#1
I am in a small band and we have a gig tomorrow which i do not want to go like our last one, where we just stood still looking at eachother knowig it was going badly.
I am not a regualar performer so I'm not really used to letting myself go on stage. Are there any tips you guys have to performing without letting your playing get messy?

P.s. Sorry if this is the wrong forum, i could think which one to put it in.
#2
put accurate playing above performance would be rule number one... if you play well, people will appreciate it...if you cant stand there and play the songs, then you havent practiced enough...simple as that... sorry i couldnt be more positive..! hope the gig goes well
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#3
Freedom of movement on stage in front of an audience comes with experience.

But try to at least go from 1 place to another from time to time
#4
My main tip would be to think about something you want to do, and then do it 115% as much (i.e exaggerate movements) because when the adrenaline gets pumping and you heart gets going, you feel like you're rocking out like crazy but to the audience you're standing stiff as a board, slightly nodding your head or tapping your foot!

Edit: Oh, and try to interact with the crowd (look into the audience, even if you aren't looking at anyone in particular, because looking into an area of people will have at least several of them think you're looking at/connecting with them) more than just nervously stepping up to the mic and saying 'this song is called ______'.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jul 28, 2011,
#5
Practice more until you can play the songs without effort.
And try to play more shows, everyone has bad ones. It really hurts when you have a bad first one, but it can get better with work and preparation.

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#6
I agree that the emphasis should be on playing well, but there is a "performance" aspect of seeing a band live.

I'm assuming your question is about how to avoid being stiff on stage. Once your band can accurately perform the music, a good first step might be to simply move to the beat in place or a step or two away. This often comes naturally, but if not, get familiar with this while occasionally glancing at your bandmates.

Get comfortable with your instrument that you can play it well while walking a few steps. Non-singers can walk toward each other. Bassist can walk to drummer. (If worried about tripping over your instrument cables, consider wireless as an option, but that's clearly a luxury.)

Also, look at your audience. A lot. Looking at them makes them feel appreciated.

For Pete's sake, don't avoid smiling at the audience and each other occasionally. People see bands to have a good time. If you look like you're having fun and spreading it around the venue, that's a great thing. EVEN IF the gig isn't going over well, plaster a smile on your face and look like there's nowhere else you'd rather be.

Subtle tip that may not apply to all bands/genres: If there are multiple singers, even for occasional harmonies, try sharing a mic sometime. I was in bands for years until we tried this. Didn't think much about it, but several people commented during & after the show that it looked very cool. Hey, it worked for those 4 lads from Liverpool.

(The Cars were famous for limited audience interaction and minimal movement, but let's assume our bands aren't as good/famous/etc. as them.)
#7
Write out a setlist so you know exactly what you're doing and when, this can include interaction among other things. something my band does is a guitar/bass battle part way through leading into a song. it may take up a bit of time, but it's fun for the audience as well as the performers
#8
Ideally you should practice, your "performance". you should know where your going to jump, where any big guitar swings/spins, can and will go. You 2 or 3 practices before a show, should involve picking your setlist and then performing the setlist in it's entirety. practice your movements in practice before you take them on stage.
#9
Practice the set and make sure you've got it down. For me stage movements was something I just started doing over time and experience playing in front of a crowd. ****ing around with your buddies at practice when practicing (WHEN YOU HAVE THE SONG DOWN) is a good way to build up a supply of moves you can do during the performance. In the end just remember to have fun.
#10
Quote by TheWEBBY
Practice the set and make sure you've got it down. For me stage movements was something I just started doing over time and experience playing in front of a crowd. ****ing around with your buddies at practice when practicing (WHEN YOU HAVE THE SONG DOWN) is a good way to build up a supply of moves you can do during the performance. In the end just remember to have fun.


Yep pretty much this.

If you don't move around at practice, why do you think you're magically going to do it on a stage full of people? So practice then is a place not to just practice music, but also to practice your stageshow.

It's of course too late to change anything now, as the gig is today. Instead pay attention to stuff the band can work on for the future.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Just keep putting yourself out there performing in front of an audience. You can be damn sure that I was up there stiff as a board my first few shows. As you start becoming more comfortable with your playing, with your band, and with audiences, the beast will be unleashed. Its charisma. Sure, you might miss a few notes, but when you've played enough times when you realize it doesn't matter all that much (you are your harshest critic) you might not be so scared of its outcome.
It doesn't even have to be musical. I would do readings or presentations in front of classrooms and I even decided to get a part in a one-act play.