#1
I have my major scale-derived modes down, but I can't seem to apply them yet.

As an easy example, do I play a Lydian mode in A while the song is in E, as the progression of the song moves from E for 2 bars, to C# for 2 bars, to A for 2 bars, to B for 2 bars? Is that how it works?

Or do I play the major scale while on E, the Aeolian/minor scale while on C#, Lydian while on A, and then Mixolydian while on B?

Do I always move the mode with the chord of the scale, or do I just hang on a certain mode through a whole progression? Or both? I want to shred! Help! : )

Thanks!
#2
Quote by westhearsay
I have my major scale-derived modes down, but I can't seem to apply them yet.

As an easy example, do I play a Lydian mode in A while the song is in E, as the progression of the song moves from E for 2 bars, to C# for 2 bars, to A for 2 bars, to B for 2 bars? Is that how it works?

Or do I play the major scale while on E, the Aeolian/minor scale while on C#, Lydian while on A, and then Mixolydian while on B?

Do I always move the mode with the chord of the scale, or do I just hang on a certain mode through a whole progression? Or both? I want to shred! Help! : )

Thanks!


if the song is in E major, you play in E major. you don't go out of key here(assuming you mean C#m, otherwise you have an E# -- a #1), so E major would do you just fine.

you can play the pattern you know as A lydian, but you won't be resolving to A, since the listener has the key center of E in his ear. you'd just be playing E major if you were to play that pattern.
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