Put one or something? or any other alternatives? Thanks for the help so far guys :]

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/19498401/sadface.mp3 <=== link for the SM57 test.

Right then, here goes...

1) What size is the cab? Presumably a 4x12, right? You won't like this part, but my first bit of advice is to treat some of your low end rumble that is muddying things up. Raise the cab off the ground, preferably onto a slab of concrete/thick wood. This will reduce floor-borne vibrations and (hopefully) cut out a lot of the noise you're getting down low. It will also reduce the leakage of low-end through your floor into the rest of your house, probably improving your neighbours'/parents' relationship with your amp

2) Get down on the floor, while playing your guitar, and get your head closer to the speaker you want to mic up (listen to each speaker and decide on one you think has the best tone/most punchy sound) and at the same height as the centre of the cone. Now you will be hearing more of what the mic hears, so adjust your amp's EQ from this position, and you will get a much better tone to tape (or hypothetical tape, as you're not recording to tape). It will also be better for if/when you play live and have your amp miked up... the sound guy will love you if you get a nice sound for him already, unlike most gigging musicians I've dealt with!

3) Bring the mic much closer... 8" is too far away for a good close-miked sound akin to modern metal. It's fine if you have several mics and want to place one further back to add depth/room to your sound, but you don't want any room sound in your close mic.

4) Get some headphones on, start playing again, and (with the screw on the mic stand loose) start sweeping the mic around slowly and listening to where you like the sound. Make mental notes of your favourite few positions, and record a trial in your favourite position. If it sounds ace - keep the position and get recording; if not, loosen the screws on the stand and search a little harder.


Edit: Oh, and don't be afraid to roll-off the low end on your amp's EQ beyond what you would expect... just because most of us start with the 3-band EQ set to all 12 o'clock doesn't mean you have to stick near them for a balanced sound. Different guitars have different tones, and some might require you to roll off the bass a lot, in order to get a nice sound coming through the cab.

Finally, you could try and lower the gain to the point where you can still comfortably play the track, and then slowly adjust it back to the level that sounds best. Most modern metal isn't as high-gain as you think!
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jul 28, 2011,
#16
I don't know... it sounds plenty loud enough really, and obviously the preamp isn't going to be as nice as a $2000 dollar one but it should accomplish what you need it to.

If anything, it sounds like your amp has too much bass dialed in, and it's as if you're recording in too small of a room so the excess bass is building up even more, making a muffled sound. On top of that, the further your mic is away from the grill, the more room ambiance you will get, thought the SM57 won't get a terrible amount as say, a condenser would.

Are you using a neck or bridge pickup? How is your amp EQ set?

EDIT: Just read what he said ^^^^.
Ibanez AS93
Fender Marauder
Vox Pathfinder 15R
Last edited by muso_catolico at Jul 28, 2011,
#17
THE AMOUNT STUPIDITY IN ME HAS REACHED CAPACITY LEVELS. Someone ( not me ) decided to **** with the speaker cables in the back. long story short, only one of the speakers was playing. But since this thing is SO GOD DAMN LOUD I couldn't tell the difference. I'm so sorry guys. I feel incredibly stupid right now.

brb killing self
Last edited by eggospartan at Jul 28, 2011,
#18
Quote by eggospartan
THE AMOUNT STUPIDITY IN ME HAS REACHED CAPACITY LEVELS. Someone ( not me ) decided to **** with the speaker cables in the back. long story short, only one of the speakers was playing. But since this thing is SO GOD DAMN LOUD I couldn't tell the difference. I'm so sorry guys. I feel incredibly stupid right now.

brb killing self

I still suggest you try as we suggested to improve your sound as well, but glad you've found the potential problem
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#21
Are you using a laptop? It may have recorded through the internal mic of the laptop!!

Make sure your mic is selected properly in your recording software. I made EXACTLY this mistake the other day, and had exactly the same reaction:

wft?!

Sure enough, I had recorded via the shitty laptop mic and not my nice condenser!
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#22
^If you are too stupid to select the wrong input device, you are a moron
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp